Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6?8 m (20?26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection England
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Shot date: 13-11-2018

Upload date: 20-05-2019

This image is not model or property released

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Keywords:

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Image id: 

860-287264

Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6?8 m (20?26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection England

Paulo de Oliveira

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Paulo de Oliveira