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A sign telling hikers to stay on the trail in Haleakala crater. Hiking off-trail leads to significant soil erosion in the delicate volcanic soils, Maui, Hawaii, United States of America
857-86673 - A sign telling hikers to stay on the trail in Haleakala crater. Hiking off-trail leads to significant soil erosion in the delicate volcanic soils, Maui, Hawaii, United States of America
View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465338 - View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Yellow Evangelische Stadtkirche Catholic Church Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
817-465354 - Yellow Evangelische Stadtkirche Catholic Church Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
Watermarks from Main River Flooding Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
817-465346 - Watermarks from Main River Flooding Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465337 - View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465329 - Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Cemetery Dracula Burial Place Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland Bavaria.
817-465343 - Cemetery Dracula Burial Place Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland Bavaria.
Crooked Tower Deutsches Fastnacht Museum Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland.
817-465342 - Crooked Tower Deutsches Fastnacht Museum Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland.
Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465335 - Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Church of our Lady Nuremberg Frauenkirche Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465324 - Church of our Lady Nuremberg Frauenkirche Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465330 - Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465339 - View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Main River Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
817-465357 - Main River Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
Eyelid Windows on Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465333 - Eyelid Windows on Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Bicycle Rentals Nuremberg Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465321 - Bicycle Rentals Nuremberg Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Bridge Across Main River Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
817-465358 - Bridge Across Main River Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
Cemetery Dracula Burial Place Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland Bavaria.
817-465344 - Cemetery Dracula Burial Place Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland Bavaria.
Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465334 - Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465331 - Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Church of our Lady Nuremberg Frauenkirche Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465323 - Church of our Lady Nuremberg Frauenkirche Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Street with shops Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
817-465351 - Street with shops Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465326 - Nuremberg Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Cemetery Dracula Burial Place Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland Bavaria.
817-465345 - Cemetery Dracula Burial Place Kitzingen Germany DE Deutschland Bavaria.
View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465336 - View of Nuremberg from Castle Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Yellow Clock Tower Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
817-465355 - Yellow Clock Tower Kitzingen Germany Bavaria Deutschland DE Bavaria.
Zeppelin Field Nuremberg Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
817-465340 - Zeppelin Field Nuremberg Nurnberg Germany Deutschland DE.
Sprudelhof, a significant building of the Art Nouveau architecture style, Bad Nauheim, Hesse, Germany, Europe
832-321168 - Sprudelhof, a significant building of the Art Nouveau architecture style, Bad Nauheim, Hesse, Germany, Europe
Padrao dos Descobrimentos, monument to discoverers, sculpture with significant figures of Portuguese seafaring at the riverside of Tejo, Belem, Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
832-261206 - Padrao dos Descobrimentos, monument to discoverers, sculpture with significant figures of Portuguese seafaring at the riverside of Tejo, Belem, Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Confederate Monument Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412910 - Confederate Monument Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415213 - Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
The Galloway House Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412903 - The Galloway House Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415208 - Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
Old Capitol Building Museum Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412912 - Old Capitol Building Museum Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415210 - Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
James Lee House Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415214 - James Lee House Memphis Tennessee TN
The Galloway House Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412904 - The Galloway House Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Medgar Evers Home Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412920 - Medgar Evers Home Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
The Galloway House Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412905 - The Galloway House Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415212 - Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
Medgar Evers Statue Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412919 - Medgar Evers Statue Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Old Capitol Building Museum Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412911 - Old Capitol Building Museum Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Old Capitol Building Museum Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
817-412913 - Old Capitol Building Museum Jackson, Mississippi, United States of America
Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415211 - Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415209 - Woodruff-Fontaine Historic House Museum Memphis Tennessee TN
Temple of Apollo in the ancient city of Didyma, significant sanctuary and Oracle, Turkey
1113-62895 - Temple of Apollo in the ancient city of Didyma, significant sanctuary and Oracle, Turkey
Temple of Apollo in the ancient city of Didyma, significant sanctuary and Oracle, Turkey
1113-62893 - Temple of Apollo in the ancient city of Didyma, significant sanctuary and Oracle, Turkey
Casino La Clede Landing Restored Neighborhood St  Louis MO Missouri
817-409759 - Casino La Clede Landing Restored Neighborhood St Louis MO Missouri
Dred and Harriet Scott Statue St  Louis MO Missouri Decision
817-409768 - Dred and Harriet Scott Statue St Louis MO Missouri Decision
La Clede Landing Restored Neighborhood Party St  Louis MO Missouri
817-409757 - La Clede Landing Restored Neighborhood Party St Louis MO Missouri
La Clede Landing Neighborhood St  Louis MO Missouri
817-409756 - La Clede Landing Neighborhood St Louis MO Missouri
Hot Sauces Displayed La Clede Landing Restored Neighboorhood St  Louis MO Missouri
817-409760 - Hot Sauces Displayed La Clede Landing Restored Neighboorhood St Louis MO Missouri
La Clede Landing Restored Neighborhood St  Louis MO Missouri
817-409758 - La Clede Landing Restored Neighborhood St Louis MO Missouri
Reeder´s Alley Helena Montana MT US
817-387012 - Reeder´s Alley Helena Montana MT US
Reeder´s Alley Helena Montana MT US
817-387014 - Reeder´s Alley Helena Montana MT US
Historic Morris Silverman House Helena Montana MT US
817-387009 - Historic Morris Silverman House Helena Montana MT US
Badlands National Park South Dakota
817-379540 - Badlands National Park South Dakota
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8691 - Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5389 - A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5385 - A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-3816 - Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8586 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Antarctic fur seal pup (Arctocephalus gazella) mock-fighting on South Georgia, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia, but this species is slowly returning to the Antarctic Peninsula after being hunted to extinction in much of its former range. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be as many as four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-9213 - Antarctic fur seal pup (Arctocephalus gazella) mock-fighting on South Georgia, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia, but this species is slowly returning to the Antarctic Peninsula after being hunted to extinction in much of its former range. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be as many as four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub hunting, Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8620 - Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub hunting, Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5386 - A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A young polar bear (Ursus maritimus), probably recently weaned from its mother, scavenging a polar bear carcass on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5369 - A young polar bear (Ursus maritimus), probably recently weaned from its mother, scavenging a polar bear carcass on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adults and cub hunting, Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8625 - Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adults and cub hunting, Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8602 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Views of the Drake Passage, the body of water between the southern tip of South America at Cape Horn, Chile and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica. It connects the southwestern part of the Atlantic Ocean (Scotia Sea) with the southeastern part of the Pacific Ocean and extends into the Southern Ocean. The passage is named after the 16th century English privateer Sir Francis Drake, whose only remaining ship after passing through the Strait of Magellan was blown far South in September 1578 and who inferred an open connection of the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. Half a century earlier, after a gale had pushed them South from the entrance of the Strait of Magellan, the crew of the Spanish navigator Francisco de Hoces thought they saw a land's end and possibly inferred this passage in 1525. For this reason, some Spanish and Latin American historians and sources call it Mar de Hoces after Francisco de Hoces. The first recorded voyage through the passage was that of the Eendracht, captained by the Dutch navigator Willem Schouten in 1616, naming Cape Horn in the process. The 800 km (500 miles) wide passage between Cape Horn and Greenwich Island is the shortest crossing from Antarctica to the rest of the world's land. The boundary between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is sometimes taken to be a line drawn from Cape Horn to Snow Island (130 km (80 miles) north of mainland Antarctica). Alternatively the meridian that passes through Cape Horn may be taken as the boundary. Both boundaries lie entirely within the Drake Passage. There is no significant land anywhere around the world at the latitudes of the Drake Passage, which is important to the unimpeded flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current which carries a huge volume of water (about 600 times the flow of the Amazon River) through the Passage and around Antarctica.
979-4395 - Views of the Drake Passage, the body of water between the southern tip of South America at Cape Horn, Chile and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica. It connects the southwestern part of the Atlantic Ocean (Scotia Sea) with the southeastern part of the Pacific Ocean and extends into the Southern Ocean. The passage is named after the 16th century English privateer Sir Francis Drake, whose only remaining ship after passing through the Strait of Magellan was blown far South in September 1578 and who inferred an open connection of the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. Half a century earlier, after a gale had pushed them South from the entrance of the Strait of Magellan, the crew of the Spanish navigator Francisco de Hoces thought they saw a land's end and possibly inferred this passage in 1525. For this reason, some Spanish and Latin American historians and sources call it Mar de Hoces after Francisco de Hoces. The first recorded voyage through the passage was that of the Eendracht, captained by the Dutch navigator Willem Schouten in 1616, naming Cape Horn in the process. The 800 km (500 miles) wide passage between Cape Horn and Greenwich Island is the shortest crossing from Antarctica to the rest of the world's land. The boundary between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is sometimes taken to be a line drawn from Cape Horn to Snow Island (130 km (80 miles) north of mainland Antarctica). Alternatively the meridian that passes through Cape Horn may be taken as the boundary. Both boundaries lie entirely within the Drake Passage. There is no significant land anywhere around the world at the latitudes of the Drake Passage, which is important to the unimpeded flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current which carries a huge volume of water (about 600 times the flow of the Amazon River) through the Passage and around Antarctica.
A curious young polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in Woodfjorden on the northern coast of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8581 - A curious young polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in Woodfjorden on the northern coast of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8616 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with two coy (cubs-of-year) on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern side of Heleysundet in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5350 - Mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with two coy (cubs-of-year) on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern side of Heleysundet in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A pair of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes (these two are probably recently weaned siblings) in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5339 - A pair of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes (these two are probably recently weaned siblings) in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pups at play at the abandoned Norwegian whaling station at Stromness on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-3801 - Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pups at play at the abandoned Norwegian whaling station at Stromness on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
Adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) resting on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5337 - Adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) resting on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pups at play at the abandoned Norwegian whaling station at Stromness on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-3793 - Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pups at play at the abandoned Norwegian whaling station at Stromness on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
Adult male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8675 - Adult male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8635 - Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Adult male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8676 - Adult male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8615 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) feeding side-by-side on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5393 - A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8636 - Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Antarctic fur seal pup (Arctocephalus gazella) in the kelp on South Georgia, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia, but this species is slowly returning to the Antarctic Peninsula after being hunted to extinction in much of its former range. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be as many as four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-9086 - Antarctic fur seal pup (Arctocephalus gazella) in the kelp on South Georgia, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia, but this species is slowly returning to the Antarctic Peninsula after being hunted to extinction in much of its former range. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be as many as four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8606 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a single coy (cub-of-year) on first year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Bölscheöya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5366 - A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a single coy (cub-of-year) on first year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Bölscheöya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A pair of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes (these two are probably recently weaned siblings) in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5338 - A pair of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes (these two are probably recently weaned siblings) in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8597 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8661 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A pair of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes (these two are probably recently weaned siblings) in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge›ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8195 - A pair of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) on multi-year ice floes (these two are probably recently weaned siblings) in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge›ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO An adult male weighs around 400-680 kg (880-1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8613 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) adult on snow, Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8643 - Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) adult on snow, Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) adult with seal kill. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8642 - Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) adult with seal kill. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8587 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8599 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging  a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8595 - A younger polar bear (Ursus maritimus) scavenging a fresh bearded seal kill recently vacated by the old male that killed the seal near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8591 - A well-scarred old male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pup on Prion Island in the Bay of Isles on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-3786 - Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pup on Prion Island in the Bay of Isles on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pups at play at the abandoned Norwegian whaling station at Stromness on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-3807 - Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) pups at play at the abandoned Norwegian whaling station at Stromness on the island of South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a single coy (cub-of-year) on first year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Bˆlscheˆya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5363 - A mother polar bear (Ursus maritimus) with a single coy (cub-of-year) on first year ice floes in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Bˆlscheˆya Island in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. An adult male weighs around 400?680 kg (880?1,500 lb) while an adult female is about half that size. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8609 - Two young polar bears (Ursus maritimus) disputing feeding rights on a fresh bearded seal kill near Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) porpoising near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.
979-7064 - Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) porpoising near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. The Antarctic Fur Seal is one of eight seals in the genus Arctocephalus, and one of the nine fur seals in the family Arctocephalinae. As its name suggests, the Antarctic Fur Seal is distributed in Antarctic waters. Around 95% of the world population breeds at the Island of South Georgia. It is named for the German naval vessel the SMS Gazelle which collected the first specimen from Kerguelen Island. The species is also known as the Kerguelen Fur Seal. Males are substantially larger than females. Antarctic fur seals grow 2 m (6.5 ft) long and weigh 91 kg (200 lb) to 209 kg (460 lb). Males live for about 15 years and females up to 25. The usual food supply is krill, and each Antarctic Fur seal eats about a ton of krill each year. Due to the enormous and growing populations of these seals, their food is a significant proportion of South Georgia's krill stocks. There may be approximately two to four million individuals breeding at South Georgia. The concentrations at South Georgia are the densest aggregations of marine mammals on earth. Some researchers believe these populations have grown to such levels because the removal of whales by the intensive whaling of the 20th century left a surplus of krill.