Robert Harding

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860-290418 - Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-289976 - Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) is a baleen whale, more specifically a rorqual belonging to the same group as blue whales and humpback whales. Mirissa, Southern Province, Sri Lanka, Bay of Bengal, Indian Ocean
860-289977 - Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) is a baleen whale, more specifically a rorqual belonging to the same group as blue whales and humpback whales. Mirissa, Southern Province, Sri Lanka, Bay of Bengal, Indian Ocean
860-289980 - Tail of Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) is the largest animal ever known to have existed. This may be the pygmy sub-species of blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus. Mirissa, Sri Lanka, Indian Ocean Photo taken under permit
860-289978 - Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) is a baleen whale, more specifically a rorqual belonging to the same group as blue whales and humpback whales. Trincomalee, Eastern Province, Sri Lanka, Bay of Bengal, Indian Ocean
860-290420 - Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-290419 - Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-290421 - Snorkeler and fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-289979 - Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) is a baleen whale, more specifically a rorqual belonging to the same group as blue whales and humpback whales. Trincomalee, Eastern Province, Sri Lanka, Bay of Bengal, Indian Ocean
860-286684 - Blue whale Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda is the largest animal ever known to have existed. This may be the pygmy sub-species of blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus. Mirissa, Sri Lanka, Indian Ocean
911-10813 - Minke Whales(Balaenoptera acutorostrata) feeding in the Gerlache Strait separating the Palmer Archipelago from the Antarctic Peninsular off Anvers Island. The Antartic Peninsular is one of the fastest warming areas of the planet.
990-166 - Late phase of an oblique lunge. The Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) falls back into the water while its throat is still expanded and water is pushed out under high pressure. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-155 - Close up of the blowholes of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) that lie just posterior of the distinctive ridge stretching over the rostrum. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-148 - Amazing closeup of a lunging Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) feeding on krill. Some of these small euphausiids are still hanging on to the expanded grooves. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-146 - She canÃt be more trusting than that. A curious Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) has turned upside down exposing her white belly, navel and genital slits to the photographer. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-167 - A perfect oblique lunge of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) surface feeding in the early evening. Its Grooves are expanded and water is purged out, two main characteristics of a feeding strike. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-139 - The Indian summer colours the tree line along the coast indicating the oncoming winter. A sign that Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) should start their migration south to unknown waters. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-161 - Steering with its pectoral fins the friendly Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) turns its streamlined body towards the boat in order to dive under the hull. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada. Sequence 5/6
990-180 - She canít be more trusting than that. A curious Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) has turned upside down exposing her white belly, navel and genital slits to the photographer. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-164 - Closeup of a the mouth tip of a lunging Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata). To extract the engulfed fish the whale purges water through a slight opening between its lips. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-177 - Closeup of the expanded grooves of a giant Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) during a lateral lunge, a feeding strike occasionally seen in the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada.
990-168 - A dense net of blood vessels colour the belly of Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) named Picasso pink during high feeding activity. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-159 - The white flipper band of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) is visible through the greenish water. This distinctive feature is characteristic of Minke whales of the northern hemisphere and the most obvious difference to their relatives in the Antarctic. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-170 - The distinctive colouration pattern of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata). Note that the typical white flipper band extends on to the lower side of the pectoral fin. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada (RR)
990-173 - Tall dorsal fin of a Finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus) which is located far back along the dorsal ridge. This prominent feature is often used for identification. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-153 - Although largely solitary animals, certain individual Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) of the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada, have started to form pairs in recent years. Reasons for this are not yet well understood.
990-162 - A friendly Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) has rolled onto its right side to take a better look at the excited people on the boat. Note that the left eye is open. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-150 - ItÃŒs all about being fast and agile when hunting small schooling capelin, the main prey of Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) in the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-147 - The purging water almost reaches the photographers camera. Closeup of an oblique lunge of a surface feeding Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata). St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-171 - Tiny water droplets catch the last light of the setting sun as this Finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus) exhales blasting the air compressed in its huge lungs high into the air. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-144 - Surfacing sequence of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) which is following the research vessel. Such friendly whales are most often curious juveniles which love to take a break from their main activity, feeding. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada Sequence 3/6.
990-156 - What is more beautiful? The harmonically formed tip of the Minke whaleÃŒs (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) snout or the water bubble along its lips? St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-140 - Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) surfacing in the green coloured water. Although exposed, she still has both blowholes tightly closed. Note the pronounced ridge on the rostrum, a main feature of rorqual whales. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada Sequence 1/2.
990-163 - She canÃŒt be more trusting than that. A curious Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) has turned upside down exposing her white belly, navel and genital slits to the photographer. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-152 - Two Minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) surfacing as a pair. Whales migrating to the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada, have to share their summer feeding ground with numerous freighters along the international seaway which connects Quebec City with the Atlantic ocean.
990-172 - Finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus) arching its back in order to dive showing its tall dorsal fin and patches of green algae that cover its back. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-169 - Like a piece of art thousands of waterdrops cover the expanded belly of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) performing a ventral arc. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-174 - The white tip of a Finback whaleÌs (Balaenoptera physalus) snout showing a distinctive characteristic of this species; the lower right jaw is white in colour whereas the left side is dark. Gasp», Canada
990-154 - Unusual scratches and impermanent patches on the skin of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) known as Otter who was first identified in the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada, in 1996.
990-157 - The pointy snout of a surfacing Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) keeping its blowholes tightly closed until the moment they break the surface. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-158 - Even in conditions with little visibility, the white flipper band of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) shines through the water of the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-151 - The result of a strong head slap of a Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata). Such a splash supposedly scares shoaling fish that are known to cluster when threatened. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada
990-175 - Finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus) might be seen alone or in pairs but often form groups of more than a dozen animals in order to hunt fish. St. Lawrence estuary, Canada (RR)