Robert Harding

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1350-2073 - New Ireland Malagan funerary statue in at the Metropolitan Museum of Art museum, New York, USA. New Ireland is part of the Bismarck Archipelago, situated north of New Guinea, and has an estimated population of 100,000. The Dutch first encountered the island in 1616, and today New Ireland is a province of Papua New Guinea. Nineteen different languages are spoken on the island, and it is divided by a chain of mountains into three distinct regions: northern, central, and southeastern. The art of New Ireland traditionally centered on mortuary ceremonies and feasts to honor the dead. In northern New Ireland, the name given to these elaborate ceremonies is malagan, which is also the term used for the carved and painted sculptures associated with the ceremonies.
860-288878 - Black water and Jellyfish (Mastigias papua) of Lenmakana lake. This lake is isolated from the rest of the ocean by ramparts several tens of meters high. It is connected to the ocean by terrestrial channels but it prevents the entry and exit of living organisms. These jellyfish have therefore found refuge in what is for them a haven of peace. They have proliferated to reach millions of people. Misool, Rajat Ampat, Indonesia
860-288880 - Flying Jellyfish (Mastigias papua) of Lenmakana lake. This lake is isolated from the rest of the ocean by ramparts several tens of meters high. It is connected to the ocean by terrestrial channels but it prevents the entry and exit of living organisms. These jellyfish have therefore found refuge in what is for them a haven of peace. They have proliferated to reach millions of people. Misool, Rajat Ampat, Indonesia
860-288879 - Jellyfish (Mastigias papua) of Lenmakana lake. This lake is isolated from the rest of the ocean by ramparts several tens of meters high. It is connected to the ocean by terrestrial channels but it prevents the entry and exit of living organisms. These jellyfish have therefore found refuge in what is for them a haven of peace. They have proliferated to reach millions of people. Misool, Rajat Ampat, Indonesia
860-287442 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Zero wreck: Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! D: 15 m The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle? On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st K?k?tai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.
860-287440 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle? On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st K?k?tai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.
860-287439 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Tara in Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, H: 103,6 m, mandatory credit line: Photo: Christoph Gerigk, drone pilot: Guillaume Bourdin - Tara Expeditions Foundation
860-287437 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Small coral island and adjacent reef, near Yanaba Island, Papua New Guinea, H: 536,6 m, mandatory credit line: Photo: Christoph Gerigk, drone pilot: Guillaume Bourdin - Tara Expeditions Foundation
860-287438 - Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Small coral island and adjacent reef, near Yanaba Island, Papua New Guinea, H: 452.3 m, mandatory credit line: Photo: Christoph Gerigk, drone pilot: Guillaume Bourdin - Tara Expeditions Foundation
1116-39729 - Both a Crinoid Commensal Shrimp (Periclimenes cornutus) and a Crinoid Squat Lobster (Allogalathea elegans) on a crinoid. These tiny crustaceans are commensal on crinoids or feather stars and take their color from the host, Philippines