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Girl Drawing Heart In The Sand
1116-40598 - Girl Drawing Heart In The Sand
A Girl Draws A Happy Face In The Sand
1116-41277 - A Girl Draws A Happy Face In The Sand
Young female in forest
1178-12056 - Young female in forest
Young female in forest
1178-6351 - Young female in forest
Young female sketching
1178-6350 - Young female sketching
King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) breeding and nesting colonies on South Georgia Island, Southern Ocean. King penguins are rarely found below 60 degrees south, and almost never on the Antarctic Peninsula. The King Penguin is the second largest species of penguin at about 90 cm (3 ft) tall and weighing 11 to 16 kg (24 to 35 lb), second only to the Emperor Penguin. King penguins eat small fish, mainly lanternfish, and squid and rely less than most Southern Ocean predators on krill and other crustaceans. On foraging trips they repeatedly dive to over 100 meters (350 feet), often over 200 meters (700 feet). This is far deeper than other penguins, other than their closest relative, the larger Emperor penguin. King Penguins breed on the subantarctic islands at the northern reaches of Antarctica, as well as Tierra del Fuego, South Georgia, and other temperate islands of the region. The total population is estimated to be 2.23 million pairs and is increasing. The King Penguin was described in 1778 by English naturalist and illustrator John Frederick Miller, its generic name derived from the Ancient Greek a 'without' pteno- 'able to fly' or 'winged' and dytes/ 'diver'.Its specific epithet patagonicus derived from Patagonia.
979-3829 - King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) breeding and nesting colonies on South Georgia Island, Southern Ocean. King penguins are rarely found below 60 degrees south, and almost never on the Antarctic Peninsula. The King Penguin is the second largest species of penguin at about 90 cm (3 ft) tall and weighing 11 to 16 kg (24 to 35 lb), second only to the Emperor Penguin. King penguins eat small fish, mainly lanternfish, and squid and rely less than most Southern Ocean predators on krill and other crustaceans. On foraging trips they repeatedly dive to over 100 meters (350 feet), often over 200 meters (700 feet). This is far deeper than other penguins, other than their closest relative, the larger Emperor penguin. King Penguins breed on the subantarctic islands at the northern reaches of Antarctica, as well as Tierra del Fuego, South Georgia, and other temperate islands of the region. The total population is estimated to be 2.23 million pairs and is increasing. The King Penguin was described in 1778 by English naturalist and illustrator John Frederick Miller, its generic name derived from the Ancient Greek a 'without' pteno- 'able to fly' or 'winged' and dytes/ 'diver'.Its specific epithet patagonicus derived from Patagonia.
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