Robert Harding

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1219-228 - Upper Derwent Valley with two Lancaster bombers passing the Derwent Dam in the style of 617 Squadron Dambusters, Peak District, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom, Europe
1116-39102 - Railway Track Along The 'selektionsrampe', The Platform Where People Where Selected To Die In The Gas Chambers Immediately Or To Work To Death At The Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp, Oswiecim, Malopolska, Poland
911-10750 - The Remains of the Godwin battery on the beach at Kilnsea at the head of Spurn point on Yorkshires East Coast, UK. Initially constructed during the First World War, the Godwin Battery was added to during the Second World War. It comprised of gun emplacements, search light, barracks, officers’ mess, and a hospital. This section of coastline is the fastest eroding coastline in Europe. The soft boulder clay cliffs are easily eroded and have been eroding since Roman Times, but recently the climate change impacts of increased stormy weather, increased heavy rainfall events and sea level rise have accelerated the rate of erosion. The average rate of attrition is 1.5metres per year, last year it was 5 metres.
911-10774 - Technicians work on Wymeswold Solar Farm the largest solar farm in the UK at 34 MWp, based on an old disused second world war airfield, Leicestershire, UK. It contains 130,000 panels and covers 150 acres.
911-10773 - Wymeswold Solar Farm the largest solar farm in the UK at 34 MWp, based on an old disused second world war airfield, Leicestershire, UK. It contains 130,000 panels and covers 150 acres.
911-10749 - The Remains of the Godwin battery on the beach at Kilnsea at the head of Spurn point on Yorkshires East Coast, UK. Initially constructed during the First World War, the Godwin Battery was added to during the Second World War. It comprised of gun emplacements, search light, barracks, officers’ mess, and a hospital. This section of coastline is the fastest eroding coastline in Europe. The soft boulder clay cliffs are easily eroded and have been eroding since Roman Times, but recently the climate change impacts of increased stormy weather, increased heavy rainfall events and sea level rise have accelerated the rate of erosion. The average rate of attrition is 1.5metres per year, last year it was 5 metres.
911-10772 - Wymeswold Solar Farm the largest solar farm in the UK at 34 MWp, based on an old disused second world war airfield, Leicestershire, UK. It contains 130,000 panels and covers 150 acres.
911-10486 - Second World war defences that for a long time were buried under the storm beach are revealed after the December 2013 storm surge at Cley on the North Norfolk coast, UK. The huge waves completely breached the storm beach, and pushed it inland onto the Cley nature reserve.
911-10608 - Traditional hay meadows at the head of the Langdale valley, Lake District, UK, are some of the best wild flower hay meadows left in the country. Since the second world war, Britian has lost over 95% of its traditional hay meadows, as farmers have converted to silage.
911-10074 - A Second world War lookout post leaning alarmingly and about to tumble over the edge of the cliff near Aldbrough on Yorkshires East Coast, UK. The coast is composed of soft boulder clays, very vulnerable to coastal erosion. This section of coast has been eroding since Roman times, with many villages having disappeared into the sea, and is the fastest eroding coast in Europe. Climate change is speeding up the erosion, with sea level rise, increased stormy weather and increased heavy rainfall events, all playing their part.
817-472120 - School of Bigeye Trevally (Caranx sexfasciatus) forming tornadoat USAT Liberty ship (US Army transport ship torpedoed by Japanese in WWII) at Tulamben in Bali in Indonesia.
817-472121 - School of Bigeye Trevally (Caranx sexfasciatus) forming tornadoat USAT Liberty ship (US Army transport ship torpedoed by Japanese in WWII) at Tulamben in Bali in Indonesia.
817-455472 - Shoo Shoo Baby is the name of a B-17 Flying Fortress in World War II, preserved and on public display. A B-17G-35-BO, serial number 42-32076, and manufactured by Boeing, it was named by her crew for a song of the same name made popular by The Andrews Sisters, the favorite song of its crew chief T/Sgt. Hank Cordes. Photographs of the bomber indicate that a third 'Shoo' was added to the name at some point in May 1944 when the original aircraft commander completed his tour of duty and was replaced by another pilot.