Robert Harding

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860-291096 - Tail of Blue whale diving (Balaenoptera musculus) Reaching a maximum confirmed length of 30 meters and weighing up to 200 tons, it is the largest animal known to have ever existed. Azores, Portugal, Atlantic Ocean.
746-91870 - Yellow-footed rock-wallaby, Petrogale xanthopus, in the Flinders Ranges National Park in the outback of South Australia. Mother with Joey in pouch. Australia, South Australia, Flinders Ranges National Park
746-91867 - Yellow-footed rock-wallaby, Petrogale xanthopus, in the Flinders Ranges National Park in the outback of South Australia. Mother with Joey in pouch. Australia, South Australia, Flinders Ranges National Park
746-91869 - Yellow-footed rock-wallaby, Petrogale xanthopus, in the Flinders Ranges National Park in the outback of South Australia. Mother with Joey in pouch. Australia, South Australia, Flinders Ranges National Park
746-91868 - Yellow-footed rock-wallaby, Petrogale xanthopus, in the Flinders Ranges National Park in the outback of South Australia. Mother with Joey in pouch. Australia, South Australia, Flinders Ranges National Park
1116-51965 - Black wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou) standing in the golden long grass of the savanna looking back over shoulder at the camera at the Gabus Game Ranch; Otavi, Otjozondjupa, Namibia
1116-51933 - Portrait of a southern yellow-billed hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) perching in profile on a bush. It has mottled black and brown feathers, a white head and a yellow beak, taken at the Gabus Game Ranch; Otavi, Otjozondjupa, Namibia
1116-51940 - Hartmann's mountain zebra (Equus zebra hartmannae) staring at the camera while standing in the shade under some trees at the Gabus Game Ranch at sunset; Otavi, Otjozondjupa, Namibia
860-289980 - Tail of Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) is the largest animal ever known to have existed. This may be the pygmy sub-species of blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus. Mirissa, Sri Lanka, Indian Ocean Photo taken under permit
1350-91 - A telescopic closeup of Comet Lovejoy (C/2014 Q2) on January 19, 2015. I shot this from near Silver City, New Mexico, using a TMB 92mm apo refractor at f/4.4 and using a Canon 6D at ISO 1600 for a stack of 4 x 5 minute exposures. The ion tail is primarily from a single exposure to minimize blurring from the comet's motion relative to the stars. The rest of the image is from the stacked combination to minimize noise.
1350-93 - A telescopic closeup of Comet Lovejoy (C/2014 Q2) on January 17, 2015, showing structure in the ion gas tail, in the form of streamers and discontinuities in the tail.
1350-116 - This is Comet NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) over the Horseshoe Canyon formation near Drumheller, Alberta on the night iof July 10-11, 2020, taken about 2 a.m. MDT with the comet just past lower culmination with it circumpolar at this time. Warm light from the rising waning gibbous Moon provides the illumination. The comet's faint blue ion tail is just barely visible even in the moonlit sky and low altitude. The glow of summer perpetual twilight at latitude 51.5�8 N still colours the northern horizon despite this being close to the middle of the night.
1350-120 - This is Comet NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) over Deadhorse Lake near Hussar in southern Alberta, taken just after midnight on July 10-11, 2020 during its evening appearance. The comet shines just above low noctilucent clouds. The slight wind ruffled the waters enough to prevent the clean reflection I was after.
1350-134 - The tail of Scorpius, photographed with it high in the sky from Australia. The frame is oriented with the Milky Way running horizontally and the hook of the tail vertically.
1350-34 - All of Scorpius, plus parts of Lupus and Ara regions of the southern Milky Way. This area was directly overhead when I took this at about 4:30 am local time on April 6, 2014 from near Coonabarabran, Australia. The head of Scorpius is at top his tail at bottom though you could turn this image any direction and it would be correct as seen in the sky at this latitude, depending on the time of night. But in portrait mode like this north is at top. Along the Milky Way are numerous nebulas, including the False Comet area, the Cat's Paw area, and the colourful nebulas around Antares at top. The dark Pipe Nebula is at left of frame.
1350-16 - Comet Holmes, 17P, taken Nov 1, 2007 on excellent night. Taken with A&M 105mm apo refractor at f/5 with Borg 0.85x compressor/field flattener on SkyWatcher HEQ5 mount. Canon 20Da camera at ISO400. Composite of 4 min, 2min, 1min, 30sec, 15sec, and 7 sec exposures, each exposure being a stack of 3 to 4 identical exposures. Registered and stacked in Photoshop (HDR mode did not produce usable result, so manually composited with sucessively smaller masks to reveal short exposure content around nucleus. Contrast exaggerated with Curves to bring out very faint tail structure. North up, so tail to the S and SW.Nucleus is dot at upper left of inner coma, other star in inner coma at right is a field star
1348-2149 - Bacterium responsible for syphilis. Electron micrograph of Treponema pallidum on cultures of cotton-tail rabbit epithelium cells (Sf1Ep).Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis. In the United States, over 35,600 cases of syphilis were repor
1348-1151 - Syphilis bacterium. Treponema pallidum subsp pallidum on cultures of cotton tail rabbit epithelium cells Sf1Ep Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis In the United States over 35 600 cases of syphilis were reported by health officials in 1
1348-1152 - Syphilis bacterium. Treponema pallidum subsp pallidum on cultures of cotton tail rabbit epithelium cells Sf1Ep. Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis In the United States over 35 600 cases of syphilis were reported by health officials in
1116-49969 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) lifts it's fluke as it feeds in Lynn Canal, with Herbert Glacier and Coast Range in the background; Alaska, United States of America