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Vineyard, Rural landscape, Tiagua, Lanzarote Island, Unesco Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands, Spain, Europe
860-288319 - Vineyard, Rural landscape, Tiagua, Lanzarote Island, Unesco Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands, Spain, Europe
Vineyards, Rural landscape, Volcanic landscape, La Geria, Lanzarote Island, Unesco Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands, Spain, Europe
860-288318 - Vineyards, Rural landscape, Volcanic landscape, La Geria, Lanzarote Island, Unesco Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands, Spain, Europe
Vineyards, Rural landscape, Volcanic landscape, La Geria, Lanzarote Island, Unesco Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands, Spain, Europe
860-288320 - Vineyards, Rural landscape, Volcanic landscape, La Geria, Lanzarote Island, Unesco Biosphere Reserve, Canary Islands, Spain, Europe
A Female Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) Uses Her Anal Fin To Probe Her Redd While A Jack Is Positioned Downstream. Underwater View In An Alaskan Stream During The Summer.
1116-44273 - A Female Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) Uses Her Anal Fin To Probe Her Redd While A Jack Is Positioned Downstream. Underwater View In An Alaskan Stream During The Summer.
Wild dog (lycaon pictus) protecting from the rain under a tree in the savannah, Serengeti, Tanzania
860-287468 - Wild dog (lycaon pictus) protecting from the rain under a tree in the savannah, Serengeti, Tanzania
Pyrenean Mountain Dog and flock of sheep in an alpine pasture, Queyras Regional Nature Park, Alps, France
860-287591 - Pyrenean Mountain Dog and flock of sheep in an alpine pasture, Queyras Regional Nature Park, Alps, France
Shepherd with its Pyrenean Mountain Dogs and flock in an alpine pasture, Queyras Regional Nature Park, Alps, France
860-287592 - Shepherd with its Pyrenean Mountain Dogs and flock in an alpine pasture, Queyras Regional Nature Park, Alps, France
Protection of Arctic Terns, experimental device against gulls, Isle of May, Scotland
860-287550 - Protection of Arctic Terns, experimental device against gulls, Isle of May, Scotland
Lioness With Cubs
1116-40303 - Lioness With Cubs
Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldier, an Evzone, beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
797-13013 - Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldier, an Evzone, beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
Old cannon used to defend Russell in 1845, Bay of Islands, Northland Region, North Island, New Zealand, Pacific
1109-2812 - Old cannon used to defend Russell in 1845, Bay of Islands, Northland Region, North Island, New Zealand, Pacific
Ireland, County Kilkenny, Kilkenny, Kilkenny Castle with the Rose Garden in the foreground.
797-12945 - Ireland, County Kilkenny, Kilkenny, Kilkenny Castle with the Rose Garden in the foreground.
Ireland, County Kilkenny, Kilkenny, Kilkenny Castle, View of the east side.
797-12944 - Ireland, County Kilkenny, Kilkenny, Kilkenny Castle, View of the east side.
Young Great Frigatebird at nest, North Seymour Galapagos
860-284239 - Young Great Frigatebird at nest, North Seymour Galapagos
Proboscis Monkey eating, Labuk Bay Sabah Borneo Malaysia
860-285687 - Proboscis Monkey eating, Labuk Bay Sabah Borneo Malaysia
Griffon vultures on ground with wings spread, Spain
860-284910 - Griffon vultures on ground with wings spread, Spain
Hanuman Langur and young on grass, Rajasthan India
860-284563 - Hanuman Langur and young on grass, Rajasthan India
Portrait of Long-tailed macaque female and young, Indonesia
860-283190 - Portrait of Long-tailed macaque female and young, Indonesia
Paper wasp watching over her nest with larvae, France
860-285612 - Paper wasp watching over her nest with larvae, France
Crested grebe and young in the nest, Picardy France
860-282083 - Crested grebe and young in the nest, Picardy France
Male and young ostrich in savanna, Etosha Namibia
860-283300 - Male and young ostrich in savanna, Etosha Namibia
Fat Dormice and young in their nest in a hollow tree-France
860-284094 - Fat Dormice and young in their nest in a hollow tree-France
Cheetah and young in savanna, East Africa
860-283878 - Cheetah and young in savanna, East Africa
Golden Lion Tamarin and young on a branch
860-284362 - Golden Lion Tamarin and young on a branch
Cheetah and young in savanna, East Africa
860-283875 - Cheetah and young in savanna, East Africa
Griffon vulture on ground with wings spread, Spain
860-284911 - Griffon vulture on ground with wings spread, Spain
Fat Dormice in their nest in a hollow tree, France
860-284085 - Fat Dormice in their nest in a hollow tree, France
Grey Heron and young in nest at spring, United Kingdom
860-283181 - Grey Heron and young in nest at spring, United Kingdom
Fat Dormice and young in their nest in a hollow tree-France
860-284091 - Fat Dormice and young in their nest in a hollow tree-France
Female and nestlings dormouse, France
860-282748 - Female and nestlings dormouse, France
Long-tailed macaque female and young, Indonesia
860-283189 - Long-tailed macaque female and young, Indonesia
Long-tailed Macaques, Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary Bali
860-282294 - Long-tailed Macaques, Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary Bali
King Shag and chick feeding, Falkland Islands
860-286066 - King Shag and chick feeding, Falkland Islands
Cheetah and young in savanna, East Africa
860-283877 - Cheetah and young in savanna, East Africa
Fat Dormouse and young eating Hornbeam samaras , France
860-284090 - Fat Dormouse and young eating Hornbeam samaras , France
Fat Dormouse female and young, France
860-284089 - Fat Dormouse female and young, France
Black-browed Albatross at nest, Falkland Islands
860-283941 - Black-browed Albatross at nest, Falkland Islands
Bornean Orang-utan female and young
860-284358 - Bornean Orang-utan female and young
Long-tailed macaque grooming her young, Bako Malaysia
860-284528 - Long-tailed macaque grooming her young, Bako Malaysia
Long-tailed macaque female and young, Indonesia
860-283188 - Long-tailed macaque female and young, Indonesia
Green monkey breastfeeding her young, Kruger South Africa
860-284189 - Green monkey breastfeeding her young, Kruger South Africa
Bornean Orang-utan female and young
860-284356 - Bornean Orang-utan female and young
African Jacana warming his chicks, East Africa
860-283921 - African Jacana warming his chicks, East Africa
Portrait of Golden damsel prorecting her nest, Fiji Islands
860-285237 - Portrait of Golden damsel prorecting her nest, Fiji Islands
Bornean Orang-utan female and young
860-284357 - Bornean Orang-utan female and young
Female Fat dormouse at nest, France
860-282744 - Female Fat dormouse at nest, France
Low angle view of barbed wire fence
1178-19004 - Low angle view of barbed wire fence
Parents and baby seals, South African Fur Seal, Namibia, Africa
1178-4907 - Parents and baby seals, South African Fur Seal, Namibia, Africa
England, Hampshire, Milford on Sea, Second world war defences at Hurst Castle to defend the strategically important Solent.
797-10858 - England, Hampshire, Milford on Sea, Second world war defences at Hurst Castle to defend the strategically important Solent.
England, Hampshire, Milford on Sea, Second world war defences at Hurst Castle to defend the strategically important Solent.
797-10859 - England, Hampshire, Milford on Sea, Second world war defences at Hurst Castle to defend the strategically important Solent.
Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldiers, Evzones, marching beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
797-11764 - Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldiers, Evzones, marching beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldier, Evzone, marching beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
797-11766 - Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldier, Evzone, marching beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldiers, Evzones, marching beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
797-11765 - Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldiers, Evzones, marching beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldiers, Evzones, beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
797-11763 - Greece, Attica, Athens, Greek soldiers, Evzones, beside Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, outside Parliament building.
Europe, Italy, Tuscany, Siena, Santa Maria Della Scala, Exhibition Of Etruscan Art, Collection Of Pietro Bonci Casuccini, Amphora Representing Heracles Who Defends Hera From The Satyrs
817-466644 - Europe, Italy, Tuscany, Siena, Santa Maria Della Scala, Exhibition Of Etruscan Art, Collection Of Pietro Bonci Casuccini, Amphora Representing Heracles Who Defends Hera From The Satyrs
View of the river Tagus from the governor's room. Torre de Belem. Built in the 16th century in order to defend the Tagus river mouth. Lisbon, Portugal.
817-451434 - View of the river Tagus from the governor's room. Torre de Belem. Built in the 16th century in order to defend the Tagus river mouth. Lisbon, Portugal.
Look of the fortress Spanjola on the harbour of Hvar, Island Hvar, Dalmatia, Croatia
832-294392 - Look of the fortress Spanjola on the harbour of Hvar, Island Hvar, Dalmatia, Croatia
Storm surge barrier, Delta Works, Zeeland, Holland, Netherlands, Europe
832-199346 - Storm surge barrier, Delta Works, Zeeland, Holland, Netherlands, Europe
Storm surge barrier, Delta Works, Zeeland, Holland, Netherlands, Europe
832-199345 - Storm surge barrier, Delta Works, Zeeland, Holland, Netherlands, Europe
Dolphins swimming in tropical water
817-431457 - Dolphins swimming in tropical water
Humpback whales swimming underwater
817-424640 - Humpback whales swimming underwater
Humpback whales swimming underwater
817-424635 - Humpback whales swimming underwater
Cannon at Castillo San Felipe del Morro, San Juan National Historic Site, a national park in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico
817-411980 - Cannon at Castillo San Felipe del Morro, San Juan National Historic Site, a national park in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico
Mamure castle, Anamur, Anatolia, Southwest Turkey
817-411763 - Mamure castle, Anamur, Anatolia, Southwest Turkey
young boy at breakfast, one of many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71520 - young boy at breakfast, one of many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
outdoor bathroom in a courtyard of a new Kung Fu school, washing hair, face, cleaning teeth, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71501 - outdoor bathroom in a courtyard of a new Kung Fu school, washing hair, face, cleaning teeth, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71519 - Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, very young pupils in the dormitory at one of the new Kung Fu Schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71506 - Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, very young pupils in the dormitory at one of the new Kung Fu Schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
pupils in classroom at one of many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71511 - pupils in classroom at one of many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71518 - Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
practice for foreign students in side courtyard of the Shaolin Monastery, known for Shaolin boxing, Taoist Buddhist mountain, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71503 - practice for foreign students in side courtyard of the Shaolin Monastery, known for Shaolin boxing, Taoist Buddhist mountain, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
early morning Kung Fu training, school near Shaolin, a woman works on a sewing machine in the background, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71499 - early morning Kung Fu training, school near Shaolin, a woman works on a sewing machine in the background, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71515 - Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu student kick boxing training, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71491 - Kung Fu student kick boxing training, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
pupils in classroom at one of many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71512 - pupils in classroom at one of many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71517 - Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, school near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, very young pupils in the dormitory at one of the new Kung Fu Schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71507 - Kung Fu training at kindergarten age, at one of the many new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, very young pupils in the dormitory at one of the new Kung Fu Schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Kung Fu student kick boxing training, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71490 - Kung Fu student kick boxing training, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
education, at one of the new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
1113-71513 - education, at one of the new Kung Fu schools in Dengfeng, near Shaolin, Song Shan, Henan province, China, Asia
Panmure Island Lighthouse, Prince Edward Island, Canada
1116-3117 - Panmure Island Lighthouse, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse, Nova Scotia, Canada
1116-3085 - Peggy's Cove Lighthouse, Nova Scotia, Canada
Statues Lining Main Gates Of Ancient City, Angkor Wat, Cambodia
1116-4121 - Statues Lining Main Gates Of Ancient City, Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Lighthouse And Waves, Sunderland, Tyne And Wear, England
1116-3532 - Lighthouse And Waves, Sunderland, Tyne And Wear, England
Small anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla) defending itself, Gran Chaco, Paraguay
832-28465 - Small anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla) defending itself, Gran Chaco, Paraguay
Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
915-567 - Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
915-569 - Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
915-570 - Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
915-568 - Cardiff Bay Barrage, Cardiff, Wales, UK, Europe
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4338 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4336 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
979-9021 - Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in huge surf at Point Wild on Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands, near the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-7078 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in huge surf at Point Wild on Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands, near the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4340 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
979-9022 - Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
979-9020 - Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4339 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
979-4337 - Adult cape petrel (Daption capense) on the wing in and around the Antarctic peninsula. This petrel is sometimes also called the pintado petrel, the word pintado meaning "painted" in Spanish. Cape Petrels breed on numerous islands surrounding Antarctica. They are colonial, nesting on rocky cliffs or on level rocky ground no further than a kilometer from the sea. The nests are simple and are usually placed under an overhanging rock for protection. A single egg is laid in mid to late November and incubated for around 45 days. Both parents take shifts of several days incubating the egg, with the male shifts on average lasting a day longer. Like fulmars Cape Petrels will aggressively defend their nesting site by ejecting stomach oil at intruders; skuas in particular will prey on Cape Petrel eggs and chicks. Once hatched the chick is brooded for 10 days until it is able to thermoregulate, after which both parents hunt at sea to feed it. Cape Petrel chicks fledge after around 45 days. Cape Petrels are extremely aggressive at sea both towards their own species and others, and will even spit oil at competitors. They are also habitual ship-followers. During the summer Cape Petrels feed close to Antarctica's shelf; during the winter they range much further, reaching Angola, Australia and even the Galapagos Islands. Cape Petrels are extremely common seabirds; their population is estimated to be around 2 million birds. They are not considered threatened.
Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
979-9023 - Adult red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) in breeding plumage on Flatey Island in Iceland. MORE INFO This species exhibits reverse sexual dimorphism, females are larger and more brightly colored than males. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Once the females lay their olive-brown eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs and care for the young.
An Arctic tern attacking an intruder to its nest site on the Farne Islands in Northumberland, England, United Kingdom, Europe
911-5122 - An Arctic tern attacking an intruder to its nest site on the Farne Islands in Northumberland, England, United Kingdom, Europe
Men mountain biking on rocky path. Men mountain biking on rocky path
817-345813 - Men mountain biking on rocky path. Men mountain biking on rocky path