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Elephant seal (mirounga leonina) lying in snow, south georgia
1198-262 - Elephant seal (mirounga leonina) lying in snow, south georgia
Harbor seal, common seal, phoca vitulina, female, oregon, west coast
1190-295 - Harbor seal, common seal, phoca vitulina, female, oregon, west coast
Northern elephant seal (mirounga angustirostris) male portrait, san benitos island, baja, mexico
1198-169 - Northern elephant seal (mirounga angustirostris) male portrait, san benitos island, baja, mexico
Northern elephant seal (mirounga angustirostris) female calling, tongue out, san benitos island, baja, mexico
1198-96 - Northern elephant seal (mirounga angustirostris) female calling, tongue out, san benitos island, baja, mexico
Weddell seal (leptonychotes weddellii) ross,antarctica
1198-681 - Weddell seal (leptonychotes weddellii) ross,antarctica
Southern  seal (mirounga leonina) gold harbour, south georgia, aggressive bull on the beach, bellowing, beachmaster.
1198-788 - Southern seal (mirounga leonina) gold harbour, south georgia, aggressive bull on the beach, bellowing, beachmaster.
Southern elephant seal. Mirounga leonina. Gentoo penguin (pygoscelis papua papua) pecks seal. South shetlands
1191-2 - Southern elephant seal. Mirounga leonina. Gentoo penguin (pygoscelis papua papua) pecks seal. South shetlands
Seal (mirounga leonina) pup, close-up of face, south georgia.
1198-146 - Seal (mirounga leonina) pup, close-up of face, south georgia.
Beach master, Male Elephant Seal, South Georgia patrolling the shore
1060-2 - Beach master, Male Elephant Seal, South Georgia patrolling the shore
Leopard seal, Antarctica
1072-65 - Leopard seal, Antarctica
Leopard seal, Antarctica
1072-56 - Leopard seal, Antarctica
Leopard seal, Antarctica
1072-57 - Leopard seal, Antarctica
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-384 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-380 - government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, tagged young male, critically endangered, dead bait fish given by local fishermen, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-387 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, tagged young male, critically endangered, dead bait fish given by local fishermen, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-385 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-381 - government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-386 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach asleep. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-374 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach asleep. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female in surf, head just above surface of water while watching young.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-345 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female in surf, head just above surface of water while watching young.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-347 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-356 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-359 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-364 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory on the beach . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-358 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory on the beach . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-366 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Bull Southern Elephant Seal, Mirounga leonina, South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean.
917-233 - Bull Southern Elephant Seal, Mirounga leonina, South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean.
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-370 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-367 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female lying on rocks, head up looking with surf coming in round her. Slow shutter speed used showing movement of surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-369 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female lying on rocks, head up looking with surf coming in round her. Slow shutter speed used showing movement of surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Atlantic grey seals hauled out on Traeth Godi'r Coch, Wales, UK
915-597 - Atlantic grey seals hauled out on Traeth Godi'r Coch, Wales, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female half body shot with flipper up on rock while surveying pup. Female has wet fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-348 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female half body shot with flipper up on rock while surveying pup. Female has wet fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is scratching pups head to induce feeding.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-352 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is scratching pups head to induce feeding.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female fighting bull to protect her pup. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-375 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female fighting bull to protect her pup. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-360 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-351 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf waves crashing over head. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-368 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf waves crashing over head. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of ScotlandGrey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-373 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of ScotlandGrey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-365 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-350 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed and mouth open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-346 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed and mouth open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-372 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with dry fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-353 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with dry fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory while still in the surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-355 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory while still in the surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus),close up of bull looking up framed by out of focus rocks and scratching face with fin.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-354 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus),close up of bull looking up framed by out of focus rocks and scratching face with fin.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up shot of pup feeding, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-361 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up shot of pup feeding, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-357 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-362 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-349 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) head and body picture of female with dry fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-371 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) head and body picture of female with dry fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression and a wave breaking over his head.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-363 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression and a wave breaking over his head.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3912 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4522 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4596 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4637 - Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9286 - Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years.  Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled  April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
979-8156 - Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years. Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9287 - Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4512 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4650 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4505 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) hauled out on ice floe in Kayak Cove on Brabant Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The leopard seal is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is second only to the Orca as apex predator, feeding on other seals as well as penguins and krill.
979-9262 - Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) hauled out on ice floe in Kayak Cove on Brabant Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The leopard seal is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is second only to the Orca as apex predator, feeding on other seals as well as penguins and krill.
Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-7485 - Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) pup on Weinke Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. The Weddell seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) pup (often called "weaners" once their mothers stop nursing them) on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9298 - Southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) pup (often called "weaners" once their mothers stop nursing them) on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4592 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
979-7428 - Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3924 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4507 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Lindblad Expeditions staff member Lisa Trotter next to a HUGE adult male leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) hauled out on the beach at Salisbury Plains in the Bay of Isles, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The leopard seal is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals.
979-9427 - Lindblad Expeditions staff member Lisa Trotter next to a HUGE adult male leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) hauled out on the beach at Salisbury Plains in the Bay of Isles, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The leopard seal is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore filming the Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), which is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release JS0209.
979-3925 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore filming the Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), which is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release JS0209.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4603 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Adult bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) swimming amongst the ice in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO Bearded seals are the primary food source for the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). It feeds primarily on clams, squid, and fish along the bottom.
979-8752 - Adult bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) swimming amongst the ice in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO Bearded seals are the primary food source for the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). It feeds primarily on clams, squid, and fish along the bottom.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4540 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years.  Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled  April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
979-8154 - Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years. Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4667 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4598 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) hauled out on ice floe near the Antarctic Peninsula. MORE INFO crabeater seals often exhibit spiral scarring on their bodies, most likely from attacks by leopard seals, or more rarely, killer whales. These seals also often have red stains around their mouths from eating krill.The crabeater seal, at a population of 15 to 75 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs, 98% of the crabeater seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. These seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year.
979-7465 - Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) hauled out on ice floe near the Antarctic Peninsula. MORE INFO crabeater seals often exhibit spiral scarring on their bodies, most likely from attacks by leopard seals, or more rarely, killer whales. These seals also often have red stains around their mouths from eating krill.The crabeater seal, at a population of 15 to 75 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs, 98% of the crabeater seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. These seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3934 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3927 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3918 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9279 - Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
979-7422 - Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) hauled out on ice floe near the Antarctic Peninsula. MORE INFO crabeater seals often exhibit spiral scarring on their bodies, most likely from attacks by leopard seals, or more rarely, killer whales. These seals also often have red stains around their mouths from eating krill.The crabeater seal, at a population of 15 to 75 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs, 98% of the crabeater seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. These seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year.
979-7467 - Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) hauled out on ice floe near the Antarctic Peninsula. MORE INFO crabeater seals often exhibit spiral scarring on their bodies, most likely from attacks by leopard seals, or more rarely, killer whales. These seals also often have red stains around their mouths from eating krill.The crabeater seal, at a population of 15 to 75 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs, 98% of the crabeater seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. These seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4644 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Views of Stromness Whaling Station at 5489'S 6841'W. This is a former whaling station on the northern coast of South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. Its historical significance is that it represents the destination of Ernest Shackleton's epic rescue journey in 1916. In 1907 a "floating factory" was erected in Stromness Harbour; the land station being built in 1912. Stromness operated as a whaling station from 1912 until 1931. In 1931 it was converted into a ship repair yard with a machine shop and a foundry. It remained operational until 1961 when the site was abandoned. In 1916, Ernest Shackleton and a small crew landed on the unpopulated southern coast of South Georgia at King Haakon Bay after an arduous sea voyage from Elephant Island in the 22-foot lifeboat James Caird. Shackleton along with Tom Crean and Frank Worsley then trekked across South Georgia's mountainous and glaciated interior in an effort to reach help on the populated northern shore of the island. After 36 hours of crossing the interior they arrived at the Stromness administration center which also was the home of the Norwegian whaling station's manager. All men were rescued from Elephant Island. In the decades following its closure, Stromness has been subject to damage from the elements and many of its buildings have been reduced to ruins. Outside of Stromness is a small whalers' cemetery with 14 grave markers.
979-4986 - Views of Stromness Whaling Station at 5489'S 6841'W. This is a former whaling station on the northern coast of South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. Its historical significance is that it represents the destination of Ernest Shackleton's epic rescue journey in 1916. In 1907 a "floating factory" was erected in Stromness Harbour; the land station being built in 1912. Stromness operated as a whaling station from 1912 until 1931. In 1931 it was converted into a ship repair yard with a machine shop and a foundry. It remained operational until 1961 when the site was abandoned. In 1916, Ernest Shackleton and a small crew landed on the unpopulated southern coast of South Georgia at King Haakon Bay after an arduous sea voyage from Elephant Island in the 22-foot lifeboat James Caird. Shackleton along with Tom Crean and Frank Worsley then trekked across South Georgia's mountainous and glaciated interior in an effort to reach help on the populated northern shore of the island. After 36 hours of crossing the interior they arrived at the Stromness administration center which also was the home of the Norwegian whaling station's manager. All men were rescued from Elephant Island. In the decades following its closure, Stromness has been subject to damage from the elements and many of its buildings have been reduced to ruins. Outside of Stromness is a small whalers' cemetery with 14 grave markers.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4635 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Curious harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) approaches the Zodiac at Vigur Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This seal is also known as the common seal or the harbour seal. With an estimated 400,000 to 500,000 individuals worldwide it is one of the most numerous seals in the world.
979-9024 - Curious harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) approaches the Zodiac at Vigur Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This seal is also known as the common seal or the harbour seal. With an estimated 400,000 to 500,000 individuals worldwide it is one of the most numerous seals in the world.
Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4648 - Young southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
979-3931 - National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore and his wife Kathy kayaking with a leopard seal near Danco Island, Antarctica. The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice. Model release for Joel and Kathy JS0209.
Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
979-7421 - Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
Young adult bull southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) holding a young pup's head underwater (seemingly trying to kill it- the pup survived) on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia. Bull elephant seals compete fiercely for breeding rights with females, sometimes serious injuries occur as a result.
979-9299 - Young adult bull southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) holding a young pup's head underwater (seemingly trying to kill it- the pup survived) on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia. Bull elephant seals compete fiercely for breeding rights with females, sometimes serious injuries occur as a result.
Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years.  Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled  April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
979-8155 - Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years. Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4500 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9283 - Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
979-7427 - Adult female leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) stalking, then killing and eating an adult gentoo penguin in Paradise Bay, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Although primarily a krill eater, this female leopard seal has perfected the technique of ambushing gentoo penguins returning to their nesting colony in Paradise Bay. In order to avoid eating penguin feathers she literally flings the dead penguin out of its own skin by violently thrashing the penguin side-to-side. In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented.
Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) hauled out and resting on the beach at low tide in Crab Bay on Chichagof Island, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The size of male harbor seals can reach about 1.4 to 2 meters in length with a mass of 70 to 170 kilograms. The size of female harbor seals can reach about 1.2 to 1.7 meters in length with a mass of 50 to 150 kilograms. The total Alaska harbor seal population probably ranges between 200,000 and 300,000 animals.
979-6791 - Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) hauled out and resting on the beach at low tide in Crab Bay on Chichagof Island, Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The size of male harbor seals can reach about 1.4 to 2 meters in length with a mass of 70 to 170 kilograms. The size of female harbor seals can reach about 1.2 to 1.7 meters in length with a mass of 50 to 150 kilograms. The total Alaska harbor seal population probably ranges between 200,000 and 300,000 animals.
Adult bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) swimming amongst the ice in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO Bearded seals are the primary food source for the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). It feeds primarily on clams, squid, and fish along the bottom.
979-8747 - Adult bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) swimming amongst the ice in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO Bearded seals are the primary food source for the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). It feeds primarily on clams, squid, and fish along the bottom.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4539 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4601 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) hauled out on ice floe near the Antarctic Peninsula. MORE INFO crabeater seals often exhibit spiral scarring on their bodies, most likely from attacks by leopard seals, or more rarely, killer whales. These seals also often have red stains around their mouths from eating krill.The crabeater seal, at a population of 15 to 75 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs, 98% of the crabeater seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. These seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year.
979-7470 - Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) hauled out on ice floe near the Antarctic Peninsula. MORE INFO crabeater seals often exhibit spiral scarring on their bodies, most likely from attacks by leopard seals, or more rarely, killer whales. These seals also often have red stains around their mouths from eating krill.The crabeater seal, at a population of 15 to 75 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs, 98% of the crabeater seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. These seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year.