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Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), floats under water, Pleneau Island, Antarctica
832-382842 - Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), floats under water, Pleneau Island, Antarctica
Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) on ice floe at Sawyer Glacier, Tracy Arm Fjord, Alaska, USA, North America
832-382841 - Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) on ice floe at Sawyer Glacier, Tracy Arm Fjord, Alaska, USA, North America
Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), Plettenberg Bay, Garden Route, District Eden, Western Cape, South Africa, Africa
832-381390 - Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), Plettenberg Bay, Garden Route, District Eden, Western Cape, South Africa, Africa
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) on the beach, howler, Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
832-382103 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) on the beach, howler, Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
Harp Seal or Saddleback Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus, Phoca groenlandica), pup on pack ice, Magdalen Islands, Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Quebec, Canada, North America
832-381669 - Harp Seal or Saddleback Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus, Phoca groenlandica), pup on pack ice, Magdalen Islands, Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Quebec, Canada, North America
Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus), pup suckling on mother, Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
832-379328 - Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus), pup suckling on mother, Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) at sunrise, Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
832-379329 - Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) at sunrise, Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), pup on beach, portrait, Helgoland, North Sea, Germany, Europe
832-378967 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), pup on beach, portrait, Helgoland, North Sea, Germany, Europe
Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) Young animal, Schleswig-Holstein, Helgoland, Germany, Europe
832-378823 - Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) Young animal, Schleswig-Holstein, Helgoland, Germany, Europe
Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) Young animal in sandstorm, Schleswig-Holstein, Helgoland, Germany, Europe
832-378824 - Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) Young animal in sandstorm, Schleswig-Holstein, Helgoland, Germany, Europe
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), on the beach of the island of Heligoland, Helgoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
832-374094 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), on the beach of the island of Heligoland, Helgoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female and young in sandstorm
832-283103 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female and young in sandstorm
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female and young suckling
832-283106 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female and young suckling
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female, portrait after sandstorm
832-283094 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female, portrait after sandstorm
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young
832-283102 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female, portrait after sandstorm
832-283093 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female, portrait after sandstorm
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young cuddling
832-283104 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young cuddling
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young cuddling
832-283100 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young cuddling
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), newborn
832-283101 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), newborn
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young in sandstorm
832-283095 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with young in sandstorm
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), young which is some weeks old
832-283097 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), young which is some weeks old
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), young which is some weeks old
832-283098 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), young which is some weeks old
Cape Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) eating an octopus, Plettenberg Bay, South Africa.
(Resolution Restricted - pls contact us)   (RR)
927-23 - Cape Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) eating an octopus, Plettenberg Bay, South Africa. (Resolution Restricted - pls contact us) (RR)
Beach master, Male Elephant Seal, South Georgia patrolling the shore
1060-2 - Beach master, Male Elephant Seal, South Georgia patrolling the shore
Cape Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus)  playing with an octopus, Plettenberg Bay, South Africa.   (RR)
927-24 - Cape Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) playing with an octopus, Plettenberg Bay, South Africa. (RR)
Leopard seal, Antarctica
1072-65 - Leopard seal, Antarctica
A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) looking right at the camera, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
930-64 - A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) looking right at the camera, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) suckling milk from its mother, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
930-65 - A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) suckling milk from its mother, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
A curious bull Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus)  in Gairloch Harbour, Scotland.
930-62 - A curious bull Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) in Gairloch Harbour, Scotland.
Leopard seal, Antarctica
1072-56 - Leopard seal, Antarctica
A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) resting on seaweed, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
930-63 - A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) resting on seaweed, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
Leopard seal, Antarctica
1072-57 - Leopard seal, Antarctica
A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) resting on seaweed looking right at the camera, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
930-66 - A Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) resting on seaweed looking right at the camera, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
A dead Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) on a sandy beach, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
930-61 - A dead Grey Seal pup (Halichoerus grypus) on a sandy beach, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
Fighting between two Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) females over beach access, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
930-67 - Fighting between two Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) females over beach access, Pentland Firth, Scotland.
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-384 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) Alpha male vocalizing or bellowing. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-142 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) Alpha male vocalizing or bellowing. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) alpha male bull. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-148 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) alpha male bull. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) two females fighting. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-149 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) two females fighting. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-380 - government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) hauled out on a rock. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-133 - Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) hauled out on a rock. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Bearded Seal (Erignathus Barbatus) resting on sea ice. North Spitsbergen, Svalbard
909-34 - Bearded Seal (Erignathus Barbatus) resting on sea ice. North Spitsbergen, Svalbard
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) Alpha male bull mounting a female for mating, sunset. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-144 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) Alpha male bull mounting a female for mating, sunset. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups vocalizing. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-146 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups vocalizing. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, tagged young male, critically endangered, dead bait fish given by local fishermen, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-387 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, tagged young male, critically endangered, dead bait fish given by local fishermen, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pup nursing. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-141 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pup nursing. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) three pups trying  nurse at the same time. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-147 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) three pups trying nurse at the same time. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-385 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) mating. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-145 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) mating. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) female barking. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-143 - Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) female barking. San Simeon, National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-381 - government officials and locals keeping eyes on Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
983-386 - Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi, basking at boat ramp, young male, critically endangered, Honokohau Harbor, Kona Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, Pacific Ocean
Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) raft floating in the water dark medium and light morph. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
936-132 - Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) raft floating in the water dark medium and light morph. National marine sanctuary, Monterey bay, California Pacific ocean, USA.
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach asleep. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-374 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach asleep. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female in surf, head just above surface of water while watching young.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-345 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female in surf, head just above surface of water while watching young.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-347 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-356 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-359 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Common Seal (Phoca vitulina), two on rocks looking at each other tails up. Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-6 - Common Seal (Phoca vitulina), two on rocks looking at each other tails up. Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-364 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory on the beach . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-358 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory on the beach . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) in bed of seaweed on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-4 - Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) in bed of seaweed on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-366 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Bull Southern Elephant Seal, Mirounga leonina, South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean.
917-233 - Bull Southern Elephant Seal, Mirounga leonina, South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean.
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-370 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with wet fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-367 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female lying on rocks, head up looking with surf coming in round her. Slow shutter speed used showing movement of surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-369 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female lying on rocks, head up looking with surf coming in round her. Slow shutter speed used showing movement of surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Atlantic grey seals hauled out on Traeth Godi'r Coch, Wales, UK
915-597 - Atlantic grey seals hauled out on Traeth Godi'r Coch, Wales, UK
Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) resting on rock calmac ferry in background. Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-5 - Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) resting on rock calmac ferry in background. Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female half body shot with flipper up on rock while surveying pup. Female has wet fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-348 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female half body shot with flipper up on rock while surveying pup. Female has wet fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) resting on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-7 - Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) resting on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is scratching pups head to induce feeding.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-352 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is scratching pups head to induce feeding.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) in bed of seaweed on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-9 - Common Seal (Phoca vitulina) in bed of seaweed on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female fighting bull to protect her pup. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-375 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female fighting bull to protect her pup. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-360 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-351 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female with pup, female is nosing pup to reaffirm parent pup bond.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf waves crashing over head. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-368 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf waves crashing over head. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of ScotlandGrey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-373 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of ScotlandGrey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-365 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-350 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed and mouth open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-346 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes closed and mouth open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-372 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) wide angle shot with pup lying on rocky beach and mother in background watching. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with dry fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-353 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), female close up head shot with dry fur. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory while still in the surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-355 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus), two females fighting over territory while still in the surf.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus),close up of bull looking up framed by out of focus rocks and scratching face with fin.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-354 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus),close up of bull looking up framed by out of focus rocks and scratching face with fin.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up shot of pup feeding, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-361 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up shot of pup feeding, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-357 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) female in surf with backlit water breaking over seal. . Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-362 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-349 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) pup portrait head shot with eyes open, taken on rocky beach in the west coast of Scotland. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) head and body picture of female with dry fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-371 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) head and body picture of female with dry fur.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
Common Seal (Phoca vitulina), two in bed of seaweed on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-8 - Common Seal (Phoca vitulina), two in bed of seaweed on rocks. Argyll, Scotland, UK
Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression and a wave breaking over his head.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
995-363 - Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) close up head shot of bull with mouth open showing aggression and a wave breaking over his head.. Mull of Kintyre near Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland, UK
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3912 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4522 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4596 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4637 - Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9286 - Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years.  Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled  April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
979-8156 - Popeye the official harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, Washington State, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Popeye earned her name as a result of the cataract on her left eye. She has been seen regularly by local boaters for over 20 years and is often seen begging scraps from onlookers and fisherman who clean their catch at the dock. Popeye has successfully borne and weaned several pups over the years. Matthew Gray Palmer's sculpture "Popeye" was unveiled April 16, 2005 in Fairweather Waterfront Park. The statue honors the official seal of the Port of Friday Harbor.
Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
979-9287 - Pregnant female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) giving birth on the beach near the abandoned whaling station at Stromness Bay on South Georgia Island in the Southern Ocean. MORE INFO The southern elephant seal is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals including approximately 350,000 elephant seals in South Georgia.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4512 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".