Robert Harding

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1348-5370 - Ebola virus particles (blue) found both as extracellular particles and budding particles from chronically infected African green monkey kidney cells. Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility in Ft. Detrick, Maryland.
860-290418 - Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-290422 - Snorkeler with Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta), one of the three species found in Mediterranean Sea. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-290420 - Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-290419 - Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-290421 - Snorkeler and fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) is the largest baleen whale found in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the world?s second largest cetacean, after the blue whale. Pelagos Sanctuary for Mediterranean Marine Mammals, Mediterranean Sea
860-289047 - Ipnops. the elusive Grideye fish, Ipnops species, found during a blackwater dive. Photographed at 50 feet while drifting in around 600 feet of water. Palm Beach, FLorida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean
860-288878 - Black water and Jellyfish (Mastigias papua) of Lenmakana lake. This lake is isolated from the rest of the ocean by ramparts several tens of meters high. It is connected to the ocean by terrestrial channels but it prevents the entry and exit of living organisms. These jellyfish have therefore found refuge in what is for them a haven of peace. They have proliferated to reach millions of people. Misool, Rajat Ampat, Indonesia
860-288880 - Flying Jellyfish (Mastigias papua) of Lenmakana lake. This lake is isolated from the rest of the ocean by ramparts several tens of meters high. It is connected to the ocean by terrestrial channels but it prevents the entry and exit of living organisms. These jellyfish have therefore found refuge in what is for them a haven of peace. They have proliferated to reach millions of people. Misool, Rajat Ampat, Indonesia
860-288879 - Jellyfish (Mastigias papua) of Lenmakana lake. This lake is isolated from the rest of the ocean by ramparts several tens of meters high. It is connected to the ocean by terrestrial channels but it prevents the entry and exit of living organisms. These jellyfish have therefore found refuge in what is for them a haven of peace. They have proliferated to reach millions of people. Misool, Rajat Ampat, Indonesia
1348-122 - Magnification : x 10 000 for 14 x 9,5 cm. This highly enlarged scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted a closer look at the details exhibited by of number of red blood cells found enmeshed in a fibrinous matrix on the luminal surface of an indwelli
1116-49664 - Although rarely seen in the ocean by divers, the Sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) is likely the most numerous of all shark species found in Hawaii. This individual was photographed at the Maui Ocean Center Aquarium, Maui, Hawii, United States of America
1116-49666 - The Malabar grouper (Epinephelus malabaricus) is one of the largest and most common cod found on coastal reefs. It can weight over 300 lbs and reach 4 feet in length, Fiji
1116-47088 - A Red Live Finger Starfish, Also Known As Linckia Sea Star, Found Along A Sandy Beach With White Ocean Tide Washing Up, Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii, United States Of America
1116-46831 - Much of the North side of the island of Molokai in inaccessible. Trade winds blow onshore regularly bringing with them piles of plastic that has been floating around the Pacific Ocean for years and years, Molokai, Hawaii, United States of America
860-287910 - Pod of Sleeping sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Researchers first saw this unusual sleep behavior in sperm whales in 2008. The scientists in that study found that sperm whales dozed in this upright drifting posture for about 10 to 15 minutes at a time, Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.
860-287909 - Pod of sperm whale relaxing after a short sleep (Physeter macrocephalus) Researchers first saw this unusual sleep behavior in sperm whales in 2008. The scientists in that study found that sperm whales dozed in this upright drifting posture for about 10 to 15 minutes at a time, Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.
860-287914 - Free diver is swimming over a pod of Sleeping sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Researchers first saw this unusual sleep behavior in sperm whales in 2008. The scientists in that study found that sperm whales dozed in this upright drifting posture for about 10 to 15 minutes at a time, Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.
860-287906 - Pod of Sleeping sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Researchers first saw this unusual sleep behavior in sperm whales in 2008. The scientists in that study found that sperm whales dozed in this upright drifting posture for about 10 to 15 minutes at a time, Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.
860-287912 - Snorkeler photographing a pod of Sleeping sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Researchers first saw this unusual sleep behavior in sperm whales in 2008. The scientists in that study found that sperm whales dozed in this upright drifting posture for about 10 to 15 minutes at a time, Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.
860-287442 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Zero wreck: Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! D: 15 m The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle? On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st K?k?tai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.
860-287440 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle? On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st K?k?tai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.
860-287077 - Yacare caiman (Caiman yacare), called jacare in Portuguese is a species of caiman found in central South America, Paraguay river, Pantanal wetlands, Mato Grosso, Brazil
1116-39726 - The Bubble Coral Shrimp (Vir philippinensis) is found only on this species of coral, Pleurogyra sinuosa. The brown oval objects are actually Acoel Flatworms (Waminoa sp) that feed on nutrients trapped in mucus covering the coral, Philippines
1116-39723 - Yellow pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus bargibanti), also known as Bargibant's Pygmy Seahorse, camouflaged in coral. They are found from Southern tropical Japan, throughout the Philippines, Indonesia, east to Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Van
1116-39716 - The Hairy Squat Lobster (Lauria slagiani) is found alone, and in pairs, on the outside of barrel sponges belonging to the genus Xestospongia. They are tiny (one centimeter across) and difficult to find on the folds of the sponge, Philippines
1116-39721 - Yellow pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus bargibanti), also known as Bargibant's Pygmy Seahorse. They are found from Southern tropical Japan, throughout the Philippines, Indonesia, east to Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Great Bar
1116-39696 - Gray langurs or Hanuman langurs (Semnopithecus entellus) are the most widespread langurs of the Indian Subcontinent. They are found throughout most of India and Sri Lanka, where this image was taken, and are also established in parts of Pakistan, Nepal, B
1116-39706 - This Short Armed Sand Octopus (Amphioctopus arenicola) has selected a beer bottle to live in. They are normally found in a small hole on a sandy bottom, not far from a reef and is endemic, Maui, Hawaii, United States of America
1116-39959 - This red encrusting sponge (Clathria sp.) is the most common of this family found in Hawaii. Here it has covered the calcium carbonate-producing seaweed, Halimeda kanaloana, Hawaii, United States of America
857-92683 - A female skier in is standing in a beautiful mountain landscape with snow covered trees near the ski resort of Rusutsu on Hokaido, Japan. Hokkaido, the north island of Japan, is geographically ideally located in the path of consistent weather systems that bring the cold air across the Sea of Japan from Siberia. This results in many of the resorts being absolutely dumped with powder that is renowned for being incredibly dry. Some of the Hokkaido ski resorts receive an amazing average of 14-18 metres of snowfall annually! With an average annual snowfall of over 14 metres, the Rusutsu Resort has some of the most incredible powder and tree skiing to be found anywhere in the world. Frequently the powder is incredibly dry; you blast right through it with virtually no resistance. Next by Kiroro was mentioned as one of the 20 must visit destination in Best of the World 2016 of National Geographic Traveler.
465-3392 - Longnose hawkfish (Oxycirrhites typus) on gorgonian sea fans (Subergorgia mollis) a hard coral species found in high current areas, Matangi Island, Vanua Levu, Fiji, Pacific
1113-95987 - The Hot Springs opposite the Volcano are colored by volcanic minerals. They are also a location where the locals come to boil eggs from the Megapode bird, found on the slopes of the volcano. Tavurvur Volcano, Rabaul, East New Britain, Papua New Guinea, Pacific
1113-95988 - The Hot Springs opposite the Volcano are colored by volcanic minerals. They are also a location where the locals come to boil eggs from the Megapode bird, found on the slopes of the volcano. Tavurvur Volcano, Rabaul, East New Britain, Papua New Guinea, Pacific