Robert Harding

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746-88440 - Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) feeding on carrion (roadkill used as bait) during the night. The Tasmanian Devil is the largest of the Dasyuridae, strictly protected and endangered. They are primarily nocturnal and opportunists feeding mostly on carrion, Australia, Tasmania
746-88441 - Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) feeding on carrion (roadkill used as bait) during the night. The Tasmanian Devil is the largest of the Dasyuridae, strictly protected and endangered. They are primarily nocturnal and opportunists feeding mostly on carrion, Australia, Tasmania
832-281417 - Church bell in the bell tower in front of blue ceramics dome of the baroque basilica from the 17th century, basilica Santa Maria, Elx, Elche, Costa Blanca, Spain
832-281415 - Church bell in the bell tower in front of blue ceramics dome of the baroque basilica from the 17th century, basilica Santa Maria, Elx, Elche, Costa Blanca, Spain
817-449175 - Statues of two baroque musicians, palace gardens in front of the Electoral Palace, covering its ears with its hands, symbolic image for loud music and noise, Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Europe.
829-829 - Chief Petty Officer Dudley Malgas of the South African Navy posing alongside the noon gun cannon in Cape Town. CPO Malgas has been in charge of firing the canon since 1995. The daily noon gun is Cape Town’s oldest living tradition and the two cannons used are the oldest guns in daily use in the world. They have marked the midday hour in the mother city in this distinctive, albeit noisy manner since early 1806. The cannons were cast in Britain in 1794 and still bear the royal crest of King George the third. The firing of the cannon was originally to give ships in the bay a means of re-setting their clocks accurately.
829-828 - Chief Petty Officer Dudley Malgas using a wooden ram rod to push the charge into the muzzle of the noon gun cannon in Cape Town. The daily noon gun is Cape Town’s oldest living tradition and the two cannons used are the oldest guns in daily use in the world. They have marked the midday hour in the mother city in this distinctive, albeit noisy manner since early 1806. The cannons were cast in Britain in 1794 and still bear the royal crest of King George the third. The firing of the cannon was originally to give ships in the bay a means of re-setting their clocks accurately.
829-830 - View of one of the two noon guns at Lion Battery on Signal Hill in Cape Town. The daily noon gun is Cape Town’s oldest living tradition and the two cannons used are the oldest guns in daily use in the world. They have marked the midday hour in the mother city in this distinctive, albeit noisy manner since early 1806. The cannons were cast in Britain in 1794 and still bear the royal crest of King George the third. The firing of the cannon was originally to give ships in the bay a means of re-setting their clocks accurately.
829-831 - The noon gun firing in Cape Town. The daily noon gun is Cape Town’s oldest living tradition and the two cannons used are the oldest guns in daily use in the world. They have marked the midday hour in the mother city in this distinctive, albeit noisy manner since early 1806. The cannons were cast in Britain in 1794 and still bear the royal crest of King George the third. The firing of the cannon was originally to give ships in the bay a means of re-setting their clocks accurately.
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