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The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4978 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3934 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3927 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
979-5672 - Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6907 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
979-2714 - Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3918 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4969 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-3903 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
979-2724 - Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
979-2721 - Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
979-2718 - Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3931 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6922 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6660 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
A curious brown bear (Ursus arctos) two year-old near the parking lot at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6909 - A curious brown bear (Ursus arctos) two year-old near the parking lot at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
979-6540 - A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4963 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unnamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6666 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unnamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4968 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6889 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3932 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3938 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing in ice near Larrouy Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-4261 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing in ice near Larrouy Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6920 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-4468 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
A large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) inspects the Zodiac near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3915 - A large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) inspects the Zodiac near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6659 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-4471 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-3966 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
979-5683 - Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
Adult male leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) with Lindblad Expeditions guest in Zodiac. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3937 - Adult male leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) with Lindblad Expeditions guest in Zodiac. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
979-6541 - A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4967 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
979-2713 - Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing in ice near Larrouy Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-4258 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing in ice near Larrouy Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) breaching near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-3907 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) breaching near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.    (rr)
979-3209 - Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew. (rr)
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-3969 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6890 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Divers Lisa Trotter and Robert Alexander enter the water with a large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. This image is model released, RA0209 and LT0209.
979-4016 - Divers Lisa Trotter and Robert Alexander enter the water with a large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. This image is model released, RA0209 and LT0209.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3933 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6665 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) fluke-up dive near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-3968 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) fluke-up dive near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6664 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3913 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6903 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3920 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3936 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-4470 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
979-6543 - A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3930 - kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3935 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Adult male leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) with Lindblad Expeditions guest in Zodiac. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice
979-3939 - Adult male leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) with Lindblad Expeditions guest in Zodiac. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unnamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6669 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unnamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
Adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-4673 - Adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
979-2716 - Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6897 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6888 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-3964 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6901 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
979-2710 - Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-3970 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3926 - kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3940 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-4469 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
979-6542 - A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
Adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-4672 - Adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6663 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) with two cubs-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6878 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) with two cubs-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6900 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6905 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-4476 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6919 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.    (rr)
979-3206 - Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew. (rr)
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6918 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for sockeye salmon with two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6884 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
979-5682 - Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
979-2720 - Tourism booms in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new developments. Resorts are springing up along many areas of pristine coastline.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing in ice near Larrouy Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-4263 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing in ice near Larrouy Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6658 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6902 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
979-2711 - Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4972 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
979-3208 - Night fishery for Humbolt Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) waters just outside Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This panga fishery is the largest in Mexico, taking out some 100,000 metric tons of squid each year. This product is primarily sold to Korea and Japan. Fisherman receive roughly 20 pesos a kilo (about 10 cents a pound USD) for cleaned squid. A good night will yield one ton for a three man crew.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6661 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6906 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Divers Lisa Trotter and Robert Alexander enter the water with a large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. This image is model released, RA0209 and LT0209.
979-3916 - Divers Lisa Trotter and Robert Alexander enter the water with a large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. This image is model released, RA0209 and LT0209.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) breaching near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-3905 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) breaching near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
979-3906 - Adult Antarctic Minke Whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) surfacing near the Antarctic Peninsula. This whale is also known as the Southern Minke Whale. The minke whale is the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (28'10" to 35'1") for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. The gestation period for minke whales is 10 months and babies measure 2.4 to 2.8 metres (7'10" to 9'2") at birth. The newborns nurse for five months. Minke whales typically live for 30-50 years; in some cases they may live for up to 60 years. As of 2008, the IWC estimates for Southern Hemisphere Minke Whales is 665,074 . The IUCN list Antarctic Minke as Lower Risk/Conservation dependent.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3921 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6898 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4975 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
A large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) inspects the Zodiac near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3914 - A large, curious, female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) inspects the Zodiac near Booth Island on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. This is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
979-4674 - Adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing near the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer near the Antarctic Peninsula. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods. Humpback whale populations here are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts. A 2007 study identified seven individual whales wintering off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica as those which had made a trip from the Antarctic of around 8,300 km. Identified by their unique tail patterns, these animals have made the longest documented migration by a mammal.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) at the board walk with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6904 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) at the board walk with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-4472 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
979-6539 - A lone adult dwarf minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata subspecies) surfacing in the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. The minke whales are the second smallest of the baleen whales - only the pygmy right whale is smaller. Upon reaching sexual maturity (6-8 years of age), male and female minke whales measure an average of 6.9 and 7.4 metres (22'8" to 24' 3") in length, respectively. Estimates of maximum length vary from 9.1 m to 10.7 m (29 ft to 35 ft) for females and 8.8 m to 9.8 m (28'8" 10" to 32'5") for males. Both sexes typically weigh 4-5 tons at maturity, and the maximum weight may be as much as 14 tons. Minke Whales are widely distributed throughout the world, commonly found from the poles to the tropics but prefer the open sea. The dwarf minke whale (B. acutorostrata subspecies) has no population estimate, and its conservation status is categorized as "data deficient".
Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
979-2712 - Busy tourism boats in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The Los Cabos area has grown to over 180,000 inhabitants (2007) in the last 10 years. Development is proceeding unchecked as the area struggles to provide fresh water for the new development.
Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unnamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.
979-6667 - Lamplugh Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA. Alaska is home to over 100,000 glaciers, many of them unnamed. The Lamplugh Glacier is named for English Geologist George Lamplugh. Lamplugh Glacier is 150-180 feet above the waterline and 10-40 feet below. The Lamplugh is 3/4 mile wide, 16 miles long, and moving 1200 feet per year.