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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle? On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st K?k?tai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.
860-287440 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle? On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st K?k?tai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.
Slender sunfish, Ranzania laevis. It's a marine, oceanic species occurs in subtropical waters between depths of 1 and 140 m. Azores, Portugal - Composite image
860-287416 - Slender sunfish, Ranzania laevis. It's a marine, oceanic species occurs in subtropical waters between depths of 1 and 140 m. Azores, Portugal - Composite image
Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite image
860-287238 - Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite image
Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6?8 m (20?26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection England
860-287264 - Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6?8 m (20?26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection England
Crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image
860-287079 - Crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image
Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Omithorhynchus anatinus, at the surface of a brook half emersed. Split view at surface. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia. Composite image
860-287054 - Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Omithorhynchus anatinus, at the surface of a brook half emersed. Split view at surface. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia. Composite image
Weedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. Australia
860-287053 - Weedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. Australia
Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) at sunset, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, Europe, digital composing
832-368077 - Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) at sunset, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, Europe, digital composing
Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) at sunset, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, Europe, digital composing
832-368075 - Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) at sunset, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, Europe, digital composing
Ferrari 212 Europa Pinin Farina Berlinetta, built 1953
832-311123 - Ferrari 212 Europa Pinin Farina Berlinetta, built 1953
Arrival and departure board at airport, flying ban because of volcanic eruption, canceled flights
832-138670 - Arrival and departure board at airport, flying ban because of volcanic eruption, canceled flights
Arrival and departure board at airport, flying ban because of volcanic eruption, canceled flights
832-138671 - Arrival and departure board at airport, flying ban because of volcanic eruption, canceled flights
Brandenburger Tor, Brandenburg Gate, Pariser Platz square, New Year's Eve fireworks display, Berlin, Germany, Europe, digital composition
832-73398 - Brandenburger Tor, Brandenburg Gate, Pariser Platz square, New Year's Eve fireworks display, Berlin, Germany, Europe, digital composition
Chapel at Hegratsrieder See, lake, with moon, digital composing, near Fuessen, Allgaeu, Bavaria, Germany, Europe
832-47695 - Chapel at Hegratsrieder See, lake, with moon, digital composing, near Fuessen, Allgaeu, Bavaria, Germany, Europe
White stork, storch, ciconia ciconia, with baby in its beak, bringing offspring, baby child, digital composition
1190-368 - White stork, storch, ciconia ciconia, with baby in its beak, bringing offspring, baby child, digital composition
Swiss alps, mountains, wannenhorn, wannenhoerner, aletschhorn, 4195 m, aletsch glacier, switzerland, wallis, view from the bettmerhorn, full moon, dusk, digital composition
1190-321 - Swiss alps, mountains, wannenhorn, wannenhoerner, aletschhorn, 4195 m, aletsch glacier, switzerland, wallis, view from the bettmerhorn, full moon, dusk, digital composition
Swiss alps, mountains, wannenhorn, wannenhoerner, aletsch glacier, switzerland, wallis, full moon, view from the bettmerhorn, full moon, dusk, digital composition
1190-323 - Swiss alps, mountains, wannenhorn, wannenhoerner, aletsch glacier, switzerland, wallis, full moon, view from the bettmerhorn, full moon, dusk, digital composition
Elephant half joined. Digital composition. . Hampstead Heath, London, UK
998-398 - Elephant half joined. Digital composition. . Hampstead Heath, London, UK
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