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Two Black Bears In A Forest In Summer, Southcentral Alaska, USA
1116-46327 - Two Black Bears In A Forest In Summer, Southcentral Alaska, USA
Juvenile Rufescent Tiger Heron (Tigrisoma Lineatum) Stretching It's Wings, Mato Grosso Do Sul, Brazil
1116-46241 - Juvenile Rufescent Tiger Heron (Tigrisoma Lineatum) Stretching It's Wings, Mato Grosso Do Sul, Brazil
A Scarred Brown Bear Stands To Scratch His Back Along Brooks River, Katmai National Park, Southwest Alaska
1116-44946 - A Scarred Brown Bear Stands To Scratch His Back Along Brooks River, Katmai National Park, Southwest Alaska
A Scarred Brown Bear Stands To Scratch His Back Along Brooks River, Katmai National Park, Southwest Alaska
1116-44942 - A Scarred Brown Bear Stands To Scratch His Back Along Brooks River, Katmai National Park, Southwest Alaska
Female Cheetah (Acinonyx Jubatus) Rubs Against Tree Trunk And Yawns With Open Mouth While Young Cub Lies At Her Feet Near Ndutu, Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area, Tanzania
1116-43930 - Female Cheetah (Acinonyx Jubatus) Rubs Against Tree Trunk And Yawns With Open Mouth While Young Cub Lies At Her Feet Near Ndutu, Ngorongoro Crater Conservation Area, Tanzania
Feet of Red rock crab (Grapsus grapsus) cling to volcanic rock, family of marsh crabs (Grapsidae), island Floreana, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, South America
832-383748 - Feet of Red rock crab (Grapsus grapsus) cling to volcanic rock, family of marsh crabs (Grapsidae), island Floreana, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, South America
A lioness, Panthera leo, lies on sand, head resting on feet, alert, greenery in background, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5012 - A lioness, Panthera leo, lies on sand, head resting on feet, alert, greenery in background, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A pack of wild dog, Lycaon pictus, running, ears back, feet off the ground, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5232 - A pack of wild dog, Lycaon pictus, running, ears back, feet off the ground, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A leopard, Panthera pardus, lies on a broken tree branch, drapes its feet and tail over the branch, looking away, ears back, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4971 - A leopard, Panthera pardus, lies on a broken tree branch, drapes its feet and tail over the branch, looking away, ears back, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
An Elephant's Face Trunk And Ears Decorated With Paint With A Barefoot Showing Under The Ear, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
1116-41990 - An Elephant's Face Trunk And Ears Decorated With Paint With A Barefoot Showing Under The Ear, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Snorkeler under the glass floor in a room of bora bora nui resort and spa, Bora bora island society islands french polynesia south pacific
1116-41966 - Snorkeler under the glass floor in a room of bora bora nui resort and spa, Bora bora island society islands french polynesia south pacific
Glass floor in a room of bora bora nui resort and spa, Bora bora island society islands french polynesia south pacific
1116-41967 - Glass floor in a room of bora bora nui resort and spa, Bora bora island society islands french polynesia south pacific
Blue-footed booby feet (Sula nebouxii), Punta Pitt, San Cristobal (Chatham) Island, Galapagos, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Ecuador, South America
1245-1294 - Blue-footed booby feet (Sula nebouxii), Punta Pitt, San Cristobal (Chatham) Island, Galapagos, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Ecuador, South America
Giant tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra) are the largest living species of tortoise that can grow up to 880 pounds and reach more than 6 feet in length, Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
1116-41401 - Giant tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra) are the largest living species of tortoise that can grow up to 880 pounds and reach more than 6 feet in length, Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
Hawaii, United States Of America, Red-Footed Booby (Sula Sula) Pitches Forward In Flight With Tail Feathers And Feet Flared For Braking
1116-41350 - Hawaii, United States Of America, Red-Footed Booby (Sula Sula) Pitches Forward In Flight With Tail Feathers And Feet Flared For Braking
Both a Crinoid Commensal Shrimp (Periclimenes cornutus) and a Crinoid Squat Lobster (Allogalathea elegans) on a crinoid. These tiny crustaceans are commensal on crinoids or feather stars and take their color from the host, Philippines
1116-39729 - Both a Crinoid Commensal Shrimp (Periclimenes cornutus) and a Crinoid Squat Lobster (Allogalathea elegans) on a crinoid. These tiny crustaceans are commensal on crinoids or feather stars and take their color from the host, Philippines
Bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) are the largest species in this family and can reach 5 feet in length and over 160 pounds, Yap, Micronesia
1116-39950 - Bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) are the largest species in this family and can reach 5 feet in length and over 160 pounds, Yap, Micronesia
Deepwater Longtail Red Snapper (Etelis coruscans), is also called Ruby Snapper or Scarlet Snapper, but is better known by its Japanese name, Onaga. This fish lives in depths ranging from 700 to 900 feet, Yap, Micronesia
1116-39955 - Deepwater Longtail Red Snapper (Etelis coruscans), is also called Ruby Snapper or Scarlet Snapper, but is better known by its Japanese name, Onaga. This fish lives in depths ranging from 700 to 900 feet, Yap, Micronesia
Adult blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii), feet detail on San Cristobal Island, Galapagos, Ecuador, South America
1112-3460 - Adult blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii), feet detail on San Cristobal Island, Galapagos, Ecuador, South America
Australia Sea Lion
1172-1907 - Australia Sea Lion
Hooded vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) in flight on approach to landing, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5143 - Hooded vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) in flight on approach to landing, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, head breaching calf with smooth, light gray color characteristic of a newborn, approximately 12 feet in length and weighing upwards of two tons, Hawaii, USA, Pacific Ocean
983-641 - humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, head breaching calf with smooth, light gray color characteristic of a newborn, approximately 12 feet in length and weighing upwards of two tons, Hawaii, USA, Pacific Ocean
African jacana (Actophilornis africanus), Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa
741-4815 - African jacana (Actophilornis africanus), Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa
Young Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), baby, Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
832-374883 - Young Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), baby, Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Footprint of a hippopotamus
832-369378 - Footprint of a hippopotamus
Red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Barro Colorado Island, Panama
1174-1302 - Red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Barro Colorado Island, Panama
Red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Barro Colorado Island, Panama
1174-1303 - Red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Barro Colorado Island, Panama
Red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Barro Colorado Island, Panama
1174-1301 - Red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Barro Colorado Island, Panama
Emperor penguin with chick on feet, Aptenodytes forsteri, Weddell Sea, Antarctica
1173-4359 - Emperor penguin with chick on feet, Aptenodytes forsteri, Weddell Sea, Antarctica
Blue-footed booby feet, Sula nebouxii, Galapagos Islands
1173-3729 - Blue-footed booby feet, Sula nebouxii, Galapagos Islands
Emperor penguin chick on parent's feet, Aptenodytes forsteri, Antarctica
1173-4347 - Emperor penguin chick on parent's feet, Aptenodytes forsteri, Antarctica
Chicken family hen, cockerel and chicks at Ferme de l'Eglise, Houesville, Normandy, France
1161-7217 - Chicken family hen, cockerel and chicks at Ferme de l'Eglise, Houesville, Normandy, France
Indian Black Kite raptor bird, Milvus Migrans, in the sky above Lake Pichola in first light of early morning, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
1161-5210 - Indian Black Kite raptor bird, Milvus Migrans, in the sky above Lake Pichola in first light of early morning, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
Pair of adult llamas, one male one female, at Ferme de l'Eglise, Normandy, France
1161-7214 - Pair of adult llamas, one male one female, at Ferme de l'Eglise, Normandy, France
Pair of adult llamas, one male one female, at Ferme de l'Eglise, Normandy, France
1161-7215 - Pair of adult llamas, one male one female, at Ferme de l'Eglise, Normandy, France
Chicken at Ferme de l'Eglise, Houesville, Normandy, France
1161-7216 - Chicken at Ferme de l'Eglise, Houesville, Normandy, France
Chicken family hen, cockerel and chicks at Ferme de l'Eglise, Houesville, Normandy, France
1161-7218 - Chicken family hen, cockerel and chicks at Ferme de l'Eglise, Houesville, Normandy, France
Cormorant, Everglades, Florida, United States of America
1161-4042 - Cormorant, Everglades, Florida, United States of America
Cormorant, Everglades, Florida, United States of America
1161-4043 - Cormorant, Everglades, Florida, United States of America
Red-legged French Partridge, UK
1161-3979 - Red-legged French Partridge, UK
Red-legged partridge also known as French partridge on  dry stone wall in The Cotswolds, Oxfordshire, England, UK
1161-3983 - Red-legged partridge also known as French partridge on dry stone wall in The Cotswolds, Oxfordshire, England, UK
Horse sculpture lifesize in fibreglass, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
1161-2048 - Horse sculpture lifesize in fibreglass, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Blue-footed Booby bird on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador  with a pair of young birds
1161-487 - Blue-footed Booby bird on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador with a pair of young birds
Falcon in Bahrain with Jesses around its feet
1161-610 - Falcon in Bahrain with Jesses around its feet
Mallard ducklings just a few days old, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, England
1161-179 - Mallard ducklings just a few days old, Swinbrook, Oxfordshire, England
Blue-footed Booby bird on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador  sheltering young chicks
1161-673 - Blue-footed Booby bird on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador sheltering young chicks
Blue-footed Booby juvenile birds on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
1161-491 - Blue-footed Booby juvenile birds on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
Elephant feet, hunting trophies in the Reunification Palace, Reunion Hall, former seat of government, Ho Chi Minh City, Saigon, South Vietnam, Vietnam, Southeast Asia, Asia
832-102910 - Elephant feet, hunting trophies in the Reunification Palace, Reunion Hall, former seat of government, Ho Chi Minh City, Saigon, South Vietnam, Vietnam, Southeast Asia, Asia
Boots with spurs of a rodeo cowboy at work.
857-52147 - Boots with spurs of a rodeo cowboy at work.
Foot of a Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) on the bank of the Chobe River, Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa
832-18708 - Foot of a Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) on the bank of the Chobe River, Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa
Tiger footprint, female, bandhavgargh, india.
1193-177 - Tiger footprint, female, bandhavgargh, india.
Spurge Hawkmoth (Hyles euphorbiae) close-up of final instar fully grown larva showing pattern and colors
1198-455 - Spurge Hawkmoth (Hyles euphorbiae) close-up of final instar fully grown larva showing pattern and colors
Claws of bald eagle, haliaeetus leucocephalus, weisskopfseeadler, homer, kenai peninsula, alaska, usa
1190-585 - Claws of bald eagle, haliaeetus leucocephalus, weisskopfseeadler, homer, kenai peninsula, alaska, usa
Gentoo penguin (pygoscelis papua) ocean harbour, south georgia, standing on snow, close-up of feet.
1198-310 - Gentoo penguin (pygoscelis papua) ocean harbour, south georgia, standing on snow, close-up of feet.
humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, head breaching calf with smooth, light gray color characteristic of a newborn, approximately 12 feet in length and weighing upwards of two tons, Hawaii, USA, Pacific Ocean
983-30 - humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, head breaching calf with smooth, light gray color characteristic of a newborn, approximately 12 feet in length and weighing upwards of two tons, Hawaii, USA, Pacific Ocean
Short-finned Pilot Whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) & whale-watchers. It is by law that whale watchers should stay at least 50meters (150 feet) away from large whales, including Pilot Whale (in picture here).  Unless special in-water permits are given, snorkelers can only swim with smaller dolphins, but not big whales. Azores, Portugal, Atlantic.
1012-77 - Short-finned Pilot Whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) & whale-watchers. It is by law that whale watchers should stay at least 50meters (150 feet) away from large whales, including Pilot Whale (in picture here). Unless special in-water permits are given, snorkelers can only swim with smaller dolphins, but not big whales. Azores, Portugal, Atlantic.
Blue Whale (Balaenoptera Musculus) adult animal fluking. Monterey, California, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The fluke of an adult Blue Whale can be over 20 feet across.
917-343 - Blue Whale (Balaenoptera Musculus) adult animal fluking. Monterey, California, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: The fluke of an adult Blue Whale can be over 20 feet across.
Adult Galapagos land snake (Philodryas spp) which is a mildly poisonous and a constrictor. MORE INFO: It's a small snake, at only a bit over three feet, but it can catch prey up to 4 or 5 feet long. It eats insects, lizards, small birds, and baby marine iguanas. Its coloration is brown with yellow stripes or dark gray with yellow spots. The origin of this snake, which is of the Colubrideae family and the Philodryas genus, is the Caribbean. There are actually eight different subspecies on the Galapagos Islands
979-6190 - Adult Galapagos land snake (Philodryas spp) which is a mildly poisonous and a constrictor. MORE INFO: It's a small snake, at only a bit over three feet, but it can catch prey up to 4 or 5 feet long. It eats insects, lizards, small birds, and baby marine iguanas. Its coloration is brown with yellow stripes or dark gray with yellow spots. The origin of this snake, which is of the Colubrideae family and the Philodryas genus, is the Caribbean. There are actually eight different subspecies on the Galapagos Islands
Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6881 - Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4522 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6944 - Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4637 - Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sub-surface feeding off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. MORE INFO At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
979-8013 - A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sub-surface feeding off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. MORE INFO At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
Mother with single cub brown bear (Ursus arctos) playing in the water at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6876 - Mother with single cub brown bear (Ursus arctos) playing in the water at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4512 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6883 - Mother brown bear (Ursus arctos) with cub-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Adult Antarctic Shag, (Phalacrocorax (atriceps) bransfieldensis) from breeding colony on the Antarctic Peninsula. It is also known as the Blue-eyed Shag and by many other names, and is one of a larger group of cormorants called blue-eyed shags. The taxonomy is very complex, and several subspecies are often considered separate species instead. The blue-eyed shags are a group of closely related cormorant taxa. All have a blue, purple or red ring around the eye (not a blue iris); other shared features are white underparts (at least in some individuals) and pink feet.
979-4796 - Adult Antarctic Shag, (Phalacrocorax (atriceps) bransfieldensis) from breeding colony on the Antarctic Peninsula. It is also known as the Blue-eyed Shag and by many other names, and is one of a larger group of cormorants called blue-eyed shags. The taxonomy is very complex, and several subspecies are often considered separate species instead. The blue-eyed shags are a group of closely related cormorant taxa. All have a blue, purple or red ring around the eye (not a blue iris); other shared features are white underparts (at least in some individuals) and pink feet.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4650 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) fluke-up dive off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. This animal was sighted at almost 80 degrees north latitude. At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
979-5074 - A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) fluke-up dive off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. This animal was sighted at almost 80 degrees north latitude. At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
Mother and cub brown bear (Ursus arctos) walking the beach at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6910 - Mother and cub brown bear (Ursus arctos) walking the beach at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4505 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
A rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sub-surface feeding off the edge of the continental shelf on the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago,  Norway. MORE INFO At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed. Since protection efforts the blue whale is starting to make a recovery in the north Atlantic.
979-8733 - A rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sub-surface feeding off the edge of the continental shelf on the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed. Since protection efforts the blue whale is starting to make a recovery in the north Atlantic.
A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify.  The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6857 - A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6569 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) with two cubs-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6877 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) with two cubs-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
979-6850 - A young black bear (Ursus americanus) foraging near Mendenhall Glacier Park just outside of Juneau, on the Alaska mainland in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This young bear is probably only recently weaned from its mother. The Alaskan black bear has its own sub-species name: Ursus americanus emmonsii. The black bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (5 to 6 feet) and typically stands about 76 to 91 cm (2.5 to 3 feet) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall (2.12 m). Males are 33% larger than females. Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds). Adult black bears can reach 300 kg (660 pounds), but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). Today, a major threat to the black bears is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls, hearts, and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea.
Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) close-up eating a halibut in Southeastern Alaska, USA. MORE INFO: This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6966 - Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) close-up eating a halibut in Southeastern Alaska, USA. MORE INFO: This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for spawning sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6915 - Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for spawning sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify.  The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6861 - A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for dying sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6894 - Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for dying sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4507 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Two curious brown bear cubs (Ursus arctos), probably just recently weened, inspecting and gnawing on park ranger and service boats at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6940 - Two curious brown bear cubs (Ursus arctos), probably just recently weened, inspecting and gnawing on park ranger and service boats at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6899 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) mock fighting with her two-year old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6564 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4540 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) with two cubs-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6879 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) with two cubs-of-year (COY) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for dying sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6924 - Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for dying sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4667 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify.  The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6859 - A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sub-surface feeding off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. MORE INFO At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
979-8014 - A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sub-surface feeding off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. MORE INFO At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
Two curious brown bear cubs (Ursus arctos), probably just recently weened, inspecting and gnawing on park ranger and service boats at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6938 - Two curious brown bear cubs (Ursus arctos), probably just recently weened, inspecting and gnawing on park ranger and service boats at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
The Kelp Goose (Chloephaga hybrida), is a member of the duck, goose and swan family Anatidae (Spanish: Caranca or Cauquén Marino). It is in the shelduck subfamily Tadorninae. It can be found in the Southern part of South America; in Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego, and the Falkland Islands. Males are a white color, with a black beak, and yellow feet. The females are dark brown, with transverse gray lines on the chest, and yellow feet. Kelp geese generally have clutches of 2-7 eggs. They prefer to hide their eggs in long grass. The eggs hatch about a month later. There are about 15,000 breeding pairs in existence. Kelp geese are noted for only eating kelp and will migrate along the coast of South America in order to find kelp, hence the name 'kelp geese'.
979-4308 - The Kelp Goose (Chloephaga hybrida), is a member of the duck, goose and swan family Anatidae (Spanish: Caranca or Cauquén Marino). It is in the shelduck subfamily Tadorninae. It can be found in the Southern part of South America; in Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego, and the Falkland Islands. Males are a white color, with a black beak, and yellow feet. The females are dark brown, with transverse gray lines on the chest, and yellow feet. Kelp geese generally have clutches of 2-7 eggs. They prefer to hide their eggs in long grass. The eggs hatch about a month later. There are about 15,000 breeding pairs in existence. Kelp geese are noted for only eating kelp and will migrate along the coast of South America in order to find kelp, hence the name 'kelp geese'.
A family of river otters (Lontra canadensis) foraging in the Yellowstone River in Hayden Valley in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. These otters are rumaging through a muskrat den hoping to catch the owner at home. This species of otter is one of the largest, growing up to 1.5 m long (including the tail) and weighing up to 11 kg. The otter's body is streamlined and the feet are webbed so they are well adapted for swimming.
979-5142 - A family of river otters (Lontra canadensis) foraging in the Yellowstone River in Hayden Valley in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. These otters are rumaging through a muskrat den hoping to catch the owner at home. This species of otter is one of the largest, growing up to 1.5 m long (including the tail) and weighing up to 11 kg. The otter's body is streamlined and the feet are webbed so they are well adapted for swimming.
Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for dying sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6880 - Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for dying sockeye salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6907 - Mother brown bear sow (Ursus arctos) feeding near her two year-old cub at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) close-up in Southeastern Alaska, USA. MORE INFO: This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6990 - Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) close-up in Southeastern Alaska, USA. MORE INFO: This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify.  The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6871 - A young Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) fishing for pink salmon near the salmon weir at Pavlof Harbor on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. This particular bear has an unusual blonde blaze of fur across it's back making it very easy to identify. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) flukes-up dive off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. MORE INFO This animal was sighted at almost 80 degrees north latitude. At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
979-8011 - A very rare sighting of an adult blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) flukes-up dive off the northwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway. MORE INFO This animal was sighted at almost 80 degrees north latitude. At up to 32.9 metres (108 feet) in length and 172 metric tonnes (190 tons) or more in weight, it is the largest animal ever known to have existed.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4644 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4635 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.