Robert Harding

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832-389077 - Bang-bang carriers in a market at the port of Chongqing, the carriers are like a caste of their own, carrying loads for the traders for little money, mostly immigrant workers from rural areas, Chongqing, China, Asia
832-389072 - Bang-bang carriers in a market at the port of Chongqing, the carriers are like a caste of their own, carrying loads for the traders for little money, mostly immigrant workers from rural areas, Chongqing, China, Asia
832-389074 - Bang-bang carriers in a market at the port of Chongqing, the carriers are like a caste of their own, carrying loads for the traders for little money, mostly immigrant workers from rural areas, Chongqing, China, Asia
832-389075 - Bang-bang carriers in a market at the port of Chongqing, the carriers are like a caste of their own, carrying loads for the traders for little money, mostly immigrant workers from rural areas, Chongqing, China, Asia
1116-46913 - A backpacker observes the midnight sun peeking through the clouds from an unnamed fork of the Atigun River still partially covered in aufeis (sheet-like ice formations) in a remote valley of the Brooks Range, Alaska, United States of America
860-287450 - Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time ? a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos
1116-41508 - A look at the bump-like knobs known as tubercles on the top of the head of a Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae). Each protuberance contains at least one stiff hair. The purpose of these hairs is not known, though they may provide the whale with a sense of 'touch', Hawaii, United States of America
857-95133 - Al-Rifa'i Mosque Entrance in the historic part of Cairo, The building itself is a melange of styles taken primarily from the Mamluk period of Egyptian history, including its dome and minaret. The building contains a large prayer hall as well as the shrines of al-Rifa'i and two other local saints, Ali Abi-Shubbak and Yahya al-Ansari. Members of the Royal family of Egypt are baried in the mosque, like Kind Farouk the first
857-94727 - Mforo, Tanzania a village near Moshi, Tanzania. Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray and her eldest daughter Zainabu Ramadhani, 19 cook lunch in her kitchen house using both a clean cookstove using wood and one using coal. One of her younger daughters, Nasma Ramadhani, age 5 helps out. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94726 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94843 - The original lighthouse at Cape Spear in Newfoundland sits dark, with the new lighthouse nearby. The original lighthouse started operation in 1836, and in 1955 a new concrete light tower was built. The original lighthouse has been restored to the period of 1839. This was tricky to shoot because the green light of the active lighthouse would flash every 7 seconds and wash out the scene in intense green. I didn't like the harsh shadows from the light, myself and my tripod being one of them, so I took a bunch of 6 second exposures and used stacking to get pinpoint stars and low noise in the sky and foreground. Nikon D5, Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 lens @ 14mm and f/2.8. Six shots with the ISO between 12,800 and 25,600, as I was playing around with the camera to get a feel for its performance, stacked in Starry Landscape Stacker for Mac.
857-94728 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94725 - Ester Hodari, age 22 years old, cooks dinner using the traditional three-rock cook stove with a fire in the middle. These cookstoves use a lot of fuel, firewood, and produce a lot of smoke. Ester told us that cooking with this type of stove made her eyes turn red and she often had a chest cough. Her children, ages 5, 2 and 3 months are often with her when she is cooking. Her sister-in-law, Shadya Jumanne, age 11, helps her cook as well. Not long ago Ester’s 3 month-old developed a cough, It kept getting worse and so they took her by motorcycle to the hospital at night. Ester started really worrying about this. After this Ester and her husband agreed that they needed to buy a clean cookstove and started saving. The girl helping Ester cook in some of the images is her sister-in-law Shadya Jumanne, age 11. Ester met Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray when she married her husband and moved to this village, Mforo near Moshi, Tanzania. Ester said that Fatma is like a mother to her in the village. When Fatma showed Ester the new wood stove she saw that is used less wood and produced less smoke.
857-94729 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
1242-78 - At this burial cliff, condolence signs from past funerals and coffin carriers shaped like traditional Torajan houses are left below the crypts and tao-taos, Tana Toraja, Sulawesi, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Asia
746-88414 - Fasil Ghebbi, fortress like royal enclosure, Gonder, Ethiopia. View from Fasiladas palace, in the middle the library of Johannes I. The library was renovated during the italian occupation, Africa, East Africa, Ethiopia, Gonder, September 2010
857-91093 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Sable Fish or "Black Cod" off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91102 - Sept 26, 2008 Fishing offshore, Big Sur California on the MV Nikki J using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method of sustainable fishing. Crew: David Anderson & Brian Long Fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish and Sable Fish or "Black Cod". A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91094 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Sable Fish or "Black Cod" off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91098 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91090 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Sable Fish or "Black Cod" off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91095 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Sable Fish or "Black Cod" off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91092 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91101 - Sept 25, 2008 On docks of Morro Bay California fisherman Dave Rose at his processing wharf unloading his catch of Black Gill Rock Fish, caught on sustainable long-lines. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91097 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91096 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Sable Fish or "Black Cod" off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91105 - Sept 26, 2008 Fishing offshore, Big Sur California on the MV Nikki J using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method of sustainable fishing. Crew member David Anderson hauls in a Sable Fish or "Black Cod". A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91103 - Sept 26, 2008 Fishing offshore, Big Sur California on the MV Nikki J using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method of sustainable fishing. Captain Dave Rose (L) and his crew David Anderson reel in a Sable Fish or "Black Cod". A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91100 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91099 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-91091 - Sept 24, 2008 20 miles offshore of Morro Bay California. Captain Bill Blue fishing for Black Gill Rock Fish off the coast of Big Sur California using the "hook and line", or "long-line" method. A new wave in sustainable commercial fishing is pushing fisherman to switch from higher impact methods of harvesting fish like trawling- to hook and line or long line harvest, United States of America
857-88779 - Mountain ranger Brian Scheele on this way to Windy Corner on Mount McKinley, also know as Denali, in Alaska. He is pulling a sled, that together with his heavy backpack is containing all the gear like tents, clothing and food. Every climbing season High Mountain Rangers of the Denali National Park Service are called to help climbers in need. If possible the patient is brought down to Basecamp on foot, only in life threatening conditions a helicopter is called to evacuate the patient to a hospital in Anchorage. Mount McKinley, native name Denali, is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,321 feet (6,194 m) above sea level. At some 18,000 feet (5,500 m), the base-to-peak rise is considered the largest of any mountain situated entirely above sea level. Measured by topographic prominence, it is the third most prominent peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, McKinley is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve.
857-88786 - A female hiker on her way to the Wannihorn, a mountain peak in the Swiss Alps, close to Zermatt. In the background is the Weisshorn range. This region of Wallis is home to over 40 of 4000 meter peaks and a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts like climbers, hikers, mountainbikers, trailrunners and nature lovers.
857-88781 - A male mountaineer is standing on the summit of the Barrhorn, a mountain peak of 3610 meter in the Swiss Alps. It is one of the highest summits in Europe to be accessible to experienced hikers. The region of Wallis is home to over 40 mountain peaks higher than 4000 meter. The highest one that is completely situated within the Swiss borders is the Dom, which is visible in the background. The Mattertal runs from Visp all the way to Zermatt and is a paradise for all outdoor enthusiasts, like hikers, climbers, alpinists, walkers, mountain bikers and nature lovers.
857-88780 - A female hiker crossing a river in the Swiss Alps. In the background is the Ried glacier. This region of Wallis, close to Zermatt, is a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts like climbers, alpinists, hikers, mountainbikers and nature lovers. The water is directly coming from the glacier, so very refreshing after an excercise.
857-88784 - A female hiker relaxing near a river in the Swiss Alps. The region of Wallis, close to Zermatt. In the background is the Ried glacier. This valley is a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts like climbers, alpinists, hikers, mountainbikers and nature lovers. The water is directly coming from the glacier, so very refreshing after an excercise.
911-10780 - Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) off a beach in northern Svalbard, once hunted to near extinction they are now recovering, only to be affected by climate change which reduces the sea ice they like to haul out on.
911-10779 - Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) off a beach in northern Svalbard, once hunted to near extinction they are now recovering, only to be affected by climate change which reduces the sea ice they like to haul out on.