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Adult Great Blue Heron (Andea herodias) among the mangrove roots in Magdalena Bay, Isla Magdalena, Baja California Sur, Mexico.
979-2642 - Adult Great Blue Heron (Andea herodias) among the mangrove roots in Magdalena Bay, Isla Magdalena, Baja California Sur, Mexico.
Adult Galapagos land snake (Philodryas spp) which is a mildly poisonous and a constrictor. MORE INFO: It's a small snake, at only a bit over three feet, but it can catch prey up to 4 or 5 feet long. It eats insects, lizards, small birds, and baby marine iguanas. Its coloration is brown with yellow stripes or dark gray with yellow spots. The origin of this snake, which is of the Colubrideae family and the Philodryas genus, is the Caribbean. There are actually eight different subspecies on the Galapagos Islands
979-6190 - Adult Galapagos land snake (Philodryas spp) which is a mildly poisonous and a constrictor. MORE INFO: It's a small snake, at only a bit over three feet, but it can catch prey up to 4 or 5 feet long. It eats insects, lizards, small birds, and baby marine iguanas. Its coloration is brown with yellow stripes or dark gray with yellow spots. The origin of this snake, which is of the Colubrideae family and the Philodryas genus, is the Caribbean. There are actually eight different subspecies on the Galapagos Islands
King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) breeding and nesting colonies on South Georgia Island, Southern Ocean.
979-4207 - King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) breeding and nesting colonies on South Georgia Island, Southern Ocean.
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
979-8691 - Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) adult and cub swimming. Monacobreen Glacier, Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. MORE INFO The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years."
A close-up view of Arctic lousewort (Pedicularis langsdorfii) in Svalbard, Norway. MORE INFO This plant is also sometimes known as wooly lousewort. Harsh Arctic conditions can only support a few varieties of plants, but the ones that do survive are true marvels of adaptability. These hardy plants must be able to withstand biting cold, long periods without light and the ravages of man and beast.
979-8148 - A close-up view of Arctic lousewort (Pedicularis langsdorfii) in Svalbard, Norway. MORE INFO This plant is also sometimes known as wooly lousewort. Harsh Arctic conditions can only support a few varieties of plants, but the ones that do survive are true marvels of adaptability. These hardy plants must be able to withstand biting cold, long periods without light and the ravages of man and beast.
The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
979-3912 - The Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the Southern Elephant Seal), and is near the top of the Antarctic food chain. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas are the only natural predators of leopard seals. Females are generally larger than the males. The bulls are generally 2.5 m (8.2 ft) to 3.2 m (10.5 ft) and weigh between 200 kg (441 lb) and 453.5 kg (1,000 lb), while cows are between 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and 3.4 meters (11.2 feet) in length and weigh between 225 kg (496 lb) and 591 kg (1,303 lb). In 2003, a leopard seal dragged a snorkeling biologist underwater to her death in what was identified as the first known human fatality from a leopard seal. However, numerous examples of aggressive behavior, stalking, and attacks on humans had been previously documented. The leopard seal has also been known to snap at people's feet through holes in the ice.
Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Every July salmon spawn in the river between Naknek Lake and Brooks Lake and brown bears congregate near the falls to catch and eat them as they swim upstream. A variety of feeding strategies are employed to catch the salmon including catching them in the air as they jump over the falls, wading in the shallow water for them, diving in deeper water for them, swatting them out of the water and onto the shore, pouncing on them in shallow water, and even stealing them from other bears who have caught them.
979-8514 - Adult brown bear (Ursus arctos) foraging for salmon at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Every July salmon spawn in the river between Naknek Lake and Brooks Lake and brown bears congregate near the falls to catch and eat them as they swim upstream. A variety of feeding strategies are employed to catch the salmon including catching them in the air as they jump over the falls, wading in the shallow water for them, diving in deeper water for them, swatting them out of the water and onto the shore, pouncing on them in shallow water, and even stealing them from other bears who have caught them.
Images from November 23, 2007 of the rescue of 154 people from the sinking expedition ship Explorer in Antarctica. All 154 people were in lifeboats and Zodiacs as of 3:00AM local time. Two rescue boats arrived on the scene at 6:30AM local time. The first was the Norwegian Cruise ship Nordnorge and the second was the Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Endeavour. All 154 people were safely transferred to the Nordnorge. These images are taken from the bow of the National Geographic Endeavour. The Explorer continued listing and taking on water, finally sinking later that day.
979-2448 - Images from November 23, 2007 of the rescue of 154 people from the sinking expedition ship Explorer in Antarctica. All 154 people were in lifeboats and Zodiacs as of 3:00AM local time. Two rescue boats arrived on the scene at 6:30AM local time. The first was the Norwegian Cruise ship Nordnorge and the second was the Lindblad Expeditions ship National Geographic Endeavour. All 154 people were safely transferred to the Nordnorge. These images are taken from the bow of the National Geographic Endeavour. The Explorer continued listing and taking on water, finally sinking later that day.
Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
979-4380 - Views of Deception Island, an island in the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula which has one of the safest harbours in Antarctica. A recently active volcano, its eruptions in 1967 and 1969 caused serious damage to the scientific stations there. The only current research bases are run by the Argentine Army and Spain. The island, located at 62857'S 60836'W, is approximately circular with a diameter of about 12 km (7 mi). Its highest point, Mt Pond, has an elevation of 542 m (1778 ft), and over half the island is covered by glaciers. The centre of the island is a caldera formed in a huge eruption which has been flooded by the sea to form a large bay named Port Foster, about 9 km (5.5 mi) long and 6 km (3.6 mi) wide. The bay has a narrow entrance, just 230 m (754 ft) wide, called Neptune's Bellows. Adding to the hazard is Ravn Rock, which lies 2.5 m (8 ft) below the water in the middle of the channel. Just inside Neptune's Bellows lies the cove Whalers' Bay, which is bordered by a large black sand beach. Since the early 19th century Deception Island was a favourite refuge from the storms and icebergs of Antarctica. It was first used by sealers, then in 1906 a Norwegian-Chilean whaling company started using Whalers' Bay as a base for a factory ship, the Gobernador Bories. Other whaling operations followed suit, and by 1914 there were 13 factory ships based there. On February 3, 1944 the British established a permanent base on Deception Island as part of Operation Tabarin, and occupied it until December 5, 1967, when a volcanic eruption forced a temporary withdrawal. It was used again between December 4, 1968 and February 23, 1969, when further volcanic activity caused it to be abandoned.
The endemic Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) feeding underwater in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. This is the only marine iguana in the world, with many of the main islands having it's own subspecies. Pacific Ocean. This iguana is unique among all iguanas worldwide to feed exclusively underwater on algae.
979-5435 - The endemic Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) feeding underwater in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. This is the only marine iguana in the world, with many of the main islands having it's own subspecies. Pacific Ocean. This iguana is unique among all iguanas worldwide to feed exclusively underwater on algae.
Ring of Brodgar, Orkney Islands, Scotland. MORE INFO This ring of standing stones was believed to have been built in 2,000 BC, before the time of the Great Pyramid. The circle originally had 60 stones arranged inside of a henge or ditch. Only 36 still stand, but it is still one of the largest Neolithic henges in Britain.
979-8900 - Ring of Brodgar, Orkney Islands, Scotland. MORE INFO This ring of standing stones was believed to have been built in 2,000 BC, before the time of the Great Pyramid. The circle originally had 60 stones arranged inside of a henge or ditch. Only 36 still stand, but it is still one of the largest Neolithic henges in Britain.
The Lindblad expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour operating with it's fleet of Zodiacs in and around the Antarctic peninsula, Antarctica.
979-2231 - The Lindblad expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour operating with it's fleet of Zodiacs in and around the Antarctic peninsula, Antarctica.
Aurora Borealis (Northern (Polar) Lights) over the boreal forest outside Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada, MORE INFO The term aurora borealis was coined by Pierre Gassendi in 1621 from the Roman goddess of dawn, Aurora, and the Greek name for north wind, Boreas. Auroras are the result of the emissions of photons in the Earth's upper atmosphere, above 80 km (50 miles), from ionized nitrogen atoms regaining an electron, and oxygen and nitrogen atoms returning from an excited state to ground state.
979-8239 - Aurora Borealis (Northern (Polar) Lights) over the boreal forest outside Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada, MORE INFO The term aurora borealis was coined by Pierre Gassendi in 1621 from the Roman goddess of dawn, Aurora, and the Greek name for north wind, Boreas. Auroras are the result of the emissions of photons in the Earth's upper atmosphere, above 80 km (50 miles), from ionized nitrogen atoms regaining an electron, and oxygen and nitrogen atoms returning from an excited state to ground state.
Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) leaping off an iceberg to return to the sea to feed on Devil Island near the Antarctic Peninsula.
979-1597 - Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) leaping off an iceberg to return to the sea to feed on Devil Island near the Antarctic Peninsula.
King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) swimming near the beach at breeding and nesting colony at Salisbury Plains in the Bay of Isles, South Georgia, Southern Ocean.
979-9376 - King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) swimming near the beach at breeding and nesting colony at Salisbury Plains in the Bay of Isles, South Georgia, Southern Ocean.
Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6881 - Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Adult Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) hunting fish underwater in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. This is the only species of penguin in the northern hemisphere and is endemic to the Galapagos Island archipeligo, Ecuador only.
979-6275 - Adult Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) hunting fish underwater in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. This is the only species of penguin in the northern hemisphere and is endemic to the Galapagos Island archipeligo, Ecuador only.
Excited whale watchers reach out to kiss a California Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus) in San Ignacio Lagoon on the Pacific side of the Baja Peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Each winter thousands of California gray whales migrate from the Bering and Chuckchi seas to breed and calf in the warm water lagoons of Baja California. San Ignacio lagoon is the smallest of the three major such lagoons. Current (2008) population estimates put the California Gray Whale at between 20,000 and 24,000 animals.
979-3760 - Excited whale watchers reach out to kiss a California Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus) in San Ignacio Lagoon on the Pacific side of the Baja Peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Each winter thousands of California gray whales migrate from the Bering and Chuckchi seas to breed and calf in the warm water lagoons of Baja California. San Ignacio lagoon is the smallest of the three major such lagoons. Current (2008) population estimates put the California Gray Whale at between 20,000 and 24,000 animals.
Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas) eye and head detail. Mexican panga fishery in Santa Rosalia, Baja, Mexico. This fishery catches 100 metric tons of squid on average each night. The fishery runs between April and November. Average price paid for cleaned squid is less than 10 U.S. cents per pound.
979-2136 - Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas) eye and head detail. Mexican panga fishery in Santa Rosalia, Baja, Mexico. This fishery catches 100 metric tons of squid on average each night. The fishery runs between April and November. Average price paid for cleaned squid is less than 10 U.S. cents per pound.
Adult California Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus) surfacing (eye detail) in San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja, Mexico.
979-427 - Adult California Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus) surfacing (eye detail) in San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja, Mexico.
Aerial view of adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) preparing to dive in order to cooperatively "bubble-net" feed in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Note the expanded ventral pleats as well as the baleen hanging from the upper jaws.
979-604 - Aerial view of adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) preparing to dive in order to cooperatively "bubble-net" feed in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Note the expanded ventral pleats as well as the baleen hanging from the upper jaws.
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) underwater in the AuAu Channel between the islands of Maui and Lanai, Hawaii, USA. Each year humpback whales return to these waters in the winter and spring to mate and give birth to their calves. In the summer and fall they swim thousands of miles to their feeding grounds in the Pacific Northwes areas of British Columbia, Canada and Alaska, USA.
979-9653 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) underwater in the AuAu Channel between the islands of Maui and Lanai, Hawaii, USA. Each year humpback whales return to these waters in the winter and spring to mate and give birth to their calves. In the summer and fall they swim thousands of miles to their feeding grounds in the Pacific Northwes areas of British Columbia, Canada and Alaska, USA.
White-tipped reef shark (Triaenodon obesus) underwater in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Pacific Ocean.
979-3573 - White-tipped reef shark (Triaenodon obesus) underwater in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Pacific Ocean.
Newborn southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at President Head on Snow Island in the South Shetland Island Group, Antarctica. Newborns exhibit a dark brown "lanugo" coat for about three weeks, which is then replaced by a silver-grey coat. This species is the largest pinniped in the world, with males attaining lengths of 6.5 m and a weight of 3,700 kg. A remarkable diver, recorded to depths of 1444 meters and almost 2 hour dives underwater.
979-1140 - Newborn southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at President Head on Snow Island in the South Shetland Island Group, Antarctica. Newborns exhibit a dark brown "lanugo" coat for about three weeks, which is then replaced by a silver-grey coat. This species is the largest pinniped in the world, with males attaining lengths of 6.5 m and a weight of 3,700 kg. A remarkable diver, recorded to depths of 1444 meters and almost 2 hour dives underwater.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin pod (Stenella longirostris) underwater in Honolua Bay off the northwest coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. Their greatest population density occurs between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific.
979-7962 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin pod (Stenella longirostris) underwater in Honolua Bay off the northwest coast of Maui, Hawaii, USA. Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. Their greatest population density occurs between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific.
Blue Shark, Prionace glauca, off San Clemente Island, California
979-1285 - Blue Shark, Prionace glauca, off San Clemente Island, California
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the AuAu Channel between the islands of Maui and Lanai, Hawaii, USA. Each year humpback whales return to these waters in the winter and spring to mate and give birth to their calves. In the summer and fall they swim thousands of miles to their feeding grounds in the Pacific Northwes areas of British Columbia, Canada and Alaska, USA.
979-9621 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the AuAu Channel between the islands of Maui and Lanai, Hawaii, USA. Each year humpback whales return to these waters in the winter and spring to mate and give birth to their calves. In the summer and fall they swim thousands of miles to their feeding grounds in the Pacific Northwes areas of British Columbia, Canada and Alaska, USA.
Chinstrap penguin pair (Pygoscelis antarctica) at colony on Bailey Head on Deception Island in the South Shetland Islands near the Antarctic Peninsula. There are an estimated over 2 million breeding pairs of chinstrap penguins in the Antarctic peninsula region alone, perhaps as many as 7.5 million breeding pairs in all of Antarctica.
979-1667 - Chinstrap penguin pair (Pygoscelis antarctica) at colony on Bailey Head on Deception Island in the South Shetland Islands near the Antarctic Peninsula. There are an estimated over 2 million breeding pairs of chinstrap penguins in the Antarctic peninsula region alone, perhaps as many as 7.5 million breeding pairs in all of Antarctica.
California Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus) underwater in San Ignacio Lagoon on the Pacific side of the Baja Peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: Each winter thousands of California gray whales migrate from the Bering and Chuckchi seas to breed and calf in the warm water lagoons of Baja California. San Ignacio lagoon is the smallest of the three major such lagoons. Current (2008) population estimates put the California Gray Whale at between 20,000 and 24,000 animals.
979-5725 - California Gray Whale (Eschrichtius robustus) underwater in San Ignacio Lagoon on the Pacific side of the Baja Peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico. MORE INFO: Each winter thousands of California gray whales migrate from the Bering and Chuckchi seas to breed and calf in the warm water lagoons of Baja California. San Ignacio lagoon is the smallest of the three major such lagoons. Current (2008) population estimates put the California Gray Whale at between 20,000 and 24,000 animals.
Sub-adult Humpback Whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, surface lunge-feeding on krill in northern Gulf of California, Mexico
979-462 - Sub-adult Humpback Whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, surface lunge-feeding on krill in northern Gulf of California, Mexico
Adult Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) surfacing (note tears in flukes) in the upper Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
979-352 - Adult Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) surfacing (note tears in flukes) in the upper Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
Scenic views of open tundra in the Svalbard Archipelago of Norway.
979-8235 - Scenic views of open tundra in the Svalbard Archipelago of Norway.
A group of adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) co-operatively "bubble-net" feeding along the west side of Chatham Strait in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Shown here is an adult tail-throwing after a bubble-net set.
979-787 - A group of adult humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) co-operatively "bubble-net" feeding along the west side of Chatham Strait in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. Shown here is an adult tail-throwing after a bubble-net set.
Elegant terns (Sterna elegans) nesting on tiny and remote Isla Rasa in the middle Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Norte, Mexico. About 95% of the world's population of elegant terns nest on this tiny island, 2007 population estimates show about 200,000 nesting pairs here.
979-3504 - Elegant terns (Sterna elegans) nesting on tiny and remote Isla Rasa in the middle Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Norte, Mexico. About 95% of the world's population of elegant terns nest on this tiny island, 2007 population estimates show about 200,000 nesting pairs here.
A pod of 40 to 50 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) encountered southwest of Isla San Pedro Martir in the midriff region of the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Norte, Mexico. Pilot whales exhibit striking sexual dimorphism, with adult bulls being longer, developing a more pronounced melon, and a much larger dorsal fin than females.
979-3341 - A pod of 40 to 50 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) encountered southwest of Isla San Pedro Martir in the midriff region of the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Baja California Norte, Mexico. Pilot whales exhibit striking sexual dimorphism, with adult bulls being longer, developing a more pronounced melon, and a much larger dorsal fin than females.
Adult kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) foraging for small crustaceans in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the only gull regularly found in the Antarctic Peninsula to a latitude of 68 degrees south.
979-7920 - Adult kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) foraging for small crustaceans in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO This is the only gull regularly found in the Antarctic Peninsula to a latitude of 68 degrees south.
Heermann's Gull (Larus heermanni) mating ritual on their breeding grounds on Isla Rasa in the middle Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico. 95% of the world's population of this species nests on this tiny island.
979-1940 - Heermann's Gull (Larus heermanni) mating ritual on their breeding grounds on Isla Rasa in the middle Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico. 95% of the world's population of this species nests on this tiny island.
Adult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)  sub-surface feeding among black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) off the continental shelf west of Spitsbergen in the Barents Sea, Norway. Humpbacks are one of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). There are at least 80,000 humpback whales worldwide.
979-5155 - Adult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) sub-surface feeding among black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) off the continental shelf west of Spitsbergen in the Barents Sea, Norway. Humpbacks are one of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12?16 metres (40?50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). There are at least 80,000 humpback whales worldwide.
Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
979-4522 - Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) swimming along or hauled out on fast ice floe in Bourgeois Fjord (67840'S 6785'W) near the Antarctic Peninsula. The Crabeater Seal, at a population of 25 to 50 million is perhaps the second most numerous large species of mammals on Earth, after humans. More than one in every two seals in the world is a Crabeater Seal and the population biomass of Crabeaters is about four times that of all other pinnipeds put together. It is also one of the fastest seals; a crabeater seal can swim 16 mph. Males grow to about 2.2 m to about 2.6 m (7.26 to 8.6 ft) and weigh roughly between 200 and 300 kg (440 to 660 lbs). Females grow up to 3.6 m (142 in) in length and 500 lb (230 kg) in weight. Pups are born about 1.2 metres in length and weigh between 20 and 30 kilograms. While nursing, pups grow at a rate of about 4.2 kilograms a day. They are weaned after 2-3 weeks. Despite its name, its diet does not include crabs. Instead, a crabeater seal's unusual multilobed teeth enable this species to sieve krill from the water. Its dentition looks like a perfect strainer, but how it operates in detail is still unknown. 98% of the Crabeater Seal's food consists of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. The seals consume over 80 million tons of krill each year. Explorer and naturalist E.A. Wilson, who accompanied British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on the 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, recorded that the Crabeater seal will, when close to death, leave the pack and travel far up glaciers to die. He observed Crabeater carcasses on a number of occasions, "thirty miles from the seashore and 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea-level".
Staff (shown here is National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore) from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. MORE INFO Lindblad Expeditions has been active in the Galapagos since the 1990's and has raised several million dollars towards conservation and education in the Galapagos.
979-9502 - Staff (shown here is National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore) from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Endeavour in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. MORE INFO Lindblad Expeditions has been active in the Galapagos since the 1990's and has raised several million dollars towards conservation and education in the Galapagos.
Flightseeing in Denali National Park with Sheldon Air starting in Talkeetna and approaching Mt. McKinley from the south in the Alaska Range, Denali National Park, Alaska. MORE INFO Talkeetna has become the starting point for most climbing expeditions to attempt the summit on Mt. McKinley. Climbers are flown to base camp and landed on a glacier there to begin their attempt to the summit.
979-8476 - Flightseeing in Denali National Park with Sheldon Air starting in Talkeetna and approaching Mt. McKinley from the south in the Alaska Range, Denali National Park, Alaska. MORE INFO Talkeetna has become the starting point for most climbing expeditions to attempt the summit on Mt. McKinley. Climbers are flown to base camp and landed on a glacier there to begin their attempt to the summit.
Adult green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the protected marine sanctuary at Honolua Bay on the northwest side of the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA. The range of this species extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. They are green because of their fat underneath their shell (carapace). As a species recognized as endangered by the IUCN and CITES, Chelonia mydas is protected from exploitation in most countries worldwide. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill individual turtles in the Hawaiian Islands. A fairly recent phenomenon recorded in Hawaii's population of green sea turtles as well as in populations off the coast of Florida is the presence of a disease called fibropapilloma. Fibropapilloma causes the growth of large bulbous tumors predominantly on the soft tissues of the turtles. Once turtles are stricken with the disease they do not appear to recover. The tumors often spread to many parts of the body, ultimately killing the turtles.
979-3173 - Adult green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the protected marine sanctuary at Honolua Bay on the northwest side of the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA. The range of this species extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. They are green because of their fat underneath their shell (carapace). As a species recognized as endangered by the IUCN and CITES, Chelonia mydas is protected from exploitation in most countries worldwide. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill individual turtles in the Hawaiian Islands. A fairly recent phenomenon recorded in Hawaii's population of green sea turtles as well as in populations off the coast of Florida is the presence of a disease called fibropapilloma. Fibropapilloma causes the growth of large bulbous tumors predominantly on the soft tissues of the turtles. Once turtles are stricken with the disease they do not appear to recover. The tumors often spread to many parts of the body, ultimately killing the turtles.
Sunset on Chichagof Island from Peril Strait, Southeast Alaska in the springtime, USA, Pacific Ocean.
979-3060 - Sunset on Chichagof Island from Peril Strait, Southeast Alaska in the springtime, USA, Pacific Ocean.
Blow hole spouting on Espanola Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Pacific Ocean.
979-5835 - Blow hole spouting on Espanola Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Pacific Ocean.
Adult Black-browed albatross (Thalassarche melanophrys) on the wing in the Drake Passage between South America and Antarctica, Southern Ocean. The Black-browed Albatross is a large seabird of the albatross family Diomedeidae. It is an endangered species on the IUCN Red List, but is the most widespread and common albatross. The Black-browed Albatross is a medium-sized albatross, at 80-95 cm (32-38 in) long with a 200-235 cm (79-93 in) wingspan and an average weight of 3.7 kg (8.2 lbs). They can have a natural lifespan of over 70 years.
979-5010 - Adult Black-browed albatross (Thalassarche melanophrys) on the wing in the Drake Passage between South America and Antarctica, Southern Ocean. The Black-browed Albatross is a large seabird of the albatross family Diomedeidae. It is an endangered species on the IUCN Red List, but is the most widespread and common albatross. The Black-browed Albatross is a medium-sized albatross, at 80-95 cm (32-38 in) long with a 200-235 cm (79-93 in) wingspan and an average weight of 3.7 kg (8.2 lbs). They can have a natural lifespan of over 70 years.
Adult Imperial Shag (Phalacrocorax (atriceps) atriceps) from breeding colony on offshore islets in the Beagle Channel.coastal southern Chile and Argentina. The Imperial Shag is a black and white cormorant native to many subantarctic islands, the Antarctic Peninsula and southern South America, primarily in rocky coastal regions, but locally also at large inland lakes. It is sometimes placed in the genus Leucocarbo instead. It is also known as the Blue-eyed Shag and by many other names, and is one of a larger group of cormorants called blue-eyed shags. The taxonomy is very complex, and several subspecies are often considered separate species instead.
979-7118 - Adult Imperial Shag (Phalacrocorax (atriceps) atriceps) from breeding colony on offshore islets in the Beagle Channel.coastal southern Chile and Argentina. The Imperial Shag is a black and white cormorant native to many subantarctic islands, the Antarctic Peninsula and southern South America, primarily in rocky coastal regions, but locally also at large inland lakes. It is sometimes placed in the genus Leucocarbo instead. It is also known as the Blue-eyed Shag and by many other names, and is one of a larger group of cormorants called blue-eyed shags. The taxonomy is very complex, and several subspecies are often considered separate species instead.
Cactus in bloom in the Sonoran Desert of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico.
979-5482 - Cactus in bloom in the Sonoran Desert of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico.
Adult Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) eating a pufferfish in the lower Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
979-1934 - Adult Yellow-footed Gull (Larus livens) eating a pufferfish in the lower Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
Captive Galapagos giant tortoise (Geochelone elephantopus) being fed at the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. The Galapagos Giant Tortoise is endemic only to the Galapagos Islands. There are currently 11 survivng races and 3 extinct races.
979-3281 - Captive Galapagos giant tortoise (Geochelone elephantopus) being fed at the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. The Galapagos Giant Tortoise is endemic only to the Galapagos Islands. There are currently 11 survivng races and 3 extinct races.
Adult Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) hunting fish underwater in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. This is the only species of penguin in the northern hemisphere and is endemic to the Galapagos Island archipeligo, Ecuador only.
979-6245 - Adult Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) hunting fish underwater in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. This is the only species of penguin in the northern hemisphere and is endemic to the Galapagos Island archipeligo, Ecuador only.
Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) on navigational buoy just outside Petersburg in Southeastern Alaska, USA. MORE INFO: This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
979-6987 - Northern (Steller) sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) on navigational buoy just outside Petersburg in Southeastern Alaska, USA. MORE INFO: This is the second largest of all pinnipeds in North America, with males reaching a length of over 10 feet and 2,000 pounds while the females are much smaller at about 7 feet and 700 pounds.
An adult Brown Skua (Catharacta antarctica)  in the Antarctic peninsula in the southern ocean. This skua is often referred to as Antarctic Skua (or vice versa); the taxonomy of Skuas is still a matter of dispute. Other names (probably owing to the high level of hybridization in this species) include Southern Great Skua, Southern Skua or Subantarctic Skua.
979-4298 - An adult Brown Skua (Catharacta antarctica) in the Antarctic peninsula in the southern ocean. This skua is often referred to as Antarctic Skua (or vice versa); the taxonomy of Skuas is still a matter of dispute. Other names (probably owing to the high level of hybridization in this species) include Southern Great Skua, Southern Skua or Subantarctic Skua.
The Espanola mockingbird (Nesomimus macdonaldi) on the beach at Punta Suarez on Espanola Island in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. This endemic species of mockingbird is only found on Espanola Island. Pacific Ocean.
979-3426 - The Espanola mockingbird (Nesomimus macdonaldi) on the beach at Punta Suarez on Espanola Island in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. This endemic species of mockingbird is only found on Espanola Island. Pacific Ocean.
Sunset across the AuAu Channel between Maui and Lanai, looking west with Lanai in the background. Maui, Hawaii, USA.
979-2586 - Sunset across the AuAu Channel between Maui and Lanai, looking west with Lanai in the background. Maui, Hawaii, USA.
Adult green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the protected marine sanctuary at Honolua Bay on the northwest side of the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA. MORE INFO The range of this species extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. They are green because of their fat underneath their shell (carapace). As a species recognized as endangered by the IUCN and CITES, Chelonia mydas is protected from exploitation in most countries worldwide. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill individual turtles in the Hawaiian Islands.
979-7831 - Adult green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the protected marine sanctuary at Honolua Bay on the northwest side of the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA. MORE INFO The range of this species extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. They are green because of their fat underneath their shell (carapace). As a species recognized as endangered by the IUCN and CITES, Chelonia mydas is protected from exploitation in most countries worldwide. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill individual turtles in the Hawaiian Islands.
Kayaking in the slough in the small town of Petersburg in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
979-6657 - Kayaking in the slough in the small town of Petersburg in Southeast Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. No model or property release available for this photograph.
Coastal Brown Bear (Ursus arctos horibilis) mother with cubs foraging at low tide in Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska, USA.
979-1027 - Coastal Brown Bear (Ursus arctos horibilis) mother with cubs foraging at low tide in Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska, USA.
Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning, possibly to dislodge attached remoras, off the coast of Lanai, Hawaii, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific.
979-8451 - Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) spinning, possibly to dislodge attached remoras, off the coast of Lanai, Hawaii, USA, Pacific Ocean. MORE INFO Spinner Dolphins occur in pelagic tropical waters in all the world's major oceans. Although they mainly live in the open ocean, they are sometimes found near the shores of tropical island chains such as in the waters off Hawaii. The total population is unknown, but was certainly dramatically reduced by fishing activity in the eastern Pacific. This species is still regarded as endangered in the eastern Pacific.
Adult male walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) hauled out on the beach at Poolepynten in Prins Karls Forland in the Svalbard Archipelago in the Barents Sea, Norway. While isolated Atlantic males can weigh as much as 4,000 lb, most weigh between 1,500 and 3,500 lb. Females weigh about two thirds as much as males. The most prominent physical feature of the walrus is its long tusks, actually elongated canines, which are present in both sexes and can reach a length of over 3 ft and weigh up to 12 lb.
979-5231 - Adult male walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) hauled out on the beach at Poolepynten in Prins Karls Forland in the Svalbard Archipelago in the Barents Sea, Norway. While isolated Atlantic males can weigh as much as 4,000 lb, most weigh between 1,500 and 3,500 lb. Females weigh about two thirds as much as males. The most prominent physical feature of the walrus is its long tusks, actually elongated canines, which are present in both sexes and can reach a length of over 3 ft and weigh up to 12 lb.
A very rare sighting of a lone adult king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) among breeding and nesting colonies of both gentoo and chinstrap penguins on Barrentos Island in the Aitcho Island Group, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. King penguins are rarely found below 60 degrees south, and almost never on the Antarctic Peninsula. This lone adult is most likely from the island of South Georgia, almost 900 miles away from where it is now. It most likely was out foraging and stopped here on Barrentos to rest.
979-1467 - A very rare sighting of a lone adult king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) among breeding and nesting colonies of both gentoo and chinstrap penguins on Barrentos Island in the Aitcho Island Group, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. King penguins are rarely found below 60 degrees south, and almost never on the Antarctic Peninsula. This lone adult is most likely from the island of South Georgia, almost 900 miles away from where it is now. It most likely was out foraging and stopped here on Barrentos to rest.
Adult southern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) on the wing in the Drake passage between the tip of South America and Antarctica. Southern Ocean.
979-1733 - Adult southern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) on the wing in the Drake passage between the tip of South America and Antarctica. Southern Ocean.
Calved icebergs from the glaciers at Blomstrandhalvîya in Kongsfjord on the western side of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway.
979-8071 - Calved icebergs from the glaciers at Blomstrandhalvîya in Kongsfjord on the western side of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway.
Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica.
979-4838 - Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica.
Swallow-tailed gull (Creagrus furcatus) in flight in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. Pacific Ocean. This species of gull is endemic to the Galapagos Islands. It is also a nocturnal feeding gull (note the red ring around the eye).
979-1949 - Swallow-tailed gull (Creagrus furcatus) in flight in the Galapagos Island Group, Ecuador. Pacific Ocean. This species of gull is endemic to the Galapagos Islands. It is also a nocturnal feeding gull (note the red ring around the eye).
Adult emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) on sea ice near Snow Hill Island in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.
979-7210 - Adult emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) on sea ice near Snow Hill Island in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.
Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Point Wild on Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
979-4952 - Heavy storm clouds and ice choked waters surround Point Wild on Elephant Island. Elephant Island is an ice-covered, mountainous island off the coast of Antarctica in the outer reaches of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean. It lies 1,290 kilometres (800 mi) west-southwest of South Georgia, 940 kilometres (580 mi) south of the Falkland Islands, and 890 kilometres (550 mi) southeast of Cape Horn. It is within the Antarctic claims of Argentina, Chile and the UK. Point Wild is named after Frank Wild, who served as Shackleton's second-in-command on Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1916). As second-in-command, Wild was left in charge of 21 men on desolate Elephant Island as Shackleton and a crew of 5 made their epic rescue mission to South Georgia aboard a lifeboat. From 24 April to 30 August 1916 Wild and his crew waited on Elephant Island, surviving on a diet of seal, penguin and seaweed. On the point is a monument dedicated to the Chilean captain Luis Pardo who rescued Wild and his men on August 30, 1916 in the Chilean vessel Yelcho. Elephant Island?s name can be attributed to both its elephant head-like appearance and the sighting of elephant seals by Captain George Powell in 1821, one of the earliest sightings of the island. Its weather is normally foggy with much snow. Additionally, winds can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour on the frigid island.
Lamplugh Glacier showing meltwater cave, Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA.
979-2533 - Lamplugh Glacier showing meltwater cave, Glacier Bay National Park, southeast Alaska, USA.
Adult West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus) belly-up in Homosassa Springs, Florida, USA.
979-851 - Adult West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus) belly-up in Homosassa Springs, Florida, USA.
The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer doing various things in and around the Svalbard Archipelago in the summer months. Lindblad Expeditions has run expeditions to Svalbard since the 1980's and remains one of the premier Arctic Expedition providers to this very day. No property or model releases are available for this image.
979-5163 - The Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer doing various things in and around the Svalbard Archipelago in the summer months. Lindblad Expeditions has run expeditions to Svalbard since the 1980's and remains one of the premier Arctic Expedition providers to this very day. No property or model releases are available for this image.
Adult Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) surfacing in the lower Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
979-810 - Adult Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) surfacing in the lower Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
979-6944 - Brown bear (Ursus arctos) at the Brooks River in Katmai National Park near Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA. Pacific Ocean. The normal range of physical dimensions for a brown bear is a head-and-body length of 1.7 to 2.8 m (5.6 to 9.2 feet) and a shoulder height 90 to 150 cm (35 to 60 inches). Males are 38-50% larger than females. It is not unusual for large male Kodiak Bears to stand over 3 m (10 feet) while on their hind legs and to weigh about 680 kg (1,500 lb). The largest wild Kodiak bear on record weighed over 1,100 kilograms (2,500 pounds). There are about 200,000 brown bears in the world, with 32,500 in the United States. 95% of the brown bear population in the United States live in Alaska.
Galapagos fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) playing in the surf on Isabela Island in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. This small pinniped is endemic to the Galapagos Islands only. Pacific Ocean.
979-5460 - Galapagos fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) playing in the surf on Isabela Island in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. This small pinniped is endemic to the Galapagos Islands only. Pacific Ocean.
A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5389 - A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edge¯ya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
Adult black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) in flight in fog on the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
979-1927 - Adult black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) in flight in fog on the Svalbard Archipelago, Barents Sea, Norway.
Lava lizard (Microlophus spp) in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Many of the islands within the Galapagos Island Archipeligo have their own endemic species.
979-5996 - Lava lizard (Microlophus spp) in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. Many of the islands within the Galapagos Island Archipeligo have their own endemic species.
Sunrise or sunset at sea in the Atlantic Ocean from onboard the National Geographic Endeavour crossing the Atlantic Ocean from Lisbon, Portugal to Salvador, Brazil.
979-6807 - Sunrise or sunset at sea in the Atlantic Ocean from onboard the National Geographic Endeavour crossing the Atlantic Ocean from Lisbon, Portugal to Salvador, Brazil.
Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) and Northern Giant Petrel (Macronectes halli) tearing apart an Antarctic fur seal pup in the water at Grytviken on South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The giant petrels are two large seabirds from the genus Macronectes, with overlap of distribution here on South Georgia. Long considered to be conspecific (they were not established as separate species until 1966), the two species, the Southern Giant Petrel (M. giganteus) and Northern Giant Petrel (M. halli) are the largest members of the petrel family, Procellariidae, and considered, with the two fulmars to form a distinct sub-group within the petrels. Both species are restricted to the southern hemisphere, and though the ranges overlap greatly, notably in South Georgia, the Southern Giant Petrel nests further south, with colonies on Antarctica. Giant petrels are aggressive predators and scavengers, which has led to the other common name they were known as, the Stinker, and the whalers used to call them gluttons. The Southern Giant Petrel is slightly larger at 3.8-8 kg (8.4-17.6 lbs), 180-210 cm (71-83 in) across the wings and 86-100 cm (33-40 in). They superficially resemble the albatross, and are the only procellarids who can equal them in size.
979-3951 - Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) and Northern Giant Petrel (Macronectes halli) tearing apart an Antarctic fur seal pup in the water at Grytviken on South Georgia, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The giant petrels are two large seabirds from the genus Macronectes, with overlap of distribution here on South Georgia. Long considered to be conspecific (they were not established as separate species until 1966), the two species, the Southern Giant Petrel (M. giganteus) and Northern Giant Petrel (M. halli) are the largest members of the petrel family, Procellariidae, and considered, with the two fulmars to form a distinct sub-group within the petrels. Both species are restricted to the southern hemisphere, and though the ranges overlap greatly, notably in South Georgia, the Southern Giant Petrel nests further south, with colonies on Antarctica. Giant petrels are aggressive predators and scavengers, which has led to the other common name they were known as, the Stinker, and the whalers used to call them gluttons. The Southern Giant Petrel is slightly larger at 3.8-8 kg (8.4-17.6 lbs), 180-210 cm (71-83 in) across the wings and 86-100 cm (33-40 in). They superficially resemble the albatross, and are the only procellarids who can equal them in size.
Margorie Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean.
979-8034 - Margorie Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska, USA, Pacific Ocean.
The waxing moon over the Baja Peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico.
979-5945 - The waxing moon over the Baja Peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico.
King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) breeding and nesting colonies on South Georgia Island, Southern Ocean.
979-3837 - King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) breeding and nesting colonies on South Georgia Island, Southern Ocean.
Adult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) breaching in front of the Hyatt Resort on Ka'anapali Beach in the AuAu Channel, Maui, Hawaii. Pacific Ocean.
979-676 - Adult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) breaching in front of the Hyatt Resort on Ka'anapali Beach in the AuAu Channel, Maui, Hawaii. Pacific Ocean.
Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) flukes-up dive near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO  Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpback whale populations in Antarctica are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts.
979-7531 - Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) flukes-up dive near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpback whale populations in Antarctica are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts.
Madeira, Portugal
979-6634 - Madeira, Portugal
Mother and pup California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus) hauled out among Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) on Isla San Pedro Martir in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
979-1221 - Mother and pup California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus) hauled out among Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) on Isla San Pedro Martir in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
Water melting from the Briksdalsbreen glacier south of the small town of Olden in coastal Norway. MORE INFO Olden is a village and urban area in the municipality of Stryn in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The population (2009) of Olden is 480.
979-8832 - Water melting from the Briksdalsbreen glacier south of the small town of Olden in coastal Norway. MORE INFO Olden is a village and urban area in the municipality of Stryn in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The population (2009) of Olden is 480.
Guests from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer kayaking near Monaco Glacier on Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago in the summer months. No property or model releases available for this image.
979-5136 - Guests from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer kayaking near Monaco Glacier on Spitsbergen Island in the Svalbard Archipelago in the summer months. No property or model releases available for this image.
The endemic Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) "sneezing" salt water in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. MORE INFO: This is the only marine iguana in the world, with many of the main islands having it's own subspecies. Pacific Ocean. This iguana is unique among all iguanas worldwide to feed exclusively underwater on algae.
979-5430 - The endemic Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) "sneezing" salt water in the Galapagos Island Archipeligo, Ecuador. MORE INFO: This is the only marine iguana in the world, with many of the main islands having it's own subspecies. Pacific Ocean. This iguana is unique among all iguanas worldwide to feed exclusively underwater on algae.
Adult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surface lunge-feeding on krill near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO  Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpback whale populations in Antarctica are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts.
979-7528 - Adult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) surface lunge-feeding on krill near the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, Southern Ocean. MORE INFO Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpback whale populations in Antarctica are severely depleated from over fishing during the 20th century modern era whaling efforts.
The National Geographic Endeavour pushing through brash ice and small icebergs in the Lemaire Channel near the Antarctic Peninsula.
979-2346 - The National Geographic Endeavour pushing through brash ice and small icebergs in the Lemaire Channel near the Antarctic Peninsula.
Wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) on the wing at sunset approaching South Georgia Island, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Wandering Albatross has the largest wingspan of any living bird, with the average wingspan being 3.1 metres (10.2 ft). The longest-winged examples verified have been about 3.7 m (12 ft), but probably erroneous reports of as much as 5.3 m (17.5 ft) are known. As a result of its wingspan, it is capable of remaining in the air without beating its wings for several hours at a time (travelling 22 metres for every meter of drop). The length of the body is about 1.35 m (4.4 ft) with females being slightly smaller than males, and they weigh typically from 6 to 12 kg (13-26 lb). Immature birds have been recorded weighing as much as 16.1 kg (35 lb) during their first flights. The plumage varies with age, but adults have white bodies with black and white wings. Males have whiter wings than females with just the tips and trailing edges of the wings black. They feed on squid, small fish and on animal refuse that floats on the sea, eating to such excess at times that they are unable to fly and rest helplessly on the water.
979-7080 - Wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) on the wing at sunset approaching South Georgia Island, Southern Atlantic Ocean. The Wandering Albatross has the largest wingspan of any living bird, with the average wingspan being 3.1 metres (10.2 ft). The longest-winged examples verified have been about 3.7 m (12 ft), but probably erroneous reports of as much as 5.3 m (17.5 ft) are known. As a result of its wingspan, it is capable of remaining in the air without beating its wings for several hours at a time (travelling 22 metres for every meter of drop). The length of the body is about 1.35 m (4.4 ft) with females being slightly smaller than males, and they weigh typically from 6 to 12 kg (13-26 lb). Immature birds have been recorded weighing as much as 16.1 kg (35 lb) during their first flights. The plumage varies with age, but adults have white bodies with black and white wings. Males have whiter wings than females with just the tips and trailing edges of the wings black. They feed on squid, small fish and on animal refuse that floats on the sea, eating to such excess at times that they are unable to fly and rest helplessly on the water.
A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
979-5385 - A curious adult polar bear (Ursus maritimus) approaches the National Geographic Explorer in the Barents Sea off the eastern coast of Edgeøya (Edge Island) in the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. The IUCN now lists global warming as the most significant threat to the polar bear, primarily because the melting of its sea ice habitat reduces its ability to find sufficient food. The IUCN states, "If climatic trends continue polar bears may become extirpated from most of their range within 100 years." On May 14, 2008, the United States Department of the Interior listed the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.
California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) underwater at Los Islotes (the islets) just outside of La Paz, Baja California Sur in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
979-6379 - California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) underwater at Los Islotes (the islets) just outside of La Paz, Baja California Sur in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez), Mexico.
NAtural history staff from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer doing various things in and around the Antarctic Peninsula in the summer months. Lindblad Expeditions pioneered Antarctic travel in 1969 and remains one of the premier Antarctic Expedition providers to this very day. No property or model releases are available for this image.
979-4700 - NAtural history staff from the Lindblad Expedition ship National Geographic Explorer doing various things in and around the Antarctic Peninsula in the summer months. Lindblad Expeditions pioneered Antarctic travel in 1969 and remains one of the premier Antarctic Expedition providers to this very day. No property or model releases are available for this image.
Adult emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) on sea ice near Snow Hill Island in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.
979-7303 - Adult emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) on sea ice near Snow Hill Island in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.
Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
979-4596 - Weddell Seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) hauled out on ice near the Antarctic Peninsula, southern Ocean. This is the most southerly breeding seal in the world, south to 78 degrees south, inhabiting both pack and fast ice. A weddell seal can grow 2.8 metres (9 ft 2 in) long and weigh between 400 to 600 kg (880 to 1,300 lb). It is estimated that there are approximately 800,000 individuals today. It is named after Sir James Weddell, commander of British sealing expeditions in the Weddell Sea. It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes. Recorded dive depths to 750 m for 73 minutes. On average, the Weddell Seal lives for 20 years, compared to an average life expectancy of 40 years for most other seals. This is because the Weddell Seal winters under the Antarctic sea ice adjacent to continental Antarctica where it must constantly maintain breathing holes by scraping the ice with its teeth. This has the effect of wearing down its teeth over time. Once a Weddell Seal's teeth have worn down to a certain level, the seal is unable to eat and eventually starves to death. The Weddell Seal lives further south than any other mammal, inhabiting the waters of McMurdo Sound, 1,300 km (810 mi) from the South Pole. The Weddell Seal is protected by the Antarctic Treaty and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Seals.
Curious Beluga mother and calf (Delphinapterus leucas) approach underwater (blowing bubbles) in the Churchill River, Hudson Bay, Manitoba, Canada.
979-332 - Curious Beluga mother and calf (Delphinapterus leucas) approach underwater (blowing bubbles) in the Churchill River, Hudson Bay, Manitoba, Canada.
Lindblad guests walking along the beach in Whalers Bay in Port Foster inside the caldera of Deception Island, south Shetland Islands, Antarctica. This Norwegian whaling station was began in 1904 and abandoned in 1931.
979-2381 - Lindblad guests walking along the beach in Whalers Bay in Port Foster inside the caldera of Deception Island, south Shetland Islands, Antarctica. This Norwegian whaling station was began in 1904 and abandoned in 1931.
Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
979-4637 - Young southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on the beach at South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. There is much mock-fighting among males on the beach (breeding season is actually over and the truly large bulls have left to forage). The Southern Elephant Seal is one of two species of elephant seal. It is not only the most massive pinniped but also the largest member of the order Carnivora to ever live. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. There is a great sexual dimorphism in size, with the males much larger than the females. While the females average about 680 kg (1,500 lb) and 3 m (10 feet) long, the bulls average around 3636 kg (8,000 lb) and 4.2 m (13 feet) long. The record bull, shot in Possession Bay, South Georgia in 1913, was 5,000 kg (11,000 lb) and 6.9 m (22.5 feet) long. The world's population is approximately 650,000 animals. The largest sub-population is in the South Atlantic with more than 400,000 individuals including approximately 350,000 seals in South Georgia, the other breeding colonies located on the Falkland Islands, Antarctica, and Valdes Peninsula in Argentina (the only continental breeding population). Thanks to satellite tracking, it was found that the animals spend very little time on the surface, usually a few minutes for oxygen. They dive repeatedly, each time for more than twenty minutes, to hunt their prey; squid and fish, between 400 and 1000 m deep. The diving records were recorded in nearly two hours for the duration and more than 1400 m in depth.
Views of the Hotel Hyatt in Santiago, Chile. MORE INFO This is the hotel utilized by Lindblad Expeditions as a stopover in Santiago Chile for southbound travel to Antarctica.
979-9140 - Views of the Hotel Hyatt in Santiago, Chile. MORE INFO This is the hotel utilized by Lindblad Expeditions as a stopover in Santiago Chile for southbound travel to Antarctica.
Adult bull with adult female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on Torgesen Island just outside Palmer Station in Port Arthur, Antarctica. MORE INFO Elephant seals must go through a catastrophic molt each year. This species is the largest pinniped in the world, with males attaining lengths of 6.5 m and a weight of 3,700 kg. A remarkable diver, recorded to depths of 1444 meters and almost 2 hour dives underwater.
979-7495 - Adult bull with adult female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) on Torgesen Island just outside Palmer Station in Port Arthur, Antarctica. MORE INFO Elephant seals must go through a catastrophic molt each year. This species is the largest pinniped in the world, with males attaining lengths of 6.5 m and a weight of 3,700 kg. A remarkable diver, recorded to depths of 1444 meters and almost 2 hour dives underwater.