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1315-88 - Tourist in Cathedral Square (Plaza de la Catedral) in Old Havana, Havana, Cuba. Model release 239
lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris, and scuba diver, West End, Little Bahama Bank, off Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean, Model Released MR-000054
983-645 - lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris, and scuba diver, West End, Little Bahama Bank, off Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean, Model Released MR-000054
ocean sunfish, Mola mola, and snorkeler with underwater video camera, off San Diego, California, USA, East Paficic Ocean, Model Released MR-000088
983-658 - ocean sunfish, Mola mola, and snorkeler with underwater video camera, off San Diego, California, USA, East Paficic Ocean, Model Released MR-000088
scuba divers and manta ray, Manta birostris, feeding at night, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean, model released
983-656 - scuba divers and manta ray, Manta birostris, feeding at night, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean, model released
scuba divers and manta ray, Manta birostris, feeding at night, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean, model released
983-655 - scuba divers and manta ray, Manta birostris, feeding at night, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean, model released
Couple Spiaggia Capriccioli Costa Smeralda Sardinia Italy
832-377953 - Couple Spiaggia Capriccioli Costa Smeralda Sardinia Italy
Woman and child running in water at Cala Brandinchi Beach eastcoast Sardinia Italy
832-377950 - Woman and child running in water at Cala Brandinchi Beach eastcoast Sardinia Italy
Child riding on its scooter at the coast, Peloponnese, Greece
832-374894 - Child riding on its scooter at the coast, Peloponnese, Greece
Couple in love at Cala Brandinchi Sardinia Italy
832-377951 - Couple in love at Cala Brandinchi Sardinia Italy
Hiker resting in slot canyon, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona, Model release
1173-2264 - Hiker resting in slot canyon, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona, Model release
Hikers in canyon, Escalante River, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, Model release
1173-2064 - Hikers in canyon, Escalante River, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, Model release
Hiker in slot canyon, Escalante River, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, Model release
1173-2192 - Hiker in slot canyon, Escalante River, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, Model release
Visitor in Antelope Canyon, Arizona, Model release
1173-2266 - Visitor in Antelope Canyon, Arizona, Model release
Hiker resting in slot canyon, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona, Model release
1173-2263 - Hiker resting in slot canyon, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona, Model release
Hiker on canopy walkway, Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve, Costa Rica, model release
1173-4251 - Hiker on canopy walkway, Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve, Costa Rica, model release
Visitor in Antelope Canyon, Arizona, Model release
1173-2265 - Visitor in Antelope Canyon, Arizona, Model release
Dripstone Caves of Dirou, Peloponnese, Greece
832-365786 - Dripstone Caves of Dirou, Peloponnese, Greece
A helicopter filming a tow, in surfer at Peahi Jaws off Maui Hawaii
869-4224 - A helicopter filming a tow, in surfer at Peahi Jaws off Maui Hawaii
black-striped salema A diver photographer passes through a school of salema endemic Galapagos Islands Equador
869-4157 - black-striped salema A diver photographer passes through a school of salema endemic Galapagos Islands Equador
A helicopter filming a tow, in surfer at Peahi Jaws off Maui Hawaii
869-4225 - A helicopter filming a tow, in surfer at Peahi Jaws off Maui Hawaii
A tow, in surfer drops to the curl of Hawaii's big surf at Peahi Jaws off Maui
869-4222 - A tow, in surfer drops to the curl of Hawaii's big surf at Peahi Jaws off Maui
The Ahlbeck pier is a pier on the Baltic Sea The pier is 280 meters long It was built in 1882 and rebuilt several times, Ahlbeck, Usedom Island, County Vorpommern-Greifswald, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, Europe, No Model Release available!
817-423365 - The Ahlbeck pier is a pier on the Baltic Sea The pier is 280 meters long It was built in 1882 and rebuilt several times, Ahlbeck, Usedom Island, County Vorpommern-Greifswald, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, Europe, No Model Release available!
The City Hall of Wernigerode is considered one of the most beautiful City Halls in Europe, Wernigerode, Harz, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, Europe, No Model Release available!
817-423324 - The City Hall of Wernigerode is considered one of the most beautiful City Halls in Europe, Wernigerode, Harz, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, Europe, No Model Release available!
St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia, Port Elizabeth, Sargeant Brothers Model Boat Shop, model maker
817-419958 - St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia, Port Elizabeth, Sargeant Brothers Model Boat Shop, model maker
St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia, Port Elizabeth, Mauvins Model Boat Shop, model maker
817-419972 - St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia, Port Elizabeth, Mauvins Model Boat Shop, model maker
St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia, Port Elizabeth, Mauvins Model Boat Shop, model maker
817-419973 - St Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia, Port Elizabeth, Mauvins Model Boat Shop, model maker
Messerschmidt 109 and scuba diver, Mediterranean Sea, Ile de Planier, Marseille, France
1113-84019 - Messerschmidt 109 and scuba diver, Mediterranean Sea, Ile de Planier, Marseille, France
Messerschmidt 109, Mediterranean Sea, Ile de Planier, Marseille, France
1113-84021 - Messerschmidt 109, Mediterranean Sea, Ile de Planier, Marseille, France
Taucher im Gebirgssee und Koenig Ludwig Nixe, Deutschland, Bayern|Scuba diver in mountain lake, King Ludwig mermaid, Germany, Bavaria
1113-72072 - Taucher im Gebirgssee und Koenig Ludwig Nixe, Deutschland, Bayern|Scuba diver in mountain lake, King Ludwig mermaid, Germany, Bavaria
Unbekanntes Schiffswrack und Taucher, Papua Neu Guinea, Bismark Sea|Unknown ship wreck and scuba diver, Papua New Guinea, Bismark Sea
1113-72075 - Unbekanntes Schiffswrack und Taucher, Papua Neu Guinea, Bismark Sea|Unknown ship wreck and scuba diver, Papua New Guinea, Bismark Sea
Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
1113-66603 - Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
1113-66601 - Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
1113-66602 - Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
1113-66600 - Couple at Spiaggia Capriccioli, Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy
Cala di Luna Beach, Sardinia, Italy
1113-66568 - Cala di Luna Beach, Sardinia, Italy
Cala di Luna Beach, Sardinia, Italy
1113-66569 - Cala di Luna Beach, Sardinia, Italy
Scuba Diving in Tamariu, Tamariu, Costa Brava, Mediterranean Sea, Spain
1113-16344 - Scuba Diving in Tamariu, Tamariu, Costa Brava, Mediterranean Sea, Spain
Jeep Tour in White Desert National Park, Egypt, Libyan Desert
1113-14609 - Jeep Tour in White Desert National Park, Egypt, Libyan Desert
Mammography. model release. sweden
1192-56 - Mammography. model release. sweden
An electronic bus card in Luxembourg. Visitor. model release
1192-120 - An electronic bus card in Luxembourg. Visitor. model release
A young kangaroo is feed with a bottle. the mother has been killed in the traffic. wa. australia. model release
1192-70 - A young kangaroo is feed with a bottle. the mother has been killed in the traffic. wa. australia. model release
Pigs on the organic farm. model release. sweden
1192-8 - Pigs on the organic farm. model release. sweden
Half nude female practicing apnea in the clear waters of Formentera, Balearic Islands, Spain
817-384474 - Half nude female practicing apnea in the clear waters of Formentera, Balearic Islands, Spain
Half nude female practicing apnea in the clear waters of Formentera, Balearic Islands, Spain
817-384476 - Half nude female practicing apnea in the clear waters of Formentera, Balearic Islands, Spain
Half nude female practicing apnea in the clear waters of Formentera, Balearic Islands, Spain
817-384473 - Half nude female practicing apnea in the clear waters of Formentera, Balearic Islands, Spain
Kayaking in the slough in the small town of Petersburg in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6657 - Kayaking in the slough in the small town of Petersburg in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Lindblad Expeditions Guest taking photos inside sea grotto in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. No model or property release are available for this image.
979-6004 - Lindblad Expeditions Guest taking photos inside sea grotto in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. No model or property release are available for this image.
Long-beaked Common Dolphin pod (Delphinus capensis) encountered in Zodiac off Isla Danzante in the southern Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Sur, Mexico. No model release is available for this image.
979-5652 - Long-beaked Common Dolphin pod (Delphinus capensis) encountered in Zodiac off Isla Danzante in the southern Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Sur, Mexico. No model release is available for this image.
Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
979-6027 - Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
Lindblad Expeditions staff member kayaking on Isla San Francisco in the lower Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Norte, Mexico. Model Release #SD0408.
979-3375 - Lindblad Expeditions staff member kayaking on Isla San Francisco in the lower Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Norte, Mexico. Model Release #SD0408.
The Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Sea Bird operating Zodiacs in Southeast Alaska, USA. No property or model release available for this image.
979-7014 - The Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Sea Bird operating Zodiacs in Southeast Alaska, USA. No property or model release available for this image.
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6651 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
979-5313 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
Adult arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea) defending a nest site from encroaching human on Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The arctic tern makes one of the longest annual migrations of any animal on Earth, flying from the high Arctic all the way to Antarctica and back. This is perhaps as much as 40,000 km in a single year! No model release available for this image.
979-5324 - Adult arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea) defending a nest site from encroaching human on Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The arctic tern makes one of the longest annual migrations of any animal on Earth, flying from the high Arctic all the way to Antarctica and back. This is perhaps as much as 40,000 km in a single year! No model release available for this image.
Adult gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) leaping into the Zodiac, much to the surprise of Bud Lenhausen, A Lindblad staff member, in Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay, Antarctica.  There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Model release number BL1107.
979-2396 - Adult gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) leaping into the Zodiac, much to the surprise of Bud Lenhausen, A Lindblad staff member, in Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay, Antarctica. There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Model release number BL1107.
Kayaking in Red Bluff Bay on Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Kayak property release is DB051905. Model released numbers BM0807, JP0807, or DP0807.
979-2414 - Kayaking in Red Bluff Bay on Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Kayak property release is DB051905. Model released numbers BM0807, JP0807, or DP0807.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore filming the Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), which is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release JS0209.
979-3925 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore filming the Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), which is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release JS0209.
Adult gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) leaping into the Zodiac, much to the surprise of Bud Lenhausen, A Lindblad staff member, in Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay, Antarctica.  There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Model release number BL1107.
979-2395 - Adult gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) leaping into the Zodiac, much to the surprise of Bud Lenhausen, A Lindblad staff member, in Neko Harbour in Andvord Bay, Antarctica. There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Model release number BL1107.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3934 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
979-5315 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
Processing the wild-caught salmon catch at Norquest Cannery in Petesburg, Southeast Alaska. No model release.
979-2121 - Processing the wild-caught salmon catch at Norquest Cannery in Petesburg, Southeast Alaska. No model release.
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6650 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Purse-seiners operating in Red Bluff Bay, Baranof Island, Southeast Alaska. These vessels are fishing for salmon. No property or model release.
979-2128 - Purse-seiners operating in Red Bluff Bay, Baranof Island, Southeast Alaska. These vessels are fishing for salmon. No property or model release.
Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
979-6026 - Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3931 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Where the desert meets the sea; a snorkeler at Isla Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO A unique half above and half below the water look at this oceanic island (it has never been attached to either the mainland of Mexico, or the Baja peninsula). Model release #CT0410.
979-8377 - Where the desert meets the sea; a snorkeler at Isla Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO A unique half above and half below the water look at this oceanic island (it has never been attached to either the mainland of Mexico, or the Baja peninsula). Model release #CT0410.
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6655 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
979-5311 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
The Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Sea Bird operating in Southeast Alaska, USA. No property or model release available for this image.
979-6976 - The Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Sea Bird operating in Southeast Alaska, USA. No property or model release available for this image.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3932 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Head chef Tommi of the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour at  play in Antarctica. No model release.
979-2376 - Head chef Tommi of the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour at play in Antarctica. No model release.
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6648 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Staff from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour doing various things in and around the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Model release number JD0509.
979-6053 - Staff from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour doing various things in and around the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Model release number JD0509.
Adult gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) porpoising amongst kayakers near Cuverville Island at the northern end of the Errera Channel in Antarctica. Southern Ocean. Model Release # KL1107 for kayakers. There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica.
979-2398 - Adult gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) porpoising amongst kayakers near Cuverville Island at the northern end of the Errera Channel in Antarctica. Southern Ocean. Model Release # KL1107 for kayakers. There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica.
Kayaking in the slough in the small town of Petersburg in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6656 - Kayaking in the slough in the small town of Petersburg in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
National Geographic Photographer Ralph Lee Hopkins with a walrus skull (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) on the tundra off Freemansundet in the Svalbard Archipelago in the Barents Sea, Norway. While isolated Atlantic males can weigh as much as 4,000 lb, most weigh between 1,500 and 3,500 lb. Females weigh about two thirds as much as males. The most prominent physical feature of the walrus is its long tusks, actually elongated canines, which are present in both sexes and can reach a length of over 3 ft and weigh up to 12 lb. No model release for this photo.
979-5227 - National Geographic Photographer Ralph Lee Hopkins with a walrus skull (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) on the tundra off Freemansundet in the Svalbard Archipelago in the Barents Sea, Norway. While isolated Atlantic males can weigh as much as 4,000 lb, most weigh between 1,500 and 3,500 lb. Females weigh about two thirds as much as males. The most prominent physical feature of the walrus is its long tusks, actually elongated canines, which are present in both sexes and can reach a length of over 3 ft and weigh up to 12 lb. No model release for this photo.
Processing the salmon catch at Norquest Cannery in Petesburg, Southeast Alaska. No model release.
979-2139 - Processing the salmon catch at Norquest Cannery in Petesburg, Southeast Alaska. No model release.
Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
979-6018 - Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6653 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Processing the wild-caught salmon catch at Norquest Cannery in Petesburg, Southeast Alaska. No model release.
979-2122 - Processing the wild-caught salmon catch at Norquest Cannery in Petesburg, Southeast Alaska. No model release.
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6649 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3933 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Canadian photographer Gilles Pucheu at work near his home in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO Model release number GP032810.
979-8295 - Canadian photographer Gilles Pucheu at work near his home in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO Model release number GP032810.
Chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica) colony near Point Wild on Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. This is where Sir Ernest Shackleton's men stayed for 131 days until rescue on August 30, 1916. There are an estimated 2 million breeding pairs of chinstrap penguins in the Antarctic peninsula region alone, perhaps as many as 7.5 million breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Model Release Marcus Heneen, # MH1107.
979-2378 - Chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica) colony near Point Wild on Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. This is where Sir Ernest Shackleton's men stayed for 131 days until rescue on August 30, 1916. There are an estimated 2 million breeding pairs of chinstrap penguins in the Antarctic peninsula region alone, perhaps as many as 7.5 million breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Model Release Marcus Heneen, # MH1107.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
979-5312 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3936 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) with excited visitor on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth. No model release for this image.
979-4664 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) with excited visitor on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth. No model release for this image.
Kayaking in Red Bluff Bay on Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Kayak property release is DB051905. Model released numbers BM0807, JP0807, or DP0807.
979-2411 - Kayaking in Red Bluff Bay on Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Kayak property release is DB051905. Model released numbers BM0807, JP0807, or DP0807.
Canadian photographer Marianne Pucheu in Arctic clothing near her home in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO Model release number MP032810.
979-8306 - Canadian photographer Marianne Pucheu in Arctic clothing near her home in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. MORE INFO Model release number MP032810.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3935 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
The Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Sea Bird operating in Misty Fjord National Monument, USA. No property or model release available for this image.
979-7011 - The Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Sea Bird operating in Misty Fjord National Monument, USA. No property or model release available for this image.
Lindblad Expeditions Guests exploring a sea grotto by Zodiac in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. No model or property release are available for this image.
979-6019 - Lindblad Expeditions Guests exploring a sea grotto by Zodiac in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. No model or property release are available for this image.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) with excited visitor on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth. No model release for this image.
979-4661 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) with excited visitor on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth. No model release for this image.
Kayaking in Red Bluff Bay on Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Kayak property release is DB051905. Model released numbers BM0807, JP0807, or DP0807.
979-2410 - Kayaking in Red Bluff Bay on Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Kayak property release is DB051905. Model released numbers BM0807, JP0807, or DP0807.
Where the desert meets the sea; a snorkeler at Isla Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO A unique half above and half below the water look at this oceanic island (it has never been attached to either the mainland of Mexico, or the Baja peninsula). Model release #CT0410.
979-8379 - Where the desert meets the sea; a snorkeler at Isla Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO A unique half above and half below the water look at this oceanic island (it has never been attached to either the mainland of Mexico, or the Baja peninsula). Model release #CT0410.
The Lindblad expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion staff diving off the sandstone cliffs at Isla San Jose in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) near the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. No model release is available for this image.
979-6212 - The Lindblad expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion staff diving off the sandstone cliffs at Isla San Jose in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) near the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. No model release is available for this image.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
979-5314 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning with young boaters off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific. Model release #SM0609
Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6647 - Kayaking from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion in the fog in Tracy Arm in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
The Lindblad expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion staff diving off the sandstone cliffs at Isla San Jose in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) near the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. No model release is available for this image.
979-6213 - The Lindblad expedition ship National Geographic Sea Lion staff diving off the sandstone cliffs at Isla San Jose in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) near the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. No model release is available for this image.
Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.
979-6022 - Lindblad Expeditions Guests doing fun and exciting things in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Model release number SMB0509.