Exclusive only  
Color search  
Orientation
Release
License
People
Age Group
Ethnicity
Image size
more filters

Recent searches

Loading...
Portrait of a water seller at the Jemaa el-Fnaa square in  Marrakesh, Morocco, Africa
832-381149 - Portrait of a water seller at the Jemaa el-Fnaa square in Marrakesh, Morocco, Africa
Djemaa el Fnaa square at dusk, Marrakech, Morocco, Africa
832-381836 - Djemaa el Fnaa square at dusk, Marrakech, Morocco, Africa
Ko Poda is an island off the west coast of Thailand, in Krabi Province, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) from Ao Nang. It is part of the Mu Ko Poda, or Poda Group Islands, which are under the administration of Hat Nopharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park. The group consists of Ko Poda, Ko Kai, Ko Mo and Ko Thap.
857-92934 - Ko Poda is an island off the west coast of Thailand, in Krabi Province, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) from Ao Nang. It is part of the Mu Ko Poda, or Poda Group Islands, which are under the administration of Hat Nopharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park. The group consists of Ko Poda, Ko Kai, Ko Mo and Ko Thap.
Ko Poda is an island off the west coast of Thailand, in Krabi Province, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) from Ao Nang. It is part of the Mu Ko Poda, or Poda Group Islands, which are under the administration of Hat Nopharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park. The group consists of Ko Poda, Ko Kai, Ko Mo and Ko Thap.
857-92936 - Ko Poda is an island off the west coast of Thailand, in Krabi Province, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) from Ao Nang. It is part of the Mu Ko Poda, or Poda Group Islands, which are under the administration of Hat Nopharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park. The group consists of Ko Poda, Ko Kai, Ko Mo and Ko Thap.
Ko Poda is an island off the west coast of Thailand, in Krabi Province, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) from Ao Nang. It is part of the Mu Ko Poda, or Poda Group Islands, which are under the administration of Hat Nopharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park. The group consists of Ko Poda, Ko Kai, Ko Mo and Ko Thap.
857-92935 - Ko Poda is an island off the west coast of Thailand, in Krabi Province, about 8 kilometres (5 mi) from Ao Nang. It is part of the Mu Ko Poda, or Poda Group Islands, which are under the administration of Hat Nopharat Thara-Mu Ko Phi Phi National Park. The group consists of Ko Poda, Ko Kai, Ko Mo and Ko Thap.
Three participants of the UTMB are running in the hills of Chamonix. The famous peaks of the Mont Blanc range are in the background. The Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (also referred to as UTMB) is a single-stage mountain ultramarathon. It takes place once a year in the Alps, across France, Italy and Switzerland. The distance is approximately 166 kilometres (103 mi), with a total elevation gain of around 9,600 m. It is widely regarded as one of the most difficult foot races in Europe. It's certainly one of the largest with over two thousand starters. The combined participation in all of the events is approaching 10 thousand runners. While the best runners complete the loop in slightly more than 20 hours, most runners take 30 to 45 hours to reach the finish line.
857-92685 - Three participants of the UTMB are running in the hills of Chamonix. The famous peaks of the Mont Blanc range are in the background. The Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (also referred to as UTMB) is a single-stage mountain ultramarathon. It takes place once a year in the Alps, across France, Italy and Switzerland. The distance is approximately 166 kilometres (103 mi), with a total elevation gain of around 9,600 m. It is widely regarded as one of the most difficult foot races in Europe. It's certainly one of the largest with over two thousand starters. The combined participation in all of the events is approaching 10 thousand runners. While the best runners complete the loop in slightly more than 20 hours, most runners take 30 to 45 hours to reach the finish line.
An elderly woman is running in the hills of Chamonix. She is close to finishing the extremely exhausting UTMB race. The Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (also referred to as UTMB) is a single-stage mountain ultramarathon. It takes place once a year in the Alps, across France, Italy and Switzerland. The distance is approximately 166 kilometres (103 mi), with a total elevation gain of around 9,600 m. It is widely regarded as one of the most difficult foot races in Europe. It's certainly one of the largest with over two thousand starters. The combined participation in all of the events is approaching 10 thousand runners. While the best runners complete the loop in slightly more than 20 hours, most runners take 30 to 45 hours to reach the finish line.
857-92684 - An elderly woman is running in the hills of Chamonix. She is close to finishing the extremely exhausting UTMB race. The Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (also referred to as UTMB) is a single-stage mountain ultramarathon. It takes place once a year in the Alps, across France, Italy and Switzerland. The distance is approximately 166 kilometres (103 mi), with a total elevation gain of around 9,600 m. It is widely regarded as one of the most difficult foot races in Europe. It's certainly one of the largest with over two thousand starters. The combined participation in all of the events is approaching 10 thousand runners. While the best runners complete the loop in slightly more than 20 hours, most runners take 30 to 45 hours to reach the finish line.
European Perch in a backwater of the River Ain, France
860-286136 - European Perch in a backwater of the River Ain, France
European Beaver dam on a backwater of the river Ain, France
860-286131 - European Beaver dam on a backwater of the river Ain, France
A girl walks on a submerged log near Hiawatha National Forest MI.
857-87835 - A girl walks on a submerged log near Hiawatha National Forest MI.
State Capitol Building in Lansing, Michigan, USA
1178-12537 - State Capitol Building in Lansing, Michigan, USA
Lansing, Michigan - State Capitol Building at sunrise
1178-12538 - Lansing, Michigan - State Capitol Building at sunrise
Lansing, Michigan - State Capitol Building at sunrise
1178-7017 - Lansing, Michigan - State Capitol Building at sunrise
Lansing, Michigan - State Capitol Building at sunrise
1178-7019 - Lansing, Michigan - State Capitol Building at sunrise
Pretty woman hiking in the Aletsch Glacier, Valais, Switzerland. The Great Aletsch Glacier is the largest glacier in the Alps. It has a length of about 23 km (14 mi) and covers more than 120 square kilometres (46 sq mi) in the eastern Bernese Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais.
857-85728 - Pretty woman hiking in the Aletsch Glacier, Valais, Switzerland. The Great Aletsch Glacier is the largest glacier in the Alps. It has a length of about 23 km (14 mi) and covers more than 120 square kilometres (46 sq mi) in the eastern Bernese Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais.
The Aletsch Glacier or Great Aletsch Glacier is the largest glacier in the Alps. It has a length of about 23 km (14 mi) and covers more than 120 square kilometres (46 sq mi) in the eastern Bernese Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais. The Aletsch Glacier is composed of three smaller glaciers converging at Concordia, where its thickness is estimated to be near 1 km (3,300 ft). It then continues towards the Rhone valley before giving birth to the Massa River.
857-85720 - The Aletsch Glacier or Great Aletsch Glacier is the largest glacier in the Alps. It has a length of about 23 km (14 mi) and covers more than 120 square kilometres (46 sq mi) in the eastern Bernese Alps in the Swiss canton of Valais. The Aletsch Glacier is composed of three smaller glaciers converging at Concordia, where its thickness is estimated to be near 1 km (3,300 ft). It then continues towards the Rhone valley before giving birth to the Massa River.
MIL MI-24 Hind, Russian attack helicopter from the Hungarian Air Force painted like an eagle, Breitscheid Airshow 2010, Hesse, Germany, Europe
832-124528 - MIL MI-24 Hind, Russian attack helicopter from the Hungarian Air Force painted like an eagle, Breitscheid Airshow 2010, Hesse, Germany, Europe
Statue of the poet Nez&mi, Baku, Azerbaijan, Caucasus, Middle East
832-115963 - Statue of the poet Nez&mi, Baku, Azerbaijan, Caucasus, Middle East
Lively beach, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
832-60850 - Lively beach, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
Lively beach, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
832-60851 - Lively beach, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
A green lamp and solar panels on a pole, navigation light, aids to navigation, Mi&dzyzdroje beach resort, Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, West Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland, Europe
832-60853 - A green lamp and solar panels on a pole, navigation light, aids to navigation, Mi&dzyzdroje beach resort, Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, West Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland, Europe
Pier, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
832-60847 - Pier, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
Amber Baltic Hotel, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
832-60849 - Amber Baltic Hotel, seaside resort of Mi&dzyzdroje or Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, Western Pomerania, Poland, Europe, PublicGround
Hotels on the coast, Mi&dzyzdroje beach resort, Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, West Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland, Europe
832-60857 - Hotels on the coast, Mi&dzyzdroje beach resort, Misdroy, Wolin Island, Baltic Sea, West Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland, Europe
Town of Mivagur, Vagar Island, Faroe Islands, island group in the North Atlantic, Denmark, Northern Europe
832-40583 - Town of Mivagur, Vagar Island, Faroe Islands, island group in the North Atlantic, Denmark, Northern Europe
Heliskiing Kamchatka, Sibiria, Russia, a MI-8 helicopter
1113-80141 - Heliskiing Kamchatka, Sibiria, Russia, a MI-8 helicopter
Cemetery in Autumn Fall MI Resting place Michigan
817-408981 - Cemetery in Autumn Fall MI Resting place Michigan
Walking Suspension Bridge Over Water In Autumn Fall MI
817-408986 - Walking Suspension Bridge Over Water In Autumn Fall MI
Walking Suspension Bridge Over Water In Autumn Fall MI
817-408985 - Walking Suspension Bridge Over Water In Autumn Fall MI
Bend in the Kazym River as seen from a Russian built Mi-8 helicopter, Siberia, Russia
857-11976 - Bend in the Kazym River as seen from a Russian built Mi-8 helicopter, Siberia, Russia
Holland Harbor Lighthouse.
857-16651 - Holland Harbor Lighthouse.
Holland Harbor Lighthouse.
857-16652 - Holland Harbor Lighthouse.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4380 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Point Wild on Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
979-4952 - Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Point Wild on Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4596 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4354 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62ø57'S 60ø36'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-7087 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62ø57'S 60ø36'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of the volcanic island Surtsey (Icelandic, meaning "Surtur's island"), the southernmost point of Iceland. MORE INFO Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 130 metres (426 ft) below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi). Since then, wind and wave erosion have caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2002, its surface area was 1.4 km2 (0.54 sq mi).
979-9048 - Views of the volcanic island Surtsey (Icelandic, meaning "Surtur's island"), the southernmost point of Iceland. MORE INFO Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 130 metres (426 ft) below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi). Since then, wind and wave erosion have caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2002, its surface area was 1.4 km2 (0.54 sq mi).
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7485 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4363 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4592 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4389 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4375 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4603 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4379 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4598 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8316 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8308 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4383 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4356 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4371 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4382 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4361 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4350 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8312 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Point Wild on Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
979-4951 - Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Point Wild on Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4376 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Commercial ferries taking people and vehicles from one side to the other in Sognefjord, Norway. MORE INFO The Sognefjord (Sognefjorden) is the largest fjord in Norway, and the second longest in the world, after Scoresby Sund on Greenland. Located in Sogn og Fjordane it stretches 205 km (127 mi) inland to the small village of Skjolden.
979-9039 - Commercial ferries taking people and vehicles from one side to the other in Sognefjord, Norway. MORE INFO The Sognefjord (Sognefjorden) is the largest fjord in Norway, and the second longest in the world, after Scoresby Sund on Greenland. Located in Sogn og Fjordane it stretches 205 km (127 mi) inland to the small village of Skjolden.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4601 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4355 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4377 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of the volcanic island Surtsey (Icelandic, meaning "Surtur's island"), the southernmost point of Iceland. MORE INFO Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 130 metres (426 ft) below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi). Since then, wind and wave erosion have caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2002, its surface area was 1.4 km2 (0.54 sq mi).
979-9052 - Views of the volcanic island Surtsey (Icelandic, meaning "Surtur's island"), the southernmost point of Iceland. MORE INFO Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 130 metres (426 ft) below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi). Since then, wind and wave erosion have caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2002, its surface area was 1.4 km2 (0.54 sq mi).
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4353 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4386 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4591 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of the volcanic island Surtsey (Icelandic, meaning "Surtur's island"), the southernmost point of Iceland. MORE INFO Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 130 metres (426 ft) below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi). Since then, wind and wave erosion have caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2002, its surface area was 1.4 km2 (0.54 sq mi).
979-9049 - Views of the volcanic island Surtsey (Icelandic, meaning "Surtur's island"), the southernmost point of Iceland. MORE INFO Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 130 metres (426 ft) below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi). Since then, wind and wave erosion have caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2002, its surface area was 1.4 km2 (0.54 sq mi).
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4362 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4359 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62ø57'S 60ø36'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-7085 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62ø57'S 60ø36'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8307 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8310 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4593 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
979-7175 - Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4348 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4604 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62ø57'S 60ø36'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-7084 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62ø57'S 60ø36'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4365 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4370 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4360 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4358 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4597 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4590 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4388 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4369 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8315 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4381 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4600 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of the Aurlandsfjord, an arm of the Sognefjord, Norway. MORE INFO The Sognefjord (Sognefjorden) is the largest fjord in Norway, and the second longest in the world, after Scoresby Sund on Greenland. Located in Sogn og Fjordane it stretches 205 km (127 mi) inland to the small village of Skjolden.
979-9037 - Views of the Aurlandsfjord, an arm of the Sognefjord, Norway. MORE INFO The Sognefjord (Sognefjorden) is the largest fjord in Norway, and the second longest in the world, after Scoresby Sund on Greenland. Located in Sogn og Fjordane it stretches 205 km (127 mi) inland to the small village of Skjolden.
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7483 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4390 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Adult Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7482 - Adult Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7484 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4352 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
979-8313 - A small group of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) migrating north to feeding grounds in the spring from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO also known as the reindeer this animal travels the furthest of any terrestrial mammal, traveling up to 5,000 km (3,100 mi) a year. The caribou can run at speeds of 60?80 km/h (37?50 mph). Caribou often use the ice road for ease of travel through deep snow areas.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4589 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4599 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4374 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Commercial ferries taking people and vehicles from one side to the other in Sognefjord, Norway. MORE INFO The Sognefjord (Sognefjorden) is the largest fjord in Norway, and the second longest in the world, after Scoresby Sund on Greenland. Located in Sogn og Fjordane it stretches 205 km (127 mi) inland to the small village of Skjolden.
979-9040 - Commercial ferries taking people and vehicles from one side to the other in Sognefjord, Norway. MORE INFO The Sognefjord (Sognefjorden) is the largest fjord in Norway, and the second longest in the world, after Scoresby Sund on Greenland. Located in Sogn og Fjordane it stretches 205 km (127 mi) inland to the small village of Skjolden.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4373 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4368 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.