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1167-1592 - Mendenhall Glacier and Lake, with iceberg, bright blue ice, forest and mist, from Visitor Centre, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1596 - Juneau, State Capital, Mount Roberts Tramway cable car approaches top station, surrounded by forest, Alaksa, USA
1167-1594 - Juneau, State Capital, view from the sea, mist clears over downtown buildings, mountains, forest and float planes, Alaksa, USA
1167-1595 - Juneau, State Capital, view from the sea, mist clears over downtown buildings, mountains, forest and float planes, Alaksa, USA
1167-1593 - Bright blue ice of Mendenhall Glacier flowing from Juneau Ice Field, mist on Mendenhall Lake, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1591 - Forest mist and reflections, Mendenhall Glacier and Lake and Nugget Falls Cascade, Tongass National Forest, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1590 - Blue iceberg, blue ice face of Mendenhall Glacier, elevated view, Visitor Centre, Tongass National Forest, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1589 - Nugget Falls Cascade, elevated view from Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Centre, Tongass National Forest, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1587 - Mendenhall Glacier and Lake, Nugget Falls Cascade, mist, visitors on a beach, Nugget Falls Trail, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1588 - Mist, Mendenhall Glacier and Lake, bright blue ice, Tongass National Forest, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1585 - Mendenhall Glacier and Lake, with iceberg, bright blue ice, forest and mist, from Visitor Centre, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1584 - Bright blue iceberg from Mendenhall Glacier, surrounded by mist on Mendenhall Lake, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1167-1586 - Visitor with outstretched arms on a beach in front of Nugget Falls Cascade, Mendenhall Lake and Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, USA
Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
1218-432 - Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Glacier flowing into bay near Juneau, Alaska.
857-92247 - Glacier flowing into bay near Juneau, Alaska.
Juneau, Capital of Alaska, USA
817-459800 - Juneau, Capital of Alaska, USA
Juneau Street, Capital of Alaska, USA
817-459804 - Juneau Street, Capital of Alaska, USA
Juneau, Capital of Alaska, USA
817-459805 - Juneau, Capital of Alaska, USA
Juneau Street, Capital of Alaska, USA
817-459803 - Juneau Street, Capital of Alaska, USA
Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4268 - Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Mendenhall Glacier Lake, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4266 - Mendenhall Glacier Lake, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Nugget Falls at Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4264 - Nugget Falls at Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4263 - Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4262 - Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Nugget Falls at Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4265 - Nugget Falls at Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Nugget Falls at Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
776-4267 - Nugget Falls at Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Sign, Alaskan Bar, Juneau, Alaska, USA
832-165358 - Sign, Alaskan Bar, Juneau, Alaska, USA
City centre of Juneau, Alaska, USA
832-165354 - City centre of Juneau, Alaska, USA
Cruise ship and seaplane in the harbour of Juneau, Alaska, USA
832-165356 - Cruise ship and seaplane in the harbour of Juneau, Alaska, USA
City centre of Juneau, Alaska, USA
832-165355 - City centre of Juneau, Alaska, USA
Fog-shrouded forest near Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-847 - Fog-shrouded forest near Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
Fog-shrouded forest near Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-849 - Fog-shrouded forest near Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
Lighthouse just north of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-901 - Lighthouse just north of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
Road sign for bear crossing in Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-902 - Road sign for bear crossing in Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
Fog-shrouded forest near Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-848 - Fog-shrouded forest near Juneau, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
A group of people on a glacier tour near Juneau, Alaska, USA
1113-79143 - A group of people on a glacier tour near Juneau, Alaska, USA
Red traffic light and house facade, Juneau, Alaska, USA
1113-79149 - Red traffic light and house facade, Juneau, Alaska, USA
Alaska, Juneau, bald eagle (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) perched upon an old piling.
1116-32464 - Alaska, Juneau, bald eagle (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) perched upon an old piling.
Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier, Tongass National Forest, Mountains reflect in a mountain lake.
1116-34718 - Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier, Tongass National Forest, Mountains reflect in a mountain lake.
Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier, Nordic skier stands on cliff at sunset B1661
1116-38308 - Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier, Nordic skier stands on cliff at sunset B1661
Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
1116-28327 - Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
1116-28328 - Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
1116-28325 - Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier, Tongass National Forest, Mountains reflect in a mountain lake.
1116-34715 - Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier, Tongass National Forest, Mountains reflect in a mountain lake.
Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Valley, Tongass National Forest, field of fireweed.
1116-34711 - Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Valley, Tongass National Forest, field of fireweed.
Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Valley, Tongass National Forest, field of fireweed.
1116-34710 - Alaska, Juneau, Mendenhall Valley, Tongass National Forest, field of fireweed.
Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
1116-28326 - Alaska, Juneau, Favorite Passage. Kayaking through beautiful mountain ranges.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6850 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
Spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), also called red salmon or blueback salmon gathering to run upstream in the Mendenhall River just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The sockeye is an anadromous species of salmon found only in the Pacific Ocean. Sockeye salmon spawn mostly in streams having lakes in their watershed. The young fish, known as fry, spend from zero to three years in the freshwater lake before migrating to the ocean, some stay in the lake and do not migrate to the sea. The fish that migrate spend from one to four years in the salt water, and thus are four to six years old when they return to spawn in summer (July-August). Migration back to the home river is thought to be done using the characteristic smell of the stream, and possibly the sun. It is the third most common species of Pacific salmon, after Pink and Chum salmon.
979-6739 - Spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), also called red salmon or blueback salmon gathering to run upstream in the Mendenhall River just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The sockeye is an anadromous species of salmon found only in the Pacific Ocean. Sockeye salmon spawn mostly in streams having lakes in their watershed. The young fish, known as fry, spend from zero to three years in the freshwater lake before migrating to the ocean, some stay in the lake and do not migrate to the sea. The fish that migrate spend from one to four years in the salt water, and thus are four to six years old when they return to spawn in summer (July-August). Migration back to the home river is thought to be done using the characteristic smell of the stream, and possibly the sun. It is the third most common species of Pacific salmon, after Pink and Chum salmon.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6537 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Cruise ships line the docks after sunset in downtown Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6498 - Cruise ships line the docks after sunset in downtown Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
Views of Mendenhall Glacier just outside Juneau, southeast Alaska, USA. This glacier is receeding at an alarming rate, probably due to climate change.
979-3399 - Views of Mendenhall Glacier just outside Juneau, southeast Alaska, USA. This glacier is receeding at an alarming rate, probably due to climate change.
Adult American Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) taking flight near Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-1992 - Adult American Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) taking flight near Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6856 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6534 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6849 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
South Sawyer Glacier calving in Tracy Arm - Fords Terror Wilderness area in Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
979-8183 - South Sawyer Glacier calving in Tracy Arm - Fords Terror Wilderness area in Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
Whale watchers on the bow of a commercial whale watching operation looking for humpback whales in Stephen's Passage just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska. No model or property releases.
979-2327 - Whale watchers on the bow of a commercial whale watching operation looking for humpback whales in Stephen's Passage just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska. No model or property releases.
Views of Mendenhall Glacier just outside Juneau, southeast Alaska, USA. This glacier is receeding at an alarming rate, probably due to climate change.
979-3401 - Views of Mendenhall Glacier just outside Juneau, southeast Alaska, USA. This glacier is receeding at an alarming rate, probably due to climate change.
The commercial whale watching vessel "Orca Odyssey", based in Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. In the summer of 2006 this vessel struck a humpback whale while on a commercial whale watch.
979-2328 - The commercial whale watching vessel "Orca Odyssey", based in Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. In the summer of 2006 this vessel struck a humpback whale while on a commercial whale watch.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6533 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
979-8061 - Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
A mother black bear (Ursus americanus) with two coy (cubs of year) near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
979-7023 - A mother black bear (Ursus americanus) with two coy (cubs of year) near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
An aerial view of Auke Bay just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6513 - An aerial view of Auke Bay just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
Aerial view of the Glass Peninsula and North Pass just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6516 - Aerial view of the Glass Peninsula and North Pass just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6855 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
A female black bear (Ursus americanus)  fishing for sockeye salmon near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
979-7026 - A female black bear (Ursus americanus) fishing for sockeye salmon near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6531 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
A female black bear (Ursus americanus)  fishing for sockeye salmon near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
979-7025 - A female black bear (Ursus americanus) fishing for sockeye salmon near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
979-8057 - Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
Aerial view of the Glass Peninsula just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6515 - Aerial view of the Glass Peninsula just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6853 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
Views of Mendenhall Glacier just outside Juneau, southeast Alaska, USA. This glacier is receeding at an alarming rate, probably due to climate change.
979-3400 - Views of Mendenhall Glacier just outside Juneau, southeast Alaska, USA. This glacier is receeding at an alarming rate, probably due to climate change.
A mother black bear (Ursus americanus) with two coy (cubs of year) near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
979-7024 - A mother black bear (Ursus americanus) with two coy (cubs of year) near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging along the streambed for red (sockeye) salmon returning to spawn near Mendenhal Glacier just outside of Juneau, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother.
979-1055 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging along the streambed for red (sockeye) salmon returning to spawn near Mendenhal Glacier just outside of Juneau, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6518 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging along the streambed for red (sockeye) salmon returning to spawn near Mendenhal Glacier just outside of Juneau, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother.
979-1056 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging along the streambed for red (sockeye) salmon returning to spawn near Mendenhal Glacier just outside of Juneau, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6523 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Rainbow in Ford's Terror, Southeast Alaska, USA. MORE INFO Ford's Terror is a very steep and narrow fjord 60 miles southeast of Juneau in Alaska's Inside Passage. It lies within the Tracy Arm-Ford's Terror Wilderness. Ford's Terror is named after the naval crew member who, in 1889, rowed a dinghy into the narrow entrance of the fjord at slack tide.
979-7988 - Rainbow in Ford's Terror, Southeast Alaska, USA. MORE INFO Ford's Terror is a very steep and narrow fjord 60 miles southeast of Juneau in Alaska's Inside Passage. It lies within the Tracy Arm-Ford's Terror Wilderness. Ford's Terror is named after the naval crew member who, in 1889, rowed a dinghy into the narrow entrance of the fjord at slack tide.
Low clouds and dramatic light on a commercial flight between Sitka and Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6511 - Low clouds and dramatic light on a commercial flight between Sitka and Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
Spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), also called red salmon or blueback salmon gathering to run upstream in the Mendenhall River just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The sockeye is an anadromous species of salmon found only in the Pacific Ocean. Sockeye salmon spawn mostly in streams having lakes in their watershed. The young fish, known as fry, spend from zero to three years in the freshwater lake before migrating to the ocean, some stay in the lake and do not migrate to the sea. The fish that migrate spend from one to four years in the salt water, and thus are four to six years old when they return to spawn in summer (July-August). Migration back to the home river is thought to be done using the characteristic smell of the stream, and possibly the sun. It is the third most common species of Pacific salmon, after Pink and Chum salmon.
979-6740 - Spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), also called red salmon or blueback salmon gathering to run upstream in the Mendenhall River just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The sockeye is an anadromous species of salmon found only in the Pacific Ocean. Sockeye salmon spawn mostly in streams having lakes in their watershed. The young fish, known as fry, spend from zero to three years in the freshwater lake before migrating to the ocean, some stay in the lake and do not migrate to the sea. The fish that migrate spend from one to four years in the salt water, and thus are four to six years old when they return to spawn in summer (July-August). Migration back to the home river is thought to be done using the characteristic smell of the stream, and possibly the sun. It is the third most common species of Pacific salmon, after Pink and Chum salmon.
Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
979-8059 - Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6526 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6527 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6852 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
The Point Retreat Lighthouse just outside of Juneau, on Admiralty Island, southeast Alaska, USA.
979-2542 - The Point Retreat Lighthouse just outside of Juneau, on Admiralty Island, southeast Alaska, USA.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6854 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6530 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6535 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6522 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Low clouds and dramatic light on a commercial flight between Sitka and Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Shown here is the approach to Juneau Airport with Mendenhall Glacier in the background.
979-6512 - Low clouds and dramatic light on a commercial flight between Sitka and Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Shown here is the approach to Juneau Airport with Mendenhall Glacier in the background.
Spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), also called red salmon or blueback salmon gathering to run upstream in the Mendenhall River just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The sockeye is an anadromous species of salmon found only in the Pacific Ocean. Sockeye salmon spawn mostly in streams having lakes in their watershed. The young fish, known as fry, spend from zero to three years in the freshwater lake before migrating to the ocean, some stay in the lake and do not migrate to the sea. The fish that migrate spend from one to four years in the salt water, and thus are four to six years old when they return to spawn in summer (July-August). Migration back to the home river is thought to be done using the characteristic smell of the stream, and possibly the sun. It is the third most common species of Pacific salmon, after Pink and Chum salmon.
979-6741 - Spawning sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), also called red salmon or blueback salmon gathering to run upstream in the Mendenhall River just outside Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The sockeye is an anadromous species of salmon found only in the Pacific Ocean. Sockeye salmon spawn mostly in streams having lakes in their watershed. The young fish, known as fry, spend from zero to three years in the freshwater lake before migrating to the ocean, some stay in the lake and do not migrate to the sea. The fish that migrate spend from one to four years in the salt water, and thus are four to six years old when they return to spawn in summer (July-August). Migration back to the home river is thought to be done using the characteristic smell of the stream, and possibly the sun. It is the third most common species of Pacific salmon, after Pink and Chum salmon.
Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
979-8062 - Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
979-8060 - Glacial iceberg detail from ice calved off the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after a Civil War general named Benjamin Franklin Tracy.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6524 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
Aerial view of peninsula just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6514 - Aerial view of peninsula just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
979-6529 - Aerial views of snow-capped mountains, ice fields, and glaciers on a commercial flight from Juneau to Anchorage Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Alaska has hosted a glacier-favoring mixture of climate and topography for the last 12.5 million years. During the Pleistocene age, when the climate was 3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit colder than it is today, an ice sheet covered a large expanse of the earth, including the islands of southeastern Alaska. Today there are still over 100,000 glaciers in Alaska, although ice covers only 5 percent of the state. The icefields and glaciers of the Tongass National Forest are some of the few remnants of the once-vast ice sheets.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6851 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
Low clouds and dramatic light on a commercial flight between Sitka and Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-6510 - Low clouds and dramatic light on a commercial flight between Sitka and Juneau in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
A female black bear (Ursus americanus)  fishing for sockeye salmon near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).
979-7027 - A female black bear (Ursus americanus) fishing for sockeye salmon near Mendenhall Glacier outside of Juneau, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds).