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Oil Booms Attached to a Barge, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
1174-5492 - Oil Booms Attached to a Barge, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
November 7, 2008 Mt Shasta CA A spawned-out Chinook salmon watches over her redd in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 2 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water tempt by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC, therefor TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is successful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitat and quickly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. In California, The Nature Conservancy is focusing its efforts on protecting the Shasta River and its tributaries, which create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
857-91073 - November 7, 2008 Mt Shasta CA A spawned-out Chinook salmon watches over her redd in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 2 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water tempt by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC, therefor TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is successful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitat and quickly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. In California, The Nature Conservancy is focusing its efforts on protecting the Shasta River and its tributaries, which create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
November 12, 2008 Mt Shasta and the Shasta River, Big Springs ranch, CA Carson Jeffres Staff Research Associate for UC Davis Center for watershed Sciences, conducting research in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin. The ranch is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth River.This stretch of river is a very fertile juvenile salmon rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle and bad irrigation practices, United States of America
857-91078 - November 12, 2008 Mt Shasta and the Shasta River, Big Springs ranch, CA Carson Jeffres Staff Research Associate for UC Davis Center for watershed Sciences, conducting research in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin. The ranch is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth River.This stretch of river is a very fertile juvenile salmon rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle and bad irrigation practices, United States of America
November 12, 2008 Mt Shasta CA, Big Springs ranch Carson Jeffres (rt) Staff Research Associate for UC Davis Center for watershed Sciences, and Andrew Nichols, Jr Specialist (UC Davis Center for watershed Sciences,) conducting research in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions that warm water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC, therefor TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degrated by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is sucessful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitiat and qucikly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitiat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
857-91077 - November 12, 2008 Mt Shasta CA, Big Springs ranch Carson Jeffres (rt) Staff Research Associate for UC Davis Center for watershed Sciences, and Andrew Nichols, Jr Specialist (UC Davis Center for watershed Sciences,) conducting research in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions that warm water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC, therefor TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degrated by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is sucessful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitiat and qucikly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitiat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
November 12, 2008 Mt Shasta CA, Big Springs ranch The Shasta River as it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin. The ranch is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth River.This stretch of river is a very fertile juvenile salmon rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle and bad irrigation practices, United States of America
857-91080 - November 12, 2008 Mt Shasta CA, Big Springs ranch The Shasta River as it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin. The ranch is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth River.This stretch of river is a very fertile juvenile salmon rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle and bad irrigation practices, United States of America
Mt Shasta CA, Big Spring Ranch Bill Chesney from the CA Dept of Fish & Game counting redds in a stretch of river that is heavily grazed by cattle who have full access to the river and often drink and eat in it. Mt Shasta in the background. The Shasta River runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, and actually warming water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC. Since the contract began, TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degradation by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is successful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitat and quickly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
857-91084 - Mt Shasta CA, Big Spring Ranch Bill Chesney from the CA Dept of Fish & Game counting redds in a stretch of river that is heavily grazed by cattle who have full access to the river and often drink and eat in it. Mt Shasta in the background. The Shasta River runs through Big Springs Ranch about 20 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, and actually warming water temps by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC. Since the contract began, TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degradation by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is successful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitat and quickly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. The Shasta River and its tributaries create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
November 7, 2008 Mt Shasta CA A spawned-out Chinook salmon watches over her redd in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 2 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water tempt by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC, therefor TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is successful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitat and quickly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. In California, The Nature Conservancy is focusing its efforts on protecting the Shasta River and its tributaries, which create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
857-91074 - November 7, 2008 Mt Shasta CA A spawned-out Chinook salmon watches over her redd in the Shasta River where it runs through Big Springs Ranch about 2 miles north of the town of Mt Shasta. The ranch, which is contributing to degraded habitat conditions, which actually warm water tempt by upwards of 10 degrees as the river passes through the ranch and then spills into the Klameth, is currently under contract for purchase by TNC, therefor TNC and partner organizations have been allowed to research this stretch of river for the first time. They have discovered that is it a very fertile juvenile rearing area and that there are a surprising number of returning salmon in spite of habitat degraded by grazing cattle (often in the river) and irrigation practices. If this purchase is successful, TNC has the chance to improve a large stretch of habitat and quickly improve conditions that will effect numbers of returning fish and habitat in the Shasta and Klameth Rivers. In California, The Nature Conservancy is focusing its efforts on protecting the Shasta River and its tributaries, which create one of the most important spawning nurseries for Chinook salmon in the entire Klamath Basin, United States of America
Oil spill on asphalt
1178-16308 - Oil spill on asphalt
Waiter spilling wine on customer
1178-22286 - Waiter spilling wine on customer
Raw sewage emptying directly onto the beach from a sewage pipe coming from a caravan park in Kilnsea, Spurn Point, Yorkshire, UK.
911-10751 - Raw sewage emptying directly onto the beach from a sewage pipe coming from a caravan park in Kilnsea, Spurn Point, Yorkshire, UK.
Contaminated water being emptied out of Finland Docks in Hull, directly into the Humber Estuary, Yorkshire, UK.  As they released the pollution, there was an awful chemical stench in the air.
911-10245 - Contaminated water being emptied out of Finland Docks in Hull, directly into the Humber Estuary, Yorkshire, UK. As they released the pollution, there was an awful chemical stench in the air.
Workers place containment boom on the Kalamazoo River to contain an oil spill during which 800, 000 gallons of oil spilled from an Enbridge Energy Partners pipeline, Battle Creek, Michigan, USA
832-374655 - Workers place containment boom on the Kalamazoo River to contain an oil spill during which 800, 000 gallons of oil spilled from an Enbridge Energy Partners pipeline, Battle Creek, Michigan, USA
During a training session for workers dealing with toxic chemical spills, participants in protective suits walk down the street, Detroit, Michigan, USA
832-270486 - During a training session for workers dealing with toxic chemical spills, participants in protective suits walk down the street, Detroit, Michigan, USA
A training session for workers dealing with toxic chemical spills, Detroit, Michigan, USA
832-270487 - A training session for workers dealing with toxic chemical spills, Detroit, Michigan, USA
Lava flowing over cliff into water
817-439152 - Lava flowing over cliff into water
Haulpak truck, Hamersley iron ore mine, Tom Price, Pilbara, Western Australia, Australia
832-169361 - Haulpak truck, Hamersley iron ore mine, Tom Price, Pilbara, Western Australia, Australia
Haulpak dump truck, working with iron ore, Hamersley iron ore mine, Tom Price, Pilbara, Western Australia, Australia
832-169358 - Haulpak dump truck, working with iron ore, Hamersley iron ore mine, Tom Price, Pilbara, Western Australia, Australia
Ninth relief, Stations of the Cross to Dusenbach monastery, Jesus falling for a third time under the weight of the cross, Ribeauville, Alsace, France, Europe
832-149481 - Ninth relief, Stations of the Cross to Dusenbach monastery, Jesus falling for a third time under the weight of the cross, Ribeauville, Alsace, France, Europe
Excavator shovel, laden with soil, construction site
832-145302 - Excavator shovel, laden with soil, construction site
Waterfall, Dark View Falls, Saint Vincent, Caribbean
832-130932 - Waterfall, Dark View Falls, Saint Vincent, Caribbean
Warnign sign, warning of undertow and falling off the platform, Germany, Europe
832-50379 - Warnign sign, warning of undertow and falling off the platform, Germany, Europe
A fisherman straightens nets on the docks of Joshua's Marina in Buras, Louisiana.
857-56310 - A fisherman straightens nets on the docks of Joshua's Marina in Buras, Louisiana.
Aerial view of the Development Driller III, which is drilling a relief well at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is surrounded by oily water in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. the source of the growing oil spill in the Gulf of M
857-56317 - Aerial view of the Development Driller III, which is drilling a relief well at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is surrounded by oily water in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. the source of the growing oil spill in the Gulf of M
Clean-up crews sucking oil with vacuum tubes and placing absorbent pompom booms.   East Grand Terre was involved in a Barrier Island restoration project before the oil spill.
857-56571 - Clean-up crews sucking oil with vacuum tubes and placing absorbent pompom booms. East Grand Terre was involved in a Barrier Island restoration project before the oil spill.
Press tour with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. Clean-up crews sucking oil with vacuum tubes and placing absorbant pompom booms.   East Grand Terre was involved in a Barrier Island restoration project before the oil spill.
857-56560 - Press tour with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. Clean-up crews sucking oil with vacuum tubes and placing absorbant pompom booms. East Grand Terre was involved in a Barrier Island restoration project before the oil spill.
Aerial view of oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana.
857-56326 - Aerial view of oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana.
Press tour with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. Clean-up crews sucking oil with vacuum tubes and placing absorbant pompom booms.   East Grand Terre was involved in a Barrier Island restoration project before the oil spill.
857-56561 - Press tour with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. Clean-up crews sucking oil with vacuum tubes and placing absorbant pompom booms. East Grand Terre was involved in a Barrier Island restoration project before the oil spill.
Aerial view of the Development Driller III, which is drilling a relief well at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is surrounded by oily water in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. the source of the growing oil spill in the Gulf of M
857-56323 - Aerial view of the Development Driller III, which is drilling a relief well at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is surrounded by oily water in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. the source of the growing oil spill in the Gulf of M
Weathered oil slick on beach, Southern Morocco   (RR)
971-16 - Weathered oil slick on beach, Southern Morocco (RR)
Oil slick, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill      (rr)
915-114 - Oil slick, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill (rr)
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-105 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire      (rr)
915-118 - Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire (rr)
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-104 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-106 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-107 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-103 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-108 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire
915-116 - Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire
Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire      (rr)
915-117 - Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire (rr)
Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire
915-119 - Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire
Pumping oil from stoney foreshore, MPCU, Wisemen's Bridge, Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire      (rr)
915-120 - Pumping oil from stoney foreshore, MPCU, Wisemen's Bridge, Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire (rr)
Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill      (rr)
915-109 - Oil clean up, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill (rr)
Emulsified oil, Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire
915-110 - Emulsified oil, Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire
Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire
915-115 - Oil spill clean up, Suandersfoot, Sea Empress, Pembrokeshire
Algal turf growth after Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire      (rr)
915-122 - Algal turf growth after Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire (rr)
Algal turf growth after Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire      (rr)
915-121 - Algal turf growth after Sea Empress oil spill, Pembrokeshire (rr)
Oil slick, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
915-113 - Oil slick, West Angle Bay, Sea Empress oil spill
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4974 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4971 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) on the beach at a breeding and molting site on Carcass Island, Falkland Islands, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Magellanic penguin nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-9187 - Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) on the beach at a breeding and molting site on Carcass Island, Falkland Islands, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Magellanic penguin nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4966 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4978 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4969 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4963 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4968 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) at a breeding and molting site on East Island, Falkland Islands, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-9186 - Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) at a breeding and molting site on East Island, Falkland Islands, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4967 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4972 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4975 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4980 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4965 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at a breeding and molting site in Estancia San Lorenzo on Peninsula Valdez, Patagonia, Argentina, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-9333 - Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at a breeding and molting site in Estancia San Lorenzo on Peninsula Valdez, Patagonia, Argentina, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4964 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) on the beach at a breeding and molting site on Carcass Island, Falkland Islands, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Magellanic penguin nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-9188 - Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) on the beach at a breeding and molting site on Carcass Island, Falkland Islands, South Atlantic. MORE INFO Magellanic penguin nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Magellanic penguins mate with the same partner year after year. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4979 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4970 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4977 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4976 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
979-4973 - The Magellanic Penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African Penguin, the Humboldt Penguin and the Galápagos Penguin. Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm (24-30 in) tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg (5.9-14.3 lbs), with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young. Magellanic Penguins can live up to 25 years, while ages of 30 years have been reached in captivity. Nests are built under bushes or in burrows. Two eggs are laid. Incubation lasts 39-42 days, a task which the parents share in 10-15 day shifts. The chicks are cared for by both parents for 29 days and are fed every 2-3 days. Normally both are raised through adulthood, though occasionally only one chick is raised. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner year after year. The male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and wait to reconnect with his female partner. The females are able to recognize their mates through their call alone. Millions of these penguins still live on the coasts of Chile and Argentina, but the species is classified as "Near Threatened," primarily due to the vulnerability of large breeding colonies to oil spills, which kill 20,000 adults and 22,000 juveniles every year off the coast of Argentina.
Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-2316 - Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-2314 - Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Mute swan and cygnets covered in oil from an oil spill in Cley, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-1976 - Mute swan and cygnets covered in oil from an oil spill in Cley, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-2315 - Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-2313 - Rare native white clawed crayfish killed by an illegal chemical spill on the river Mint near Kendal, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Mute swan and cygnets covered in oil from an oil spill in Cley, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-1975 - Mute swan and cygnets covered in oil from an oil spill in Cley, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom, Europe
one spilled coffee cup in street road in city town at night
817-334597 - one spilled coffee cup in street road in city town at night
Wales, Pembrokeshire, Tenby, Scooter Duck covered in oil after Sea Empress spill, being cleaned
797-7351 - Wales, Pembrokeshire, Tenby, Scooter Duck covered in oil after Sea Empress spill, being cleaned
Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) after the fuel spill ('chapapote') from tanker Prestige, Dec, 2002, Spain
817-152328 - Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) after the fuel spill ('chapapote') from tanker Prestige, Dec, 2002, Spain
Woman trying to squeeze her packed travel case shut.
817-170025 - Woman trying to squeeze her packed travel case shut.
Trekker heading behind Sutherland Falls Milford Track Fiordland National Park New Zealand
817-117034 - Trekker heading behind Sutherland Falls Milford Track Fiordland National Park New Zealand
Recuperation of marine birds after the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Pontevedra province, Galicia, Spain
817-65161 - Recuperation of marine birds after the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Pontevedra province, Galicia, Spain
Floating barrier to stop pollution from the fuel spilled by the Prestige Tanker ecological disaster, Bahia de Santander, Cantabria, Spain
817-65605 - Floating barrier to stop pollution from the fuel spilled by the Prestige Tanker ecological disaster, Bahia de Santander, Cantabria, Spain
Floating barrier to contain the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, San Vicente de la Barquera, Cantabria, Spain
817-65570 - Floating barrier to contain the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, San Vicente de la Barquera, Cantabria, Spain
Volunteer dressed with protective clothing to gather the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
817-65206 - Volunteer dressed with protective clothing to gather the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
Soldiers dressed with protective clothing cleaning up the oil spill ('chapapote') from Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Costa da Morte, A Coruna province, Galicia, Spain
817-65178 - Soldiers dressed with protective clothing cleaning up the oil spill ('chapapote') from Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Costa da Morte, A Coruna province, Galicia, Spain
Volunteers dressed with protective clothing to gather the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
817-65199 - Volunteers dressed with protective clothing to gather the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
Volunteers dressed with protective clothing gathering the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
817-65200 - Volunteers dressed with protective clothing gathering the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
Floating barrier to stop pollution from the fuel spilled by the Prestige Tanker ecological disaster, Bahia de Santander, Cantabria, Spain
817-65606 - Floating barrier to stop pollution from the fuel spilled by the Prestige Tanker ecological disaster, Bahia de Santander, Cantabria, Spain
Hand of volunteer dressed with protective clothing to gather the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
817-65194 - Hand of volunteer dressed with protective clothing to gather the fuel spill ('chapapote') of Prestige tanker, Dec, 2002, Galicia, Spain
The Rio Verde waterfall, one of many in the valley of the Pastaza River that flows from the Andes to the upper Amazon Basin, near Banos, Ambato Province, Central Highlands, Ecuador, South America
83-12205 - The Rio Verde waterfall, one of many in the valley of the Pastaza River that flows from the Andes to the upper Amazon Basin, near Banos, Ambato Province, Central Highlands, Ecuador, South America
Tung Choi street, Mong Kok district market, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China, Asia
741-1805 - Tung Choi street, Mong Kok district market, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China, Asia
Tung Choi street, Mong Kok district market, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China, Asia
741-1804 - Tung Choi street, Mong Kok district market, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China, Asia
Boy under a water spout, WaterTemple, Bali, Indonesia
252-1690 - Boy under a water spout, WaterTemple, Bali, Indonesia
Iguacu Falls, Argentina, South America
312-1032 - Iguacu Falls, Argentina, South America
Canaima Lagoon and falls, Canaima National Park, Venezuela, South America
367-3863 - Canaima Lagoon and falls, Canaima National Park, Venezuela, South America
Seljalandsfoss waterfall in the south of the island, Iceland
733-82 - Seljalandsfoss waterfall in the south of the island, Iceland
Pohutu Geyser at Whakarewarewa, Rotorua, South Auckland, North Island, New Zealand, Pacific
126-1454 - Pohutu Geyser at Whakarewarewa, Rotorua, South Auckland, North Island, New Zealand, Pacific
The wettest place on Earth, Mt. Waialeale, Kauai, Hawaii, USA
29-3579 - The wettest place on Earth, Mt. Waialeale, Kauai, Hawaii, USA
A Tsubakai, a stone wash basin for the tea room, Ryoan-ji Temple in NW Kyoto, Honshu, Japan *** Local Caption *** The Zen inscription reads 'I learn only to be contented'
83-5418 - A Tsubakai, a stone wash basin for the tea room, Ryoan-ji Temple in NW Kyoto, Honshu, Japan *** Local Caption *** The Zen inscription reads 'I learn only to be contented'
Pulteney Bridge and weir on the River Avon, Bath, Avon, England, UK
485-5504 - Pulteney Bridge and weir on the River Avon, Bath, Avon, England, UK