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Two Black Bear (Ursus Americanus)Cubs In The Water, Valdez, Alaska, United States Of America
1116-42848 - Two Black Bear (Ursus Americanus)Cubs In The Water, Valdez, Alaska, United States Of America
Young Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) Eating On The Ground, Valdez, Alaska, United States Of America
1116-42849 - Young Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) Eating On The Ground, Valdez, Alaska, United States Of America
A male lion, Panthera leo, chasing a spotted hyena, Crocuta crocuta, a second hyena attacking the lion, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4960 - A male lion, Panthera leo, chasing a spotted hyena, Crocuta crocuta, a second hyena attacking the lion, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A leopard, Panthera pardus, bends down and snarls at a hyena, Crocuta crocuta eating a carcass, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4950 - A leopard, Panthera pardus, bends down and snarls at a hyena, Crocuta crocuta eating a carcass, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two male lions, Panthera leo, fighting in a clearing, snarling and picking up dust from the ground, trees and bushes in the background, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4969 - Two male lions, Panthera leo, fighting in a clearing, snarling and picking up dust from the ground, trees and bushes in the background, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A leopard's head and front paw, Panthera pardus, snarling, stick with thorns in mouth, paw holding onto stick, looking away, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5101 - A leopard's head and front paw, Panthera pardus, snarling, stick with thorns in mouth, paw holding onto stick, looking away, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two female lioness, Panthera leo, snarl at each other while standing over a carcass at night, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5146 - Two female lioness, Panthera leo, snarl at each other while standing over a carcass at night, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A lion cub, Panthera leo, lies on the back on a lioness, gripping her around the shoulders, the lioness bends down and snarls, open mouth, with a bloody face, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5137 - A lion cub, Panthera leo, lies on the back on a lioness, gripping her around the shoulders, the lioness bends down and snarls, open mouth, with a bloody face, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
A leopard, Panthera pardus, hugs a fallen over tree branch, snarls and looking away, open mouth, sunlight and greenery in background, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-5133 - A leopard, Panthera pardus, hugs a fallen over tree branch, snarls and looking away, open mouth, sunlight and greenery in background, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two wild dog, Lycaon pictus, standing on their hind legs and fighting, front legs around each other, bloody faces, mouths open showing teeth, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4991 - Two wild dog, Lycaon pictus, standing on their hind legs and fighting, front legs around each other, bloody faces, mouths open showing teeth, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two wild dogs, Lycaon pictus, stand on their hind legs in long dry grass and fight, bloody faces, showing teeth, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4949 - Two wild dogs, Lycaon pictus, stand on their hind legs in long dry grass and fight, bloody faces, showing teeth, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Two leopards, Panthera pardus, fighting, snarling and on their hind legs, in dry yellow grass, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
1174-4970 - Two leopards, Panthera pardus, fighting, snarling and on their hind legs, in dry yellow grass, Londolozi Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa
Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), during courtship, calling, animal portrait, Berchtesgadener Land, Bavaria, Germany, Europe
832-382743 - Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), during courtship, calling, animal portrait, Berchtesgadener Land, Bavaria, Germany, Europe
Two howling wolves (Canis lupus) in the snow, captive, Germany, Europe
832-381519 - Two howling wolves (Canis lupus) in the snow, captive, Germany, Europe
Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) in front of an iceberg, College Fjord, Prince William Sound, Alaska
832-381718 - Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) in front of an iceberg, College Fjord, Prince William Sound, Alaska
Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) in front of an iceberg, College Fjord, Prince William Sound, Alaska
832-381705 - Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) in front of an iceberg, College Fjord, Prince William Sound, Alaska
Harp Seal or Saddleback Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus, Phoca groenlandica), pup on pack ice, Magdalen Islands, Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Quebec, Canada, North America
832-381669 - Harp Seal or Saddleback Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus, Phoca groenlandica), pup on pack ice, Magdalen Islands, Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Quebec, Canada, North America
Black grouse, also blackgame or blackcock (Lyrurus tetrix) courting male, Hedmark, Norway, Europe
832-379384 - Black grouse, also blackgame or blackcock (Lyrurus tetrix) courting male, Hedmark, Norway, Europe
Eurasian kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) flapping wings excitedly, female, Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, Europe
832-379628 - Eurasian kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) flapping wings excitedly, female, Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, Europe
Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), stag, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
832-379548 - Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), stag, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), stag, Klampenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
832-379550 - Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), stag, Klampenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bugling in rut, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
832-379547 - Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bugling in rut, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
Black grouse, also blackgame or blackcock (Lyrurus tetrix) courting male, Hedmark, Norway, Europe
832-379385 - Black grouse, also blackgame or blackcock (Lyrurus tetrix) courting male, Hedmark, Norway, Europe
Two young eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla), fighting on the ground, with dead deer, Masuria, Poland, Europe
832-379321 - Two young eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla), fighting on the ground, with dead deer, Masuria, Poland, Europe
Lion (Panthera leo) mating, Okavango Delta, Botswana, Africa
832-379354 - Lion (Panthera leo) mating, Okavango Delta, Botswana, Africa
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), flukes-up dive in Frederick Sound, southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-3825 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), flukes-up dive in Frederick Sound, southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), flukes-up dive at sunset in Frederick Sound, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-3822 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), flukes-up dive at sunset in Frederick Sound, Southeast Alaska, United States of America, North America
An adult pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba), with captured fish in Inian Pass, Cross Sound, Alaska, United States of America, North America
1112-3805 - An adult pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba), with captured fish in Inian Pass, Cross Sound, Alaska, United States of America, North America
Red deer (Cervus elaphus), in morning fog, belling, rutting season, Denmark, Europe
832-378769 - Red deer (Cervus elaphus), in morning fog, belling, rutting season, Denmark, Europe
Red deer (Cervus elaphus), belling, Denmark, Europe
832-378774 - Red deer (Cervus elaphus), belling, Denmark, Europe
Red deer (Cervus elaphus), belling in the rain, Denmark, Europe
832-378773 - Red deer (Cervus elaphus), belling in the rain, Denmark, Europe
European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) sitting on branch of an acacia, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, Europe
832-379053 - European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) sitting on branch of an acacia, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, Europe
Red deer (Cervus elaphus), belling in the rain, Denmark, Europe
832-378772 - Red deer (Cervus elaphus), belling in the rain, Denmark, Europe
A Paradise Shelduck And Its Ducklings Move Along The Banks Of Milford Sound
857-94050 - A Paradise Shelduck And Its Ducklings Move Along The Banks Of Milford Sound
Bottle-nose Dolphins Swimming On The Surface During A Rainy Day In Milford Sound
857-94049 - Bottle-nose Dolphins Swimming On The Surface During A Rainy Day In Milford Sound
Bottle-nose Dolphins During A Rainy Day In Milford Sound, New Zealand
857-94048 - Bottle-nose Dolphins During A Rainy Day In Milford Sound, New Zealand
Southern black korhaan (Eupodotis afra) male calling, Mountain Zebra National Park, South Africa, Africa
764-5246 - Southern black korhaan (Eupodotis afra) male calling, Mountain Zebra National Park, South Africa, Africa
Brad Jackson uses a call as Corey Funk keeps his eyes open for geese as the two men hunt in the early morning in Carson City, NV, United States of America
857-90811 - Brad Jackson uses a call as Corey Funk keeps his eyes open for geese as the two men hunt in the early morning in Carson City, NV, United States of America
Brad Jackson uses a call to lure geese while hunting in Carson City, NV, United States of America
857-90818 - Brad Jackson uses a call to lure geese while hunting in Carson City, NV, United States of America
Adult kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) in flight at Brown Bluff, Antarctic Sound, Antarctica, Polar Regions
1112-2822 - Adult kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) in flight at Brown Bluff, Antarctic Sound, Antarctica, Polar Regions
Adult kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) in flight at Brown Bluff, Antarctic Sound, Antarctica, Polar Regions
1112-2821 - Adult kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) in flight at Brown Bluff, Antarctic Sound, Antarctica, Polar Regions
lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, Little Card Sound, Biscayne Bay, Key Largo, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean
983-643 - lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, Little Card Sound, Biscayne Bay, Key Largo, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) calf breaching in Yampi Sound, Kimberley, Western Australia, Australia, Pacific
1112-2442 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) calf breaching in Yampi Sound, Kimberley, Western Australia, Australia, Pacific
Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) on an iceberg, Antarctic Sound, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica
832-369318 - Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) on an iceberg, Antarctic Sound, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica
Jaguar, Panthera onca, Brazil, Brazil
1174-1691 - Jaguar, Panthera onca, Brazil, Brazil
Lion and cubs resting and relaxing in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
1174-1896 - Lion and cubs resting and relaxing in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
Southern Elephant Seal Pups, Mirounga leonina, South Georgia Island, Falkland islands, South Georgia Island, Falkland islands
1174-1700 - Southern Elephant Seal Pups, Mirounga leonina, South Georgia Island, Falkland islands, South Georgia Island, Falkland islands
African lion, Duba Plains, Botswana, Duba Plains, Botswana
1174-1500 - African lion, Duba Plains, Botswana, Duba Plains, Botswana
Subantarctic skua, Catharacta antarctica, stealing king penguin egg, Aptenodytes patagonicus, South Georgia Island
1173-1689 - Subantarctic skua, Catharacta antarctica, stealing king penguin egg, Aptenodytes patagonicus, South Georgia Island
Lion yawning, Panthera leo, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
1173-607 - Lion yawning, Panthera leo, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
Hippo threatening, Hippopotamus amphibius, Okavango Delta, Botswana
1173-338 - Hippo threatening, Hippopotamus amphibius, Okavango Delta, Botswana
Cheetah snarling, Acinonyx jubatus, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Namibia
1173-3452 - Cheetah snarling, Acinonyx jubatus, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Namibia
Bengal tiger snarling, Panthera tigris tigris, Western Ghats, India
1173-1251 - Bengal tiger snarling, Panthera tigris tigris, Western Ghats, India
Spotted hyena mother with pups, Crocuta crocuta, Okavango Delta, Botswana
1173-1886 - Spotted hyena mother with pups, Crocuta crocuta, Okavango Delta, Botswana
Lioness snarling, Panthera leo, Botswana, Botswana
1173-255 - Lioness snarling, Panthera leo, Botswana, Botswana
Red deer stag (Cervus elaphus) roaring, Arran, Scotland, United Kingdom, Europe
743-1189 - Red deer stag (Cervus elaphus) roaring, Arran, Scotland, United Kingdom, Europe
New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) hauled out in Dusky Sound, South Island, New Zealand, Pacific
1112-1302 - New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) hauled out in Dusky Sound, South Island, New Zealand, Pacific
Adult female and male long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), offshore near Doubtful Sound, South Island, New Zealand, Pacific
1112-1307 - Adult female and male long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), offshore near Doubtful Sound, South Island, New Zealand, Pacific
Male red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) displaying, Pawnee National Grassland, Colorado, United States of America, North America
764-3604 - Male red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) displaying, Pawnee National Grassland, Colorado, United States of America, North America
Male yellow-headed blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) dislaying, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, United States of America, North America
764-3602 - Male yellow-headed blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) dislaying, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, United States of America, North America
lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, in seagrass bed, Little Card Sound, Biscayne Bay, Key Largo, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean
817-384219 - lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, in seagrass bed, Little Card Sound, Biscayne Bay, Key Largo, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean
Swallow-tailed gull (Creagrus furcatus), Genovesa Island, Galapagos Islands, UNESCO World Heritge Site, Ecuador, South America
1112-15 - Swallow-tailed gull (Creagrus furcatus), Genovesa Island, Galapagos Islands, UNESCO World Heritge Site, Ecuador, South America
Tube anemones (pachycerianthus delwynae), wild, day, shore diving, sand, metropolitan, Perth city, Cockburn Sound, Western Australia, Indian Ocean. MORE INFO: attractive specie is white with purple tips on the tentacles
1022-93 - Tube anemones (pachycerianthus delwynae), wild, day, shore diving, sand, metropolitan, Perth city, Cockburn Sound, Western Australia, Indian Ocean. MORE INFO: attractive specie is white with purple tips on the tentacles
lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, Little Card Sound, Biscayne Bay, Key Largo, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean
983-43 - lemon shark, Negaprion brevirostris, Little Card Sound, Biscayne Bay, Key Largo, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4596 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7485 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6569 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4592 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6564 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4603 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4598 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Adult Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) breaching in Frederick Sound, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
979-597 - Adult Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) breaching in Frederick Sound, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean.
A view of the abandoned bowhead whaling station with bones strewn about in Hornsund (Horn Sound) on the southwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
979-8055 - A view of the abandoned bowhead whaling station with bones strewn about in Hornsund (Horn Sound) on the southwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6565 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6576 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4601 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
A view of the abandoned bowhead whaling station with bones strewn about in Hornsund (Horn Sound) on the southwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
979-8052 - A view of the abandoned bowhead whaling station with bones strewn about in Hornsund (Horn Sound) on the southwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4591 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6568 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6570 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6567 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
A small pod of Type B Orca (Orcinus nanus) traveling in ice in Crystal Sound on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. Killer Whales are found in all oceans and most seas, including (unusually for cetaceans) the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. However, they prefer cooler temperate and polar regions.Males typically range from 6-8 m long (19-26 ft) and weigh in excess of 6 tons. Females are smaller, generally ranging from 5-7 m (16-23 ft) and weighing about 3 to 4 tons. The largest Killer Whale ever recorded was a male off the coast of Japan, measuring 9.8 m (32 ft) and weighing over 8 tons (17,636 lb). Calves at birth weigh about 180 kg (350-500 lb) and are about 2.4 m long (6-8 ft). The Killer Whale's large size and strength make it among the fastest marine mammals, often reaching speeds in excess of 56 km/h (35 mph). These animals are also often called killer whales, but this is a misnomer as this is actually the largest member of the dolphin family. The Type B Orca is a proposed new species called Orcinus nanus, though this is not universally accepted in the scientific community yet. Antarctic population estimate is70,000?80,000.
979-4777 - A small pod of Type B Orca (Orcinus nanus) traveling in ice in Crystal Sound on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. Killer Whales are found in all oceans and most seas, including (unusually for cetaceans) the Mediterranean and Arabian Seas. However, they prefer cooler temperate and polar regions.Males typically range from 6-8 m long (19-26 ft) and weigh in excess of 6 tons. Females are smaller, generally ranging from 5-7 m (16-23 ft) and weighing about 3 to 4 tons. The largest Killer Whale ever recorded was a male off the coast of Japan, measuring 9.8 m (32 ft) and weighing over 8 tons (17,636 lb). Calves at birth weigh about 180 kg (350-500 lb) and are about 2.4 m long (6-8 ft). The Killer Whale's large size and strength make it among the fastest marine mammals, often reaching speeds in excess of 56 km/h (35 mph). These animals are also often called killer whales, but this is a misnomer as this is actually the largest member of the dolphin family. The Type B Orca is a proposed new species called Orcinus nanus, though this is not universally accepted in the scientific community yet. Antarctic population estimate is70,000?80,000.
Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony on sail rock in Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska. This young animal has salmon fishing gear imbedded in its mouth (probably tried to take a salmon off a long-liner.) This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-2758 - Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony on sail rock in Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska. This young animal has salmon fishing gear imbedded in its mouth (probably tried to take a salmon off a long-liner.) This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4593 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony on sail rock in Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska. This young animal has salmon fishing gear imbedded in its mouth (probably tried to take a salmon off a long-liner.) This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-2111 - Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony on sail rock in Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska. This young animal has salmon fishing gear imbedded in its mouth (probably tried to take a salmon off a long-liner.) This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4604 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
A view of the abandoned bowhead whaling station with bones strewn about in Hornsund (Horn Sound) on the southwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
979-8053 - A view of the abandoned bowhead whaling station with bones strewn about in Hornsund (Horn Sound) on the southwestern side of Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6574 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4597 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4590 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony on sail rock in Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska. This young animal has salmon fishing gear imbedded in its mouth (probably tried to take a salmon off a long-liner.) This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-2110 - Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony on sail rock in Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska. This young animal has salmon fishing gear imbedded in its mouth (probably tried to take a salmon off a long-liner.) This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6575 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Adult Grey-headed Albatross, (Thalassarche chrysostoma), also known as the Grey-headed Mollymawk, on the wing at sunrise in Crystal Sound, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. This albatross has a circumpolar distribution, nesting on isolated islands in the Southern Ocean and feeding at high latitudes, further south than any of the other mollymawks. Grey-headed Albatrosses nest in colonies on several islands in the Southern Ocean, with large colonies on South Georgia in the South Atlantic. A single egg is laid in a large nest, and incubated for 72 days. Studies in South Georgia's Bird Island have shown that the growing chick is fed 616g of food every 1.2 days, with the chick increasing in weight to around 4900 g. Chicks then tend to lose weight before fledging, which happens after 141 days. Chick will generally not return to the colony for 6-7 years after fledging, and will not breed for the first time until several years after that. If a pair of has managed to successfully raise a chick it will not breed in the following year, taking the year off. During this time spent away from the colony they can cover great distances, often circling the globe several times
979-5001 - Adult Grey-headed Albatross, (Thalassarche chrysostoma), also known as the Grey-headed Mollymawk, on the wing at sunrise in Crystal Sound, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. This albatross has a circumpolar distribution, nesting on isolated islands in the Southern Ocean and feeding at high latitudes, further south than any of the other mollymawks. Grey-headed Albatrosses nest in colonies on several islands in the Southern Ocean, with large colonies on South Georgia in the South Atlantic. A single egg is laid in a large nest, and incubated for 72 days. Studies in South Georgia's Bird Island have shown that the growing chick is fed 616g of food every 1.2 days, with the chick increasing in weight to around 4900 g. Chicks then tend to lose weight before fledging, which happens after 141 days. Chick will generally not return to the colony for 6-7 years after fledging, and will not breed for the first time until several years after that. If a pair of has managed to successfully raise a chick it will not breed in the following year, taking the year off. During this time spent away from the colony they can cover great distances, often circling the globe several times
Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6562 - Curious northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) colony in Inian Pass near Cross Sound, southeastern Alaska. These animals are excited by the incoming flood tide, as well as the Zodiacs and Lindblad guests among them. This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4600 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7483 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Adult Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7482 - Adult Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7484 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4589 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.