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Mforo, Tanzania a village near Moshi, Tanzania. Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray and her eldest daughter Zainabu Ramadhani, 19 cook lunch in her kitchen house using both a clean cookstove using wood and one using coal.  One of her younger daughters, Nasma Ramadhani, age 5 helps out.                                                                     Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking.   “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.”  Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow.  “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94727 - Mforo, Tanzania a village near Moshi, Tanzania. Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray and her eldest daughter Zainabu Ramadhani, 19 cook lunch in her kitchen house using both a clean cookstove using wood and one using coal. One of her younger daughters, Nasma Ramadhani, age 5 helps out. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania.   Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking.   “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.”  Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow.  “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94726 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania.   Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking.   “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.”  Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow.  “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94728 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
Ester Hodari, age 22 years old, cooks dinner using the traditional three-rock cook stove with a fire in the middle. These cookstoves use a lot of fuel, firewood, and produce a lot of smoke. Ester told us that cooking with this type of stove made her eyes turn red and she often had a chest cough. Her children, ages 5, 2 and 3 months are often with her when she is cooking. Her sister-in-law, Shadya Jumanne, age 11, helps her cook as well. Not long ago Ester’s 3 month-old developed a cough, It kept getting worse and so they took her by motorcycle to the hospital at night. Ester started really worrying about this.  After this Ester and her husband agreed that they needed to buy a clean cookstove and started saving. The girl helping Ester cook in some of the images is her sister-in-law Shadya Jumanne, age 11.  Ester met Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray when she married her husband and moved to this village, Mforo near Moshi, Tanzania. Ester said that Fatma is like a mother to her in the village. When Fatma showed Ester the new wood stove she saw that is used less wood and produced less smoke.
857-94725 - Ester Hodari, age 22 years old, cooks dinner using the traditional three-rock cook stove with a fire in the middle. These cookstoves use a lot of fuel, firewood, and produce a lot of smoke. Ester told us that cooking with this type of stove made her eyes turn red and she often had a chest cough. Her children, ages 5, 2 and 3 months are often with her when she is cooking. Her sister-in-law, Shadya Jumanne, age 11, helps her cook as well. Not long ago Ester’s 3 month-old developed a cough, It kept getting worse and so they took her by motorcycle to the hospital at night. Ester started really worrying about this. After this Ester and her husband agreed that they needed to buy a clean cookstove and started saving. The girl helping Ester cook in some of the images is her sister-in-law Shadya Jumanne, age 11. Ester met Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray when she married her husband and moved to this village, Mforo near Moshi, Tanzania. Ester said that Fatma is like a mother to her in the village. When Fatma showed Ester the new wood stove she saw that is used less wood and produced less smoke.
Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania.   Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking.   “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.”  Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow.  “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
857-94729 - Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt) her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress) and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania. Fatma Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove using firewood was causing her to have a lot of heath problems, her lungs congested her eyes stinging and her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way. Some days she felt so bad she couldn't go in to cook. Fatma said, “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking. “With the extra time I can develop my business. I also have more time for the family. I can monitor my children’s studies. All of this makes for a happier family and a better relationship with my husband. Since using the clean cookstove no one has been sick or gone to the hospital due to flu.” Fatma sees herself helping her community because she no longer sees the people that she has sold cookstoves have red eyes, coughing or sick like they used to be. She has been able to help with the school fees for her children, purchase items for the home and a cow. “What makes me wake up early every morning and take my cookstoves and go to my business is to be able to take my family to school as well as to get food and other family needs.”
809-7253 - Serengeti National Park. Group of African Elephants with Baby (Loxodonta africana). Tanzania.
809-7262 - Serengeti National Park. Herd of zebras (Equus quagga) drinking water. Tanzania.
809-7255 - Serengeti National Park. Lioness and cub (Panthera leo). Tanzania.
809-7257 - Serengeti National Park. Lion cubs (Panthera leo). Tanzania.
809-7256 - Serengeti National Park. Lion cubs (Panthera leo). Tanzania.
809-7264 - Serengeti National Park. Giraffes ( (Giraffa camelopardalis ) at sunset. Silhouettes. Tanzania.
809-7266 - Serengeti National Park. Young Giraffes ( (Giraffa camelopardalis ). Tanzania.
809-7263 - Serengeti National Park. Zebra surrounded with black and white stripes. Tanzania.
809-7265 - Serengeti National Park. Giraffe ( (Giraffa camelopardalis ) at sunset. Silhouette. Tanzania.
764-5920 - Lion (Panthera leo) cubs about four weeks old, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5922 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5917 - Grant's Gazelle (Gazella granti) buck, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5925 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5918 - Golden Jackal (Canis aureus), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5919 - Blue Wildebeest (brindled gnu) (Connochaetes taurinus) new-born calf, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5921 - Two Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5897 - Black-breasted snake eagle (black-chested snake eagle) (Circaetus pectoralis), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5916 - Lioness (Lion) (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5915 - Lioness (Lion) (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5913 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with a baby blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5908 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5904 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5901 - African Elephant (Loxodonta africana), male mud bathing, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5899 - African Elephant (Loxodonta africana), male, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5907 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5914 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5909 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) cub, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5911 - Common Zebra (Plains Zebra) (Burchell's Zebra) (Equus burchelli) drinking, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5910 - Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5902 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5898 - Lion (Panthera leo), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5903 - African Elephant (Loxodonta africana), male, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5906 - Marsh Owl (Asio capensis), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5905 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5912 - Impala (Aepyceros melampus) doe and minutes-old calf, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5900 - Two Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5874 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5894 - The Migration, blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and common zebra (Equus burchelli), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5896 - Young male lion (Panthera leo), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5893 - Young male lion (Panthera leo), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5895 - The Migration, common zebra (plains zebra) (Burchell's zebra) (Equus burchelli), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5883 - Acacia tree at dawn, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5882 - Blue wildebeest (brindled gnu) (Connochaetes taurinus) migration, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5873 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub and its mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
764-5870 - Lion (Panthera leo), two cubs playing with their mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5891 - Leopard (Panthera pardus), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5888 - Leopard (Panthera pardus) relaxing in a tree, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5881 - Caracal (Caracal caracal), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5879 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5886 - Leopard (Panthera pardus) relaxing in a tree, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5865 - Four lion (Panthera leo) cubs, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5884 - Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) calf by its mother, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5892 - Leopard (Panthera pardus) drinking, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5875 - Two lion (Panthera leo) cubs and their mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5866 - Vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops) mother nursing her infant, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5869 - African elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5871 - Two lion (Panthera leo) cubs and their mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5880 - Caracal (Caracal caracal), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5877 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub and its mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5889 - Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5890 - Leopard (Panthera pardus) relaxing in a tree, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5887 - Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) in a hippo pool, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5867 - Vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops) nursing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5862 - Coke's hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus cokii), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5868 - Helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5878 - Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5876 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5885 - Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) in a hippo pool, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5864 - Common zebra (plains zebra) (Burchell's zebra) (Equus burchelli) mare and just-born foal, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5863 - African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
764-5872 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Cape buffalo (African buffalo) (Syncerus caffer) cow and calf, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5850 - Cape buffalo (African buffalo) (Syncerus caffer) cow and calf, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Red-billed oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) on a Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5854 - Red-billed oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) on a Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Superb starling (Lamprotornis superbus), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5855 - Superb starling (Lamprotornis superbus), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Two lion (Panthera leo) cubs playing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5842 - Two lion (Panthera leo) cubs playing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Two lion (Panthera leo) cubs playing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5846 - Two lion (Panthera leo) cubs playing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
African elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5856 - African elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo) resting, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5841 - Lion (Panthera leo) resting, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Cape buffalo (African buffalo) (Syncerus caffer) cow and calf, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5852 - Cape buffalo (African buffalo) (Syncerus caffer) cow and calf, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5839 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Red-billed oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) on a Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5851 - Red-billed oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) on a Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo) cub rubbing against its mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5845 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub rubbing against its mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Blue wildebeest (brindled gnu) (Connochaetes taurinus) calf, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5858 - Blue wildebeest (brindled gnu) (Connochaetes taurinus) calf, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus) in flight, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5853 - African white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus) in flight, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo) cubs and their mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5849 - Lion (Panthera leo) cubs and their mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
African elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5857 - African elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5840 - Lion (Panthera leo), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) adult and piglet, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5835 - Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) adult and piglet, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Three lion (Panthera leo) cubs, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5838 - Three lion (Panthera leo) cubs, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Olive baboon (Papio cynocephalus anubis) juvenile grooming an adult male, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5860 - Olive baboon (Papio cynocephalus anubis) juvenile grooming an adult male, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Two lionesses (Panthera leo) and a cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5843 - Two lionesses (Panthera leo) and a cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Grey crowned crane (Southern crowned crane) (Balearica regulorum), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5837 - Grey crowned crane (Southern crowned crane) (Balearica regulorum), Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) mud bathing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5834 - Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) mud bathing, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5844 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
Lion (Panthera leo) cub and its mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa
764-5847 - Lion (Panthera leo) cub and its mother, Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, East Africa, Africa