Robert Harding

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911-10939 - In mid January 2015, a three day period of excessive rain brought unprecedented floods to the small poor African country of Malawi. It displaced nearly quarter of a million people, devastated 64,000 hectares of land, and killed several hundred people. This shot shows A Medicin Sans Frontieres clinic in Makhanga testing local people for malaria, many of whom proved positive for the disease, as a result of the drying up flood waters providing ideal breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
832-320178 - Busty paper-mache woman with collagen and botox needles sticking in her lips and face, Carnival (Mardi Gras) parade in Duesseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, Europe
832-81013 - Mythological figure on the edge of the pond of the Fama Fountain, by Rudolf Maison 1884-85, in front of the Schloss Herrenchiemsee Palace, Herrenchiemsee, Bavaria, Germany, Europe
1116-11271 - Thanksgiving plaques on a shrine at the Difunta Correa Sanctuary, Vallecito, San Juan, Argentina. La Difunta Correa is the most popular of Argentina's folk saints. She was a woman whose husband was forcibly recruited around the year 1840, during the Argentine civil wars. Becoming sick, he was then abandoned by partisans. In an attempt to reach her sick husband, Deolinda took her baby and followed the tracks of the partisans through the desert of San Juan Province. When her supplies ran out, she died. Her body was found days later by gauchos, however they found the baby still alive, feeding from the deceased woman's miraculously ever-full breast. Once the folk tale became known, her devout followers believe her to perform miracles and intercede for the living. Cattle keepers and truck drivers create small altars throughout Argentina and leave bottles of water as votive offerings.
1116-11272 - Thanksgiving plaques on a shrine at the Difunta Correa Sanctuary, Vallecito, San Juan, Argentina. La Difunta Correa is the most popular of Argentina's folk saints. She was a woman whose husband was forcibly recruited around the year 1840, during the Argentine civil wars. Becoming sick, he was then abandoned by partisans. In an attempt to reach her sick husband, Deolinda took her baby and followed the tracks of the partisans through the desert of San Juan Province. When her supplies ran out, she died. Her body was found days later by gauchos, however they found the baby still alive, feeding from the deceased woman's miraculously ever-full breast. Once the folk tale became known, her devout followers believe her to perform miracles and intercede for the living. Cattle keepers and truck drivers create small altars throughout Argentina and leave bottles of water as votive offerings.
857-30896 - Kazuko Uezu, age 65, makes tofu before dawn in her small shop in the village of Hedo. Despite 50 years of practice "every batch tastes slightly different" says Kazuko who rises at 4-am seven days a week to make tofu. Traditional methods and a small production produces subtle variations in every batch despite the fact that tofu has only two ingredients, salt water and soy beans. Kazuko get the salt water from the East China Sea (just down the road from her house) but the soybeans come from America. Okinawan centenarians eat tofu daily and it is believed the high flavanoid content in tofu contributes to their longevity. Flavanoids are known to fight breast and prostate cancer and believed to combat heart disease.
857-30893 - Kazuko Uezu, age 65, makes tofu before dawn in her small shop in the village of Hedo. Despite 50 years of practice "every batch tastes slightly different" says Kazuko who rises at 4-am seven days a week to make tofu. Traditional methods and a small production produces subtle variations in every batch despite the fact that tofu has only two ingredients, salt water and soy beans. Kazuko get the salt water from the East China Sea (just down the road from her house) but the soybeans come from America. Okinawan centenarians eat tofu daily and it is believed the high flavanoid content in tofu contributes to their longevity. Flavanoids are known to fight breast and prostate cancer and believed to combat heart disease.
857-30895 - Kazuko Uezu, age 65, makes tofu before dawn in her small shop in the village of Hedo. Despite 50 years of practice "every batch tastes slightly different" says Kazuko who rises at 4-am seven days a week to make tofu. Traditional methods and a small production produces subtle variations in every batch despite the fact that tofu has only two ingredients, salt water and soy beans. Kazuko get the salt water from the East China Sea (just down the road from her house) but the soybeans come from America. Okinawan centenarians eat tofu daily and it is believed the high flavanoid content in tofu contributes to their longevity. Flavanoids are known to fight breast and prostate cancer and believed to combat heart disease.
817-351665 - Local group of nacked Papua women joing the Baliem Valley festival and sitting in the grass in traditional appearance with sharp focus on one woman only, Jayawijaya region, Papua, Indonesia, Southeast Asia
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