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A Light Standard And An Ornate Building With Sculptures Lining The Roof, Venice, Venezia, Italy
1116-41421 - A Light Standard And An Ornate Building With Sculptures Lining The Roof, Venice, Venezia, Italy
Medina Sidonia, Andalusia, Spain, A Light Post With 5 Lamps On It
1116-41334 - Medina Sidonia, Andalusia, Spain, A Light Post With 5 Lamps On It
Standard Ministries designed by Oscar Niemeyer in 1958, part of the Pilot Plan, Brasilia, Brazil, South America
975-310 - Standard Ministries designed by Oscar Niemeyer in 1958, part of the Pilot Plan, Brasilia, Brazil, South America
Standard Ministries designed by Oscar Niemeyer in 1958, part of the Pilot Plan, Brasilia, Brazil, South America
975-312 - Standard Ministries designed by Oscar Niemeyer in 1958, part of the Pilot Plan, Brasilia, Brazil, South America
Coldstream Guards parading en route to Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
747-1865 - Coldstream Guards parading en route to Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Band of the Coldstream Guards with their Standard, during Changing of the Guard, Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
747-1864 - Band of the Coldstream Guards with their Standard, during Changing of the Guard, Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Coldstream Guards on parade during Changing of the Guard, Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
747-1866 - Coldstream Guards on parade during Changing of the Guard, Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Flag-waver the Contrada of the Snail, Contrada della Chiocciola, at the Palio di Siena, Piazza del Campo, Siena, Tuscany, Italy, Europe
832-378719 - Flag-waver the Contrada of the Snail, Contrada della Chiocciola, at the Palio di Siena, Piazza del Campo, Siena, Tuscany, Italy, Europe
Formal Standard of Length from 1878, the Guildhall, London EC2, England, United Kingdom, Europe
685-2549 - Formal Standard of Length from 1878, the Guildhall, London EC2, England, United Kingdom, Europe
German flag with two helicopters, Reichstag, Berlin, Germany
832-349994 - German flag with two helicopters, Reichstag, Berlin, Germany
Roman style trophy sculptures, Gloriette, Schoenbrunn, Vienna, Austria
832-321717 - Roman style trophy sculptures, Gloriette, Schoenbrunn, Vienna, Austria
IND; India, Udaipur : Luxury Hotel resort of the Oberoi group. Udaivilas at the Pichola lake. Bathroom of a standard room. |
832-313354 - IND; India, Udaipur : Luxury Hotel resort of the Oberoi group. Udaivilas at the Pichola lake. Bathroom of a standard room. |
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5702 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5704 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada young man in livery costume at traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5696 - Contrada young man in livery costume at traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5694 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5698 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Spanish banners at medieval building in Plaza de la Constitucion 19 March 1812 in Laredo, Cantabria, Spain
1161-6287 - Spanish banners at medieval building in Plaza de la Constitucion 19 March 1812 in Laredo, Cantabria, Spain
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5705 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5701 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada young man in livery costumes at traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5697 - Contrada young man in livery costumes at traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5700 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Members of the Corso Contrada in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5692 - Members of the Corso Contrada in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
Spanish banners at medieval building in Plaza de la Constitucion 19 March 1812 in Laredo, Cantabria, Spain
1161-6286 - Spanish banners at medieval building in Plaza de la Constitucion 19 March 1812 in Laredo, Cantabria, Spain
Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
1161-5703 - Contrada members in livery costumes for traditional parade in Asciano, inTuscany, Italy
International German Gymnastics Festival 2009 procession, standard-bearers, Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany, Europe
832-223858 - International German Gymnastics Festival 2009 procession, standard-bearers, Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany, Europe
Br Standard Class Steam Engine 4 2-6-4t, Goathland, North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, Europe
1130-1542 - Br Standard Class Steam Engine 4 2-6-4t, Goathland, North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Banners and flags, detail, Bavaria, Upper Bavaria, Germany, Europe
832-199936 - Banners and flags, detail, Bavaria, Upper Bavaria, Germany, Europe
Banners and flags, detail, Bavaria, Upper Bavaria, Germany, Europe
832-199935 - Banners and flags, detail, Bavaria, Upper Bavaria, Germany, Europe
Standard Chartered Bank building, Phuket town, Thailand, Southeast Asia, Asia
238-6387 - Standard Chartered Bank building, Phuket town, Thailand, Southeast Asia, Asia
Standard Stamp Mill, mine and mine buildings, mine, ghost town of Bodie, a former gold mining town, Bodie State Historic Park, California, United States of America, USA
832-67891 - Standard Stamp Mill, mine and mine buildings, mine, ghost town of Bodie, a former gold mining town, Bodie State Historic Park, California, United States of America, USA
Standard bearer in traditional clothes, Palio parade, Alba, Piemont, Italy
1127-948 - Standard bearer in traditional clothes, Palio parade, Alba, Piemont, Italy
Standard bearer, Palio parade, Asti, Piemont, Italy
1127-907 - Standard bearer, Palio parade, Asti, Piemont, Italy
Shelby County Courthouse Memphis Tennessee TN
817-415176 - Shelby County Courthouse Memphis Tennessee TN
standard bank building, port area, maputo, mozambique
817-413164 - standard bank building, port area, maputo, mozambique
Pool Area Rooftop Bar, Hotel The Standard, Downtown L.A., Los Angeles, California, USA
1113-84848 - Pool Area Rooftop Bar, Hotel The Standard, Downtown L.A., Los Angeles, California, USA
Rooftop Bar, Hotel The Standard, Downtown L.A., Los Angeles, California, USA
1113-84200 - Rooftop Bar, Hotel The Standard, Downtown L.A., Los Angeles, California, USA
Rooftop Bar, Hotel The Standard, Downtown L.A., Los Angeles, California, USA
1113-84852 - Rooftop Bar, Hotel The Standard, Downtown L.A., Los Angeles, California, USA
Standard bearer, Procession in traditional costumes, Palio, Alba, Langhe, Piedmont, Italy
1113-41700 - Standard bearer, Procession in traditional costumes, Palio, Alba, Langhe, Piedmont, Italy
Woman relaxing at the Standard Hotel Rooftop Bar, Downtown Los Angeles, California, USA, United Sates of America
1113-22957 - Woman relaxing at the Standard Hotel Rooftop Bar, Downtown Los Angeles, California, USA, United Sates of America
Woman relaxing at the Standard Hotel Roof Bar, Downtown Los Angeles, California, USA, United States of America
1113-22958 - Woman relaxing at the Standard Hotel Roof Bar, Downtown Los Angeles, California, USA, United States of America
Standard Bread in Portland, Maine
857-67186 - Standard Bread in Portland, Maine
German soccer fans celebrating on Leopoldstrasse, Maxvorstadt, Munich, Bavaria, Germany
1113-958 - German soccer fans celebrating on Leopoldstrasse, Maxvorstadt, Munich, Bavaria, Germany
The Royal Standard flying above Buckingham Palace showing the Queen in residence during the 2012 Trooping the Colour ceremony, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
377-3875 - The Royal Standard flying above Buckingham Palace showing the Queen in residence during the 2012 Trooping the Colour ceremony, London, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity.  The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints.  As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another.  The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous.  Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms.  All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
1031-46 - Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity. The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints. As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another. The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous. Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms. All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity.  The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints.  As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another.  The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous.  Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms.  All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
1031-47 - Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity. The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints. As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another. The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous. Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms. All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity.  The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints.  As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another.  The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous.  Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms.  All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
1031-45 - Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity. The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints. As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another. The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous. Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms. All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity.  The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints.  As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another.  The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous.  Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms.  All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
1031-48 - Orkney Islands Sept 2011 Wave and Tidal Power shoot - The Pelamis Wave Power machine in Orkney - alongside in Lyness - the machine is the P2 . The Pelamis absorbs the energy of ocean waves and converts it into electricity. The machine floats semi-submerged on the surface of the water and is made up of a number of cylindrical sections joined together by hinged joints. As waves pass down the length of the machine these sections flex relative to one another. The motion at each hinged joint is resisted by hydraulic cylinders which pump fluid into high pressure accumulators allowing electrical generation to be smooth and continuous. Control of the resistance applied by the hydraulic cylinders allows generation to be maximised when waves are small, and the machine response to be minimised in storms. All generation systems are sealed and dry inside the machines and power is transmitted to shore using standard subsea cables and equipment.
White morph with standard coloured yellow eyed penguins (Hoiho), (Megadyptes antipodes), Enderby Island, Auckland Islands, Sub-antarctic Islands, New Zealand, Southern Ocean.
1034-131 - White morph with standard coloured yellow eyed penguins (Hoiho), (Megadyptes antipodes), Enderby Island, Auckland Islands, Sub-antarctic Islands, New Zealand, Southern Ocean.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4551 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
A possible new species of Orca (Killer Whale) called "Type B"  Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
979-253 - A possible new species of Orca (Killer Whale) called "Type B" Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4572 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4548 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4562 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4552 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4574 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4560 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4546 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4565 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
A possible new species of Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
979-252 - A possible new species of Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4569 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4549 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4541 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4543 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4571 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4544 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4553 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4556 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4568 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4547 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4566 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
A possible new species of Orca (Killer Whale) called "Type B"  Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
979-249 - A possible new species of Orca (Killer Whale) called "Type B" Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4567 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4542 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4554 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4555 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4545 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4561 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-3944 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4573 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4557 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4563 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4559 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4550 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4558 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-7097 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4564 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
979-4570 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer transits Lemaire Channel in late evening light on the west side of the Antarctic peninsula in Antarctica. Lemaire Channel is a strait off Antarctica, located between the mainland's Antarctic Peninsula and Booth Island. It is one of the top tourist destinations in Antarctica; steep cliffs hem in the iceberg-filled passage, which is 11 km long and just 1,600 meters wide at its narrowest point. It was first seen by the German expedition of 1873-74, but not traversed until December 1898, when the Belgica of the de Gerlache expedition passed through. De Gerlache named it for Charles Lemaire, a Belgian explorer of the Congo. The channel has since become a standard part of the itinerary for cruising in Antarctica; not only is it scenic, but the protected waters are usually as still as a lake, a rare occurrence in the storm-wracked southern seas, and the north-south traverse delivers vessels close to Pleneau and Petermann Islands for landings. The principal difficulty is that icebergs may fill the channel, especially in early season, obliging a ship to backtrack and go around the outside of Booth Island in order to reach both Pleneau and Petermann Islands.
A possible new species of Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
979-251 - A possible new species of Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
A possible new species of Orca (Killer Whale) called "Type B"  Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
979-254 - A possible new species of Orca (Killer Whale) called "Type B" Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
A possible new species of Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
979-250 - A possible new species of Orca (with a proposed new scientific name of Orcinus nanus) traveling in the Lemaire Strait, Antarctica. These Orca are charchterized by very large eye patches, a two-tone gray cape coloration, and a relatively small size when compared to standard, or "type A" Orca. This Type B Orca has become specialized in the taking and eating of pinnipeds here in Antarctica.
Loch Schiel with the Glenfinnan monument, where Bonnie Prince Charlie raised his standard at the beginning of the 1745 Jacobite Rising, Scotland, United Kingdom, Europe
935-59 - Loch Schiel with the Glenfinnan monument, where Bonnie Prince Charlie raised his standard at the beginning of the 1745 Jacobite Rising, Scotland, United Kingdom, Europe
A Carbon Trust standard display at Manchester airport, outlining how they are reducing their carbon footprint, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-6788 - A Carbon Trust standard display at Manchester airport, outlining how they are reducing their carbon footprint, England, United Kingdom, Europe
A Carbon Trust standard display at Manchester airport, outlining how they are reducing their carbon footprint, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-6787 - A Carbon Trust standard display at Manchester airport, outlining how they are reducing their carbon footprint, England, United Kingdom, Europe
A nameplate indicating manufacturing year and place is fixed on frontside of a freight car, Mhow, Madhyapradesh, India
817-190563 - A nameplate indicating manufacturing year and place is fixed on frontside of a freight car, Mhow, Madhyapradesh, India
balinese women carrying offerings to a ceremony
817-185000 - balinese women carrying offerings to a ceremony
Feldberg, beech forest in winter, nature reserve, trunks of standard forest, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany
817-175748 - Feldberg, beech forest in winter, nature reserve, trunks of standard forest, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany
Standard Hotel, High Line, elevated public park on former rail tracks, Manhattan, New York City, United States of America, North America
807-764 - Standard Hotel, High Line, elevated public park on former rail tracks, Manhattan, New York City, United States of America, North America
Procession of the Madonna of the Martyrs, Fonni, Nuoro province, Sardinia, Italy
817-97980 - Procession of the Madonna of the Martyrs, Fonni, Nuoro province, Sardinia, Italy