Robert Harding

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857-96033 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.
857-96034 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.
857-96032 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.
857-96031 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.
832-379619 - Volunteers at dawn at the Laguna de Fuente de Piedra, waiting for the start of the immature Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) capture event in order to ring them, Malaga province, Andalusia, Spain, Europe
857-94727 - Mforo, Tanzania a village near Moshi, Tanzania. Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray and her eldest daughter Zainabu Ramadhani, 19 cook lunch in her kitchen house using both a clean cookstove using wood and one using coal. One of her younger daughters, Nasma Ramadhani, age 5 helps out. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94726 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94728 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94729 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
832-378459 - Fire extinction, firefighting aircraft Dash 8 Q400 MR, French Sécurité Civile, dropping extinguishing agent, large-scale forest fire in Castellar, Maritime Alps, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France, Europe
832-378462 - Fire extinction with firefighting aircraft Dash 8 Q400 MR, French Sécurité Civile, large-scale forest fire in Castellar, Maritime Alps, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France, Europe
832-378457 - Firefighting aircraft Canadair CL 415, French Sécurité Civile, filling with seawater to extinguish forest fires, Mediterranean Sea, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France, Europe
857-88779 - Mountain ranger Brian Scheele on this way to Windy Corner on Mount McKinley, also know as Denali, in Alaska. He is pulling a sled, that together with his heavy backpack is containing all the gear like tents, clothing and food. Every climbing season High Mountain Rangers of the Denali National Park Service are called to help climbers in need. If possible the patient is brought down to Basecamp on foot, only in life threatening conditions a helicopter is called to evacuate the patient to a hospital in Anchorage. Mount McKinley, native name Denali, is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,321 feet (6,194 m) above sea level. At some 18,000 feet (5,500 m), the base-to-peak rise is considered the largest of any mountain situated entirely above sea level. Measured by topographic prominence, it is the third most prominent peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, McKinley is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve.
857-88775 - High Mountain Rangers Tom Ditola and David Weber are taking a rest on the West Rib on Mount McKinley, Alaska. Mount Hunter in the background. They are above the clouds in blue sky and the sun is shining. Mount McKinley, native name Denali, is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,321 feet (6,194 m) above sea level. At some 18,000 feet (5,500 m), the base-to-peak rise is considered the largest of any mountain situated entirely above sea level. Measured by topographic prominence, it is the third most prominent peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, McKinley is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve. Every climbing season High Mountain Rangers of the Denali National Park Service are called to help climbers in need. If possible the patient is brought down to base camp on foot, only in life threatening conditions a helicopter is called to evacuate the patient to a hospital in Anchorage.
857-88773 - A mountain ranger is digging out tents after a snowstorm covered them during the night in 14k camp on Mount McKinley, Alaska. Climbers are advised to spare no expense on a expedition-quality tent as it can mean the difference between life and death during a ferocious storm on Denali. Extra poles and repair materials are important in case of damage caused by storms. Plan to take extra pickets, wands or deadmen for tent anchors. Never leave a tent without anchoring it securely. Tents are lost each year due to sudden gusts of wind while the tent was left unattended or drying. Every climbing season High Mountain Rangers of the Denali National Park Service are called to help climbers in need. If possible the patient is brought down to base camp on foot, only in life threatening conditions a helicopter is called to evacuate the patient to a hospital in Anchorage.
857-88636 - Two climbers dig out their tent after a snowstorm covered them in 14k camp on Mount McKinley, Alaska. Climbers are advised to spare no expense on a expedition-quality tent as it can mean the difference between life and death during a ferocious storm on Denali. Extra poles and repair materials are important in case of damage caused by storms. Plan to take extra pickets, wands or deadmen for tent anchors. Never leave a tent without anchoring it securely. Tents are lost each year due to sudden gusts of wind while the tent was left unattended or drying. Every climbing season High Mountain Rangers of the Denali National Park Service are called to help climbers in need. If possible the patient is brought down to base camp on foot, only in life threatening conditions a helicopter is called to evacuate the patient to a hospital in Anchorage.
911-10356 - A water charity in Porterville supplying bottled water to houses who have had no running water for over five months, near Bakersfield, California, USA. Hoses in the East of Porterville, many of which are on private wells, have run completely out of water as the water table has dropped catastrophically. Following an unprecedented four year long drought, Bakersfield is now the driest city in the USA. Most of California is in exceptional drought, the highest level of drought classification. 428,000 acres of agricultural land have been taken out of production due to lack of water, thousands of agricultural workers have lost their jobs and one third of all children in California go to bed hungry.
911-10076 - A motorist stuck in flood waters on the road at Storth on the Kent Estuary in Cumbria, UK, during the January 2014 storm surge and high tides, is pushed out by two helpers.
797-12076 - Germany, Berlin, The East Side Gallery, a 1.3 km long section of the Berlin Wall, Mural called 'My God help me survive this deadly love' Soviet Premier Brezhnev kisses East German Chancellor Honecker.
797-12077 - Germany, Berlin, The East Side Gallery, a 1.3 km long section of the Berlin Wall, Mural called My God help me survive this deadly love, Soviet Premier Brezhnev kisses East German Chancellor Honecker.
832-368947 - Man lifting pan with cement onto a scaffold, construction of brick houses for families whose houses were destroyed during the flood catastrophe of 2010, Lashari Wala village near Muzaffaragarh, Punjab, Pakistan, Asia
832-370856 - Bar Mitzvah celebration at the Western or Wailing Wall in the direction of the Jewish Quarter, boy is carrying the Torah scroll with the help of his father, Muslim Quarter, Old City, Jerusalem, Israel, Middle East