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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
860-287796 - Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
860-287793 - Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
860-287797 - Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
Scuba diver with big Gulf grouper (Mycteroperca jordani), Cabo Pulmo Marine National Park, Baja California Sur, Mexico
860-287966 - Scuba diver with big Gulf grouper (Mycteroperca jordani), Cabo Pulmo Marine National Park, Baja California Sur, Mexico
Musk Ox (Ovibos moschatus), bulls in snowstorm, winter, Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella-Nationalpark, Norway
860-288251 - Musk Ox (Ovibos moschatus), bulls in snowstorm, winter, Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella-Nationalpark, Norway
Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
860-287792 - Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
860-287795 - Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production
Honey bees on a hive frame
860-287791 - Honey bees on a hive frame
Protection of Arctic Terns, experimental device against gulls, Isle of May, Scotland
860-287550 - Protection of Arctic Terns, experimental device against gulls, Isle of May, Scotland
This species of coral hermit crab (Paguritta sp) is well known, but still awaiting a name from biologists. It lives in a hole in hard coral and traps passing plankton in it's feathery antennae, Yap, Micronesia
1116-39732 - This species of coral hermit crab (Paguritta sp) is well known, but still awaiting a name from biologists. It lives in a hole in hard coral and traps passing plankton in it's feathery antennae, Yap, Micronesia
Diver and school of young bluefin tuna, Azores
860-282371 - Diver and school of young bluefin tuna, Azores
Young orangutan walking on ground, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285707 - Young orangutan walking on ground, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285706 - Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Young orangutan near its nest, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285701 - Young orangutan near its nest, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Young orangutan hanging, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285699 - Young orangutan hanging, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Proboscis Monkey eating, Labuk Bay Sabah Borneo Malaysia
860-285687 - Proboscis Monkey eating, Labuk Bay Sabah Borneo Malaysia
Borneo orangutan hanging on a rope, Malaysia
860-284540 - Borneo orangutan hanging on a rope, Malaysia
Young Blanding's turtle three-quarter sht
860-286105 - Young Blanding's turtle three-quarter sht
Red-and-green Macaws on a branch, Sepilok Malaysia
860-285716 - Red-and-green Macaws on a branch, Sepilok Malaysia
Young Orang-Utans on Platform, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285709 - Young Orang-Utans on Platform, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Banding Firecrest captured by net, France
860-285137 - Banding Firecrest captured by net, France
Young orangutan near its nest, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285703 - Young orangutan near its nest, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Round Stingray and Diver, Azores Atlantic Ocean
860-282947 - Round Stingray and Diver, Azores Atlantic Ocean
Young Yellow-margined Box Turtle three-quarter sht
860-286104 - Young Yellow-margined Box Turtle three-quarter sht
Great Hammerhead Shark and divers on sandy bottom, Bahamas
860-282370 - Great Hammerhead Shark and divers on sandy bottom, Bahamas
Rapace on glove Falconer, Burgos Spain
860-284399 - Rapace on glove Falconer, Burgos Spain
Portrait of male Red-crested Pochard, France
860-283011 - Portrait of male Red-crested Pochard, France
Borneo orangutan hanging from a brance, Malaysia
860-284538 - Borneo orangutan hanging from a brance, Malaysia
Falconer and raptor in flight, Burgos Spain
860-284397 - Falconer and raptor in flight, Burgos Spain
Portrait of young Diamondback Terrapin profile shot
860-286103 - Portrait of young Diamondback Terrapin profile shot
Young Chinese Three-striped Box Turtle profil shot
860-286098 - Young Chinese Three-striped Box Turtle profil shot
Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285702 - Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285705 - Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Portrait of young Diamondback Terrapin profile shot
860-286102 - Portrait of young Diamondback Terrapin profile shot
Young orangutan hanging, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285698 - Young orangutan hanging, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285704 - Portrait of young orangutan, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Banding Firecrest captured by net, France
860-285139 - Banding Firecrest captured by net, France
Eurasian Eagle-owl in flight and falconer, Cantabria Spain
860-284167 - Eurasian Eagle-owl in flight and falconer, Cantabria Spain
Young orangutan hanging, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
860-285700 - Young orangutan hanging, Sepilok Borneo Malaysia
Northern Goshawk in flight and falconer, Cantabria Spain
860-284168 - Northern Goshawk in flight and falconer, Cantabria Spain
Portrait of young Gabon Mud Turtle
860-286099 - Portrait of young Gabon Mud Turtle
Great Hammerhead Shark and divers on sandy bottom, Bahamas
860-282372 - Great Hammerhead Shark and divers on sandy bottom, Bahamas
Eurasian Sparrowhawk on falconer glove, Burgos Spain
860-284395 - Eurasian Sparrowhawk on falconer glove, Burgos Spain
Sunshades on Gulangyu Island, Xiamen, also known as Amoy, Fujian province, China, Asia
832-77589 - Sunshades on Gulangyu Island, Xiamen, also known as Amoy, Fujian province, China, Asia
Australia, Mother and joey, Easter Great Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).
1116-35883 - Australia, Mother and joey, Easter Great Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).
[DC] Indonesia, Fiddler crab (Uca) in mangrove forest.
1116-34658 - [DC] Indonesia, Fiddler crab (Uca) in mangrove forest.
Hawaii, Bright orange anemone fish swimming with new baby near bright blue green coral reef.
1116-31060 - Hawaii, Bright orange anemone fish swimming with new baby near bright blue green coral reef.
Portrait male Proboscis monkey in the tree in mangrove forest Bako National Park Sarawak Borneo Malaysia
832-19565 - Portrait male Proboscis monkey in the tree in mangrove forest Bako National Park Sarawak Borneo Malaysia
Male Proboscis monkey sits in mangrove forest Bako National Park Sarawak Borneo Malaysia
832-19564 - Male Proboscis monkey sits in mangrove forest Bako National Park Sarawak Borneo Malaysia
Leopard and tiger skins, india. Confiscated leopard and tiger skins with conservator
1193-33 - Leopard and tiger skins, india. Confiscated leopard and tiger skins with conservator
A small pod of Type B killer whales (Orcinus nanus) just outside Duse Bay in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO These animals are also often called killer whales, but this is a misnomer as this is actually the largest member of the dolphin family. The Type B killer whale is a proposed new species called Orcinus nanus, though this is not universally accepted in the scientific community yet. Type B killer whales specialize in hunting pinnipeds, although they have been documented taking penguins. The Antarctic population estimate is 70,000-80,000 for all types of killer whales.
979-9311 - A small pod of Type B killer whales (Orcinus nanus) just outside Duse Bay in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO These animals are also often called killer whales, but this is a misnomer as this is actually the largest member of the dolphin family. The Type B killer whale is a proposed new species called Orcinus nanus, though this is not universally accepted in the scientific community yet. Type B killer whales specialize in hunting pinnipeds, although they have been documented taking penguins. The Antarctic population estimate is 70,000-80,000 for all types of killer whales.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4338 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-6971 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4336 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-6970 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-9130 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-4913 - Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in huge surf at Point Wild on Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands, near the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-7078 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in huge surf at Point Wild on Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands, near the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-6969 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4340 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
King Penguin colony (Aptenodytes patagonicus) guarding against a Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes gigantes) on South Georgia Island, southern Atlantic Ocean.
979-1429 - King Penguin colony (Aptenodytes patagonicus) guarding against a Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes gigantes) on South Georgia Island, southern Atlantic Ocean.
A large pod of 25 to 45 Type B killer whales (Orcinus nanus) in Paradise Bay at 648 48.6?S  638 02.6?W, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO These animals are also often called killer whales, but this is a misnomer as this is actually the largest member of the dolphin family. The Type B killer whale is a proposed new species called Orcinus nanus, though this is not universally accepted in the scientific community yet. Type B killer whales specialize in hunting pinnipeds, although this group was documented taking at least 1 gentoo penguin. The Antarctic population estimate is 70,000?80,000 for all types of killer whales.
979-7939 - A large pod of 25 to 45 Type B killer whales (Orcinus nanus) in Paradise Bay at 648 48.6?S 638 02.6?W, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO These animals are also often called killer whales, but this is a misnomer as this is actually the largest member of the dolphin family. The Type B killer whale is a proposed new species called Orcinus nanus, though this is not universally accepted in the scientific community yet. Type B killer whales specialize in hunting pinnipeds, although this group was documented taking at least 1 gentoo penguin. The Antarctic population estimate is 70,000?80,000 for all types of killer whales.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-6991 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-9133 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-9129 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) with chick in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-7158 - Adult Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) with chick in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-9128 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-9132 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
South American Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens) hauled out on small rocky islet just outside Ushuaia, Argentina in the Beagle Channel. The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well developed mane making them the most lionesque of the eared seals.Males are much larger and heavier than females, reaching a length of over 2.8 meters and 350 kg while the females reach 2.2 meters and 144 kg. South American sea lions were greatly hunted in the 19th and 20th centuries. The hunting has since gone down and the species is no longer threatened and is protected in most of its range. The population estimate is 265,000 animals. They are increasing in Argentina and Chile but are declining in the Falkland Islands and Uruguay. They still are killed due the sea lions' habits of stealing fish and damaging fishing nets.
979-7114 - South American Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens) hauled out on small rocky islet just outside Ushuaia, Argentina in the Beagle Channel. The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well developed mane making them the most lionesque of the eared seals.Males are much larger and heavier than females, reaching a length of over 2.8 meters and 350 kg while the females reach 2.2 meters and 144 kg. South American sea lions were greatly hunted in the 19th and 20th centuries. The hunting has since gone down and the species is no longer threatened and is protected in most of its range. The population estimate is 265,000 animals. They are increasing in Argentina and Chile but are declining in the Falkland Islands and Uruguay. They still are killed due the sea lions' habits of stealing fish and damaging fishing nets.
Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) parent and chick on Barren Island in the Falkland Islands, South Atlantic Ocean. The giant petrels are two large seabirds from the genus Macronectes. Long considered to be conspecific (they were not established as separate species until 1966), the two species, the Southern Giant Petrel (M. giganteus) and Northern Giant Petrel (M. halli) are the largest members of the petrel family, Procellariidae, and considered, with the two fulmars to form a distinct sub-group within the petrels. Both species are restricted to the southern hemisphere, and though the ranges overlap greatly, notably in South Georgia, the Southern Giant Petrel nests further south, with colonies on Antarctica. Giant petrels are aggressive predators and scavengers, which has led to the other common name they were known as, the Stinker, and the whalers used to call them gluttons. The Southern Giant Petrel is slightly larger at 3.8-8 kg (8.4-17.6 lbs), 180-210 cm (71-83 in) across the wings and 86-100 cm (33-40 in). They superficially resemble the albatross, and are the only procellarids who can equal them in size.
979-4620 - Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) parent and chick on Barren Island in the Falkland Islands, South Atlantic Ocean. The giant petrels are two large seabirds from the genus Macronectes. Long considered to be conspecific (they were not established as separate species until 1966), the two species, the Southern Giant Petrel (M. giganteus) and Northern Giant Petrel (M. halli) are the largest members of the petrel family, Procellariidae, and considered, with the two fulmars to form a distinct sub-group within the petrels. Both species are restricted to the southern hemisphere, and though the ranges overlap greatly, notably in South Georgia, the Southern Giant Petrel nests further south, with colonies on Antarctica. Giant petrels are aggressive predators and scavengers, which has led to the other common name they were known as, the Stinker, and the whalers used to call them gluttons. The Southern Giant Petrel is slightly larger at 3.8-8 kg (8.4-17.6 lbs), 180-210 cm (71-83 in) across the wings and 86-100 cm (33-40 in). They superficially resemble the albatross, and are the only procellarids who can equal them in size.
Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) adults with chicks in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-7155 - Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) adults with chicks in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4339 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4337 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
South American Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens) hauled out on small rocky islet just outside Ushuaia, Argentina in the Beagle Channel. The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well developed mane making them the most lionesque of the eared seals.Males are much larger and heavier than females, reaching a length of over 2.8 meters and 350 kg while the females reach 2.2 meters and 144 kg. South American sea lions were greatly hunted in the 19th and 20th centuries. The hunting has since gone down and the species is no longer threatened and is protected in most of its range. The population estimate is 265,000 animals. They are increasing in Argentina and Chile but are declining in the Falkland Islands and Uruguay. They still are killed due the sea lions' habits of stealing fish and damaging fishing nets.
979-7115 - South American Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens) hauled out on small rocky islet just outside Ushuaia, Argentina in the Beagle Channel. The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well developed mane making them the most lionesque of the eared seals.Males are much larger and heavier than females, reaching a length of over 2.8 meters and 350 kg while the females reach 2.2 meters and 144 kg. South American sea lions were greatly hunted in the 19th and 20th centuries. The hunting has since gone down and the species is no longer threatened and is protected in most of its range. The population estimate is 265,000 animals. They are increasing in Argentina and Chile but are declining in the Falkland Islands and Uruguay. They still are killed due the sea lions' habits of stealing fish and damaging fishing nets.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-9131 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-6993 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
979-6992 - Adult sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) mother and pup in Inian Pass, Southeastern Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO: This sub-species ranges from the Aleutian Islands throughout southeast Alaska to Oregon. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (30 to 100 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals.
Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) adults with chicks in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-7156 - Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) adults with chicks in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Gentoo penguin adult (Pygoscelis papua) on hatching egg in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
979-7159 - Gentoo penguin adult (Pygoscelis papua) on hatching egg in Antarctica. The Gentoo Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. It is the third largest of all penguins worldwide, with adult Gentoos reach a height of 51 to 90 cm (20-36 in).There are an estimated 80,000 breeding gentoo penguin pairs in the Antarctic peninsula area with a total population estimate of around 314,000 breeding pairs in all of Antarctica. Males have a maximum weight of about 8.5 kg (18.8 lbs) just before moulting, and a minimum weight of about 4.9 kg (10.8 lbs) just before mating. For females the maximum weight is 8.2 kg (18 lbs) just before moulting, but their weight drops to as little as 4.5 kg (10 lbs) when guarding the chicks in the nest. Birds from the north are on average 700 g (1.5 lbs) and 10 cm (4 in) taller than southern birds. They are the fastest underwater swimming penguins, reaching speeds of 36 km/h. Gentoo Penguins are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
Female Orang utan (Pongo pygmaeus abelli)and her baby,captive, red list of endangered species
817-184103 - Female Orang utan (Pongo pygmaeus abelli)and her baby,captive, red list of endangered species
Female Orang utan (Pongo pygmaeus) carrying baby, captive, red list of endangered species
817-184104 - Female Orang utan (Pongo pygmaeus) carrying baby, captive, red list of endangered species
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