Robert Harding

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860-287459 - Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. diving Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus); Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed.
860-287450 - Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time ? a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos
1116-40063 - A Reef Manta Ray (Mobula (formerly Manta) alfredi) hovers over a reef cleaning station off the Kona Coast, the Big Island, Hawaii, USA. This particular female manta with a missing left cephalic lobe has been observed by divers and snorkelers at Kona since
1116-40062 - Endemic Hawaiian Saddle Wrasse (Thalassoma duperrey) approach to clean a Reef Manta Ray (Mobula (formerly Manta) alfredi) of parasites at a reef cleaning station off the Kona Coast, the Big Island, Hawaii, USA. This particular female manta with a missing
832-327022 - Steel tanks for storing the "liqueur d'expedition" giving champagne its particular flavour, Kessler sparkling winery, Esslingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, Europe
857-33933 - Women in burqas flock like doves to the entrance of the main mosque at the Blue Mosque complex, Mazar-i-Sharif, Balkh Province, September 23, 2002. Wednesday mornings are reserved for women to come and worship at the mosque.Elaborate tilework and decorated spires adorn the mosque, also known as the Shrine of Hazrat Ali (Hazrat Ali was the son-in-law of the prophet Mohammed), who is believed to be buried here. The shrine, of particular importance for Afghanistan's Shi'ite Muslims, was first built in the 12th century, destroyed by Genghis Khan, and rebuilt in 1481. The current mosque, considered by some to be one of the most beautiful in Central Asia, is a modern restoration.
857-33936 - A man feeds white doves at dawn in front of the Blue Mosque, Mazar-i-Sharif, Balkh Province. Hundreds of doves, who are fed by worshippers and tended by special workers, live around the mosque, and it is thought that the place is so holy that a grey or brown dove will turn white if it lands on the Mosque. The mosque is also known as the Shrine of Hazrat Ali (Hazrat Ali was the son-in-law of the prophet Mohammed), who is believed to be buried here. The shrine, of particular importance for Afghanistan's Shi'ite Muslims, was first built in the 12th century, destroyed by Genghis Khan, and rebuilt in 1481. The current mosque, considered by some to be one of the most beautiful in Central Asia, is a modern restoration.
857-33935 - Tajik women proudly pose with their children, burqa's thrown back, in front of the main entrance to the Blue Mosque, Mazar-i-Sharif, Balkh Province. Wednesday mornings are reserved for women to come and worship at the mosque. Elaborate tilework and decorated spires adorn the mosque, also known as the Shrine of Hazrat Ali (Hazrat Ali was the son-in-law of the prophet Mohammed), who is believed to be buried here. The shrine, of particular importance for Afghanistan's Shi'ite Muslims, was first built in the 12th century, destroyed by Genghis Khan, and rebuilt in 1481. The current mosque, considered by some to be one of the most beautiful in Central Asia, is a modern restoration.
988-115 - American mink (Mustela vison). Non-native species in the UK considered a threat to ground-nesting birds and water voles in particular. Widespread as a result of escapes from fur farms since the 1950s. Hebrides, Scotland
988-112 - American mink (Mustela vison). Non-native species in the UK considered a threat to ground-nesting birds and water voles in particular. Widespread as a result of escapes from fur farms since the 1950s. Hebrides, Scotland
988-113 - American mink (Mustela vison). Non-native species in the UK considered a threat to ground-nesting birds and water voles in particular. Widespread as a result of escapes from fur farms since the 1950s. Hebrides, Scotland
988-114 - American mink (Mustela vison). Non-native species in the UK considered a threat to ground-nesting birds and water voles in particular. Widespread as a result of escapes from fur farms since the 1950s. Hebrides, Scotland
988-110 - American mink (Mustela vison). Non-native species in the UK considered a threat to ground-nesting birds and water voles in particular. Widespread as a result of escapes from fur farms since the 1950s. Hebrides, Scotland
988-111 - American mink (Mustela vison). Non-native species in the UK considered a threat to ground-nesting birds and water voles in particular. Widespread as a result of escapes from fur farms since the 1950s. Hebrides, Scotland
917-407 - Flying Squid Species in mid-air (Ommastrephes bartramii). Extremely rare unusual image. South Atlantic Ocean. MORE INFO: Flying Squid use membranes between their tentacles (visible on pic) & two fins at the rear of the mantle to glide through the air in a similar way to flying fish. These unique adaptations allow them to avoid predation more easily. Ommastrephid squids are among the strongest swimmers in the Cephalopoda. A number of species are fished commercially. This particular species (Ommastrephes bartramii), is commonly known as "Neon Flying Squid" due to its colouration and its ability to glide over the ocean surface as seen in the photographs. Please note that this is a genuine image of a wild animal in its natural environment. It is not a digital manipulation.
917-406 - Flying Squid Species in mid-air (Ommastrephes bartramii). Extremely rare unusual image. South Atlantic Ocean. MORE INFO: Flying Squid use membranes between their tentacles (visible on pic) & two fins at the rear of the mantle to glide through the air in a similar way to flying fish. These unique adaptations allow them to avoid predation more easily. Ommastrephid squids are among the strongest swimmers in the Cephalopoda. A number of species are fished commercially. This particular species (Ommastrephes bartramii), is commonly known as "Neon Flying Squid" due to its colouration and its ability to glide over the ocean surface as seen in the photographs. Please note that this is a genuine image of a wild animal in its natural environment. It is not a digital manipulation.
917-405 - Flying Squid Species in mid-air (Ommastrephes bartramii). Extremely rare unusual image. South Atlantic Ocean. MORE INFO: Flying Squid use membranes between their tentacles (visible on pic) & two fins at the rear of the mantle to glide through the air in a similar way to flying fish. These unique adaptations allow them to avoid predation more easily. Ommastrephid squids are among the strongest swimmers in the Cephalopoda. A number of species are fished commercially. This particular species (Ommastrephes bartramii), is commonly known as "Neon Flying Squid" due to its colouration and its ability to glide over the ocean surface as seen in the photographs. Please note that this is a genuine image of a wild animal in its natural environment. It is not a digital manipulation.
763-761 - Folk art particular to the Cuzco area are the small bulls or 'toritos' placed on roofs of new homes to bring good luck to inhabitants, Cuzco, Highlands, Peru
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