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Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) eating a Salmon in water, Alaska
860-287469 - Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) eating a Salmon in water, Alaska
Leopard In Tree Licking Lips While Feeding On Wildebeest Calf Near Ndutu, Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area, Tanzania
1116-43464 - Leopard In Tree Licking Lips While Feeding On Wildebeest Calf Near Ndutu, Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area, Tanzania
Leopard In Tree Licking Lips While Feeding On Wildebeest Calf Near Ndutu, Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area, Tanzania
1116-43463 - Leopard In Tree Licking Lips While Feeding On Wildebeest Calf Near Ndutu, Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area, Tanzania
A pride of lions, Panthera leo, lie over a buffalo carcass, Syncerus caffer, looking away, biting muzzle of bloated buffalo, blood on mouth, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5200 - A pride of lions, Panthera leo, lie over a buffalo carcass, Syncerus caffer, looking away, biting muzzle of bloated buffalo, blood on mouth, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A leopard, Panthera pardus, stands in a tree over a carcass, alert, blood on nose and snout, ears up, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5016 - A leopard, Panthera pardus, stands in a tree over a carcass, alert, blood on nose and snout, ears up, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A close up of a lion's mouth and paw, Panthera leo, linking paw, raised foot, bloody muzzle, tongue barbs visible, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5110 - A close up of a lion's mouth and paw, Panthera leo, linking paw, raised foot, bloody muzzle, tongue barbs visible, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A leopard, Panthera pardus, stands while holding a dead warthog in its mouth, Phacochoerus africanus, blood on its neck, at night lit up by spotlight, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5015 - A leopard, Panthera pardus, stands while holding a dead warthog in its mouth, Phacochoerus africanus, blood on its neck, at night lit up by spotlight, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta, stand together at an elephant carcass, Loxodonta africana, blood on chest, looking away, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5021 - Two spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta, stand together at an elephant carcass, Loxodonta africana, blood on chest, looking away, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two fighting Burchell's Zebras, (Equus quagga burchellii), Etosha National Park, Namibia, Africa
832-381355 - Two fighting Burchell's Zebras, (Equus quagga burchellii), Etosha National Park, Namibia, Africa
Two fighting Burchell's Zebras, (Equus quagga burchellii), Etosha National Park, Namibia, Africa
832-381293 - Two fighting Burchell's Zebras, (Equus quagga burchellii), Etosha National Park, Namibia, Africa
Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also steinbock or Ibex, fighting for rank, High Tauern National Park, Carinthia, Austria, Europe
832-379367 - Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also steinbock or Ibex, fighting for rank, High Tauern National Park, Carinthia, Austria, Europe
Brown bear (Ursus arctos), two female bears fighting, with young, Kamchatka, Russia, Europe
832-379362 - Brown bear (Ursus arctos), two female bears fighting, with young, Kamchatka, Russia, Europe
Two male lions (Panthera leo), son and father fighting for dominance, Masai Mara, Narok County, Kenya, Africa
832-379631 - Two male lions (Panthera leo), son and father fighting for dominance, Masai Mara, Narok County, Kenya, Africa
Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also steinbock or Ibex, fighting for rank, High Tauern National Park, Carinthia, Austria, Europe
832-379366 - Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also steinbock or Ibex, fighting for rank, High Tauern National Park, Carinthia, Austria, Europe
Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also steinbock or Ibex, fighting for rank, High Tauern National Park, Carinthia, Austria, Europe
832-379368 - Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also steinbock or Ibex, fighting for rank, High Tauern National Park, Carinthia, Austria, Europe
Lioness With Bloody Face Following Killing Of Prey, Africa
1116-41000 - Lioness With Bloody Face Following Killing Of Prey, Africa
Gray wolf (Canis lupus) 870F of the Junction Butte Pack at an elk carcass in the winter, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, United States of America, North America
764-4985 - Gray wolf (Canis lupus) 870F of the Junction Butte Pack at an elk carcass in the winter, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, United States of America, North America
Portrait of Walrus resting on iceberg, Hudson Bay Canada
860-284290 - Portrait of Walrus resting on iceberg, Hudson Bay Canada
The Muni Seva Ashram in Goraj, near Vadodara, India, is a tranquil haven of humanitarian care. The Ashram is hugely sustainable, next year it will be completely carbon neutral. Its first solar panels were installed in 1984, long before climate change was on anyones agenda. Their energy is provided from solar panels, and wood grown on the estate. Waste food and animal manure is turned inot biogas to run the estates cars and also used for cooking. Solar cookers are also used, and the air conditioning for the hospital is solar run. 70 % of the food used is grown on the estate. They provide an orphanage, schools for all ages, vocational training, care for the elderly, a specialist cancer hospital withstate of the art machinary, and even have a solar crematorium. This shot shows a Hematology Analyzer for analyzing blood in one of the labs in the specialist cancer hospital.
911-10635 - The Muni Seva Ashram in Goraj, near Vadodara, India, is a tranquil haven of humanitarian care. The Ashram is hugely sustainable, next year it will be completely carbon neutral. Its first solar panels were installed in 1984, long before climate change was on anyones agenda. Their energy is provided from solar panels, and wood grown on the estate. Waste food and animal manure is turned inot biogas to run the estates cars and also used for cooking. Solar cookers are also used, and the air conditioning for the hospital is solar run. 70 % of the food used is grown on the estate. They provide an orphanage, schools for all ages, vocational training, care for the elderly, a specialist cancer hospital withstate of the art machinary, and even have a solar crematorium. This shot shows a Hematology Analyzer for analyzing blood in one of the labs in the specialist cancer hospital.
Lions (Panthera leo) on a captured elephant, Savuti, Chobe national park, Botswana, Africa
832-367321 - Lions (Panthera leo) on a captured elephant, Savuti, Chobe national park, Botswana, Africa
Male lion (Panthera leo) is eating a captured elephant, Savuti, Chobe national park, Botswana, Africa
832-367322 - Male lion (Panthera leo) is eating a captured elephant, Savuti, Chobe national park, Botswana, Africa
Bloody cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
1173-4210 - Bloody cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
Bloody king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, injured by sea lion, South Georgia Island,
1173-2650 - Bloody king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, injured by sea lion, South Georgia Island,
Cheetah at kill, Acinonyx jubatus, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
1173-4211 - Cheetah at kill, Acinonyx jubatus, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
Black-backed jackal (silver-backed jackal) (Canis mesomelas) at a blue wildebeest calf kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-4177 - Black-backed jackal (silver-backed jackal) (Canis mesomelas) at a blue wildebeest calf kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) family at a kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-4206 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) family at a kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Ruppell's griffon vulture (Gyps rueppellii) approaches a black-backed jackal (silver-backed jackal) (Canis mesomelas) at a blue wildebeest calf kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-4178 - Ruppell's griffon vulture (Gyps rueppellii) approaches a black-backed jackal (silver-backed jackal) (Canis mesomelas) at a blue wildebeest calf kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) family at a kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-4207 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) family at a kill, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Dead hedgehog on country road, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
1161-2163 - Dead hedgehog on country road, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
deer ked dorsal view Germany Europe
869-4603 - deer ked dorsal view Germany Europe
deer ked portrait Germany Europe
869-4604 - deer ked portrait Germany Europe
Polar Bear Portrait, Greenland.
817-441375 - Polar Bear Portrait, Greenland.
Andy Cartagena, bullfighter on horseback spanish, Jaen, Spain, 13 october 2008
817-438796 - Andy Cartagena, bullfighter on horseback spanish, Jaen, Spain, 13 october 2008
Toad Survived snake attack.
817-436153 - Toad Survived snake attack.
Polar bear Ursus maritimus, Greenland Polar Bear on the ice with blood from his last meal, a seal
817-425748 - Polar bear Ursus maritimus, Greenland Polar Bear on the ice with blood from his last meal, a seal
A Closeup of a tick (Ixodes ricinus)
832-17961 - A Closeup of a tick (Ixodes ricinus)
Sheep tick or castor bean tick (Ixodes ricinus) with full blood bag on withered wood
832-29142 - Sheep tick or castor bean tick (Ixodes ricinus) with full blood bag on withered wood
Cheetah (Acynonix jubatus), Kalahari plains, Namibia, Africa
843-329 - Cheetah (Acynonix jubatus), Kalahari plains, Namibia, Africa
An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) in Neko Harbor, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4950 - An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) in Neko Harbor, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8586 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8602 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8616 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8615 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8606 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8597 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8661 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8613 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8587 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8599 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8595 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8591 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8609 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5354 - A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8659 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A young polar bear (Ursus maritimus) feeds on a seal carcass recently vacated by a mother and her two coy (cubs-of-year) on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5361 - A young polar bear (Ursus maritimus) feeds on a seal carcass recently vacated by a mother and her two coy (cubs-of-year) on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8660 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8596 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8585 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8598 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a frshly killed ringed seal on multi-year ice floes in the Storfjord Region of the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8566 - Adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a frshly killed ringed seal on multi-year ice floes in the Storfjord Region of the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a frshly killed ringed seal on multi-year ice floes in the Storfjord Region of the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8653 - Adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a frshly killed ringed seal on multi-year ice floes in the Storfjord Region of the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4939 - Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8614 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8658 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) in Neko Harbor, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4949 - An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) in Neko Harbor, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8593 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8611 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8662 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) defending a fresh bearded seal kill against a younger intruder near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8589 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) defending a fresh bearded seal kill against a younger intruder near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8600 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8583 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8605 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8601 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) nesting and incubating two eggs at Gabriel Gonzales Videla Research Station, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4947 - An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) nesting and incubating two eggs at Gabriel Gonzales Videla Research Station, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) nesting and incubating two eggs at Gabriel Gonzales Videla Research Station, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4948 - An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) nesting and incubating two eggs at Gabriel Gonzales Videla Research Station, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8607 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) defending a fresh bearded seal kill against a younger intruder near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8590 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) defending a fresh bearded seal kill against a younger intruder near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8683 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8604 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) defending a fresh bearded seal kill against a younger intruder near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8588 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) defending a fresh bearded seal kill against a younger intruder near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5356 - A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8612 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8684 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8592 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5355 - A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Kükenthaløya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8610 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8584 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8608 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of K?kenthal¯ya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5353 - A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) waits nearby while her two coy (cubs-of-year) feast on a seal carcass on fast ice in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of K?kenthal¯ya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8617 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8685 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8594 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) nesting and incubating two eggs at Gabriel Gonzales Videla Research Station, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4946 - An adult Leucistic Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) nesting and incubating two eggs at Gabriel Gonzales Videla Research Station, Antarctica. Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes.The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Deinonychus attacks Iguanodon in Leba Park dinosaur theme park, Poland
817-364086 - Deinonychus attacks Iguanodon in Leba Park dinosaur theme park, Poland
Lioness with cubs (Panthera leo) on warthog kill, Kwandwe private reserve, Eastern Cape, South Africa, Africa
743-870 - Lioness with cubs (Panthera leo) on warthog kill, Kwandwe private reserve, Eastern Cape, South Africa, Africa
Lion cub (Panthera leo) on kill, Kwandwe private reserve, Eastern Cape, South Africa, Africa
743-869 - Lion cub (Panthera leo) on kill, Kwandwe private reserve, Eastern Cape, South Africa, Africa
Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) with a captured catfish, Chobe River, Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa
832-4075 - Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) with a captured catfish, Chobe River, Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa
Sheep - or Castor Bean Tick (Ixodes ricinus), engorged, close-up
832-7075 - Sheep - or Castor Bean Tick (Ixodes ricinus), engorged, close-up
Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with prey, Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus albojubatus), young animal, Masai Mara, national park, Kenya, East Africa
832-1623 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with prey, Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus albojubatus), young animal, Masai Mara, national park, Kenya, East Africa
Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with prey, Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus albojubatus), young animal, Masai Mara, national park, Kenya, East Africa
832-1621 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with prey, Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus albojubatus), young animal, Masai Mara, national park, Kenya, East Africa