Robert Harding

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1350-286 - Polar Bear (Ursa maritimus) in fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) on an island off the sub-arctic coast of Hudson Bay, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Bears come to spend the summer loafing on the island and looking for a careless seal or dead whale to wash up. Global warming has shortened their winter so they are increasingly looking for food in the summer.
1350-280 - Polar Bear (Ursa maritimus) in fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) on an island off the sub-arctic coast of Hudson Bay, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Bears come to spend the summer loafing on the island and looking for a careless seal or dead whale to wash up. Global warming has shortened their winter so they are increasingly looking for food in the summer.
1350-256 - Polar Bear (Ursa maritimus) in fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) on an island off the sub-arctic coast of Hudson Bay, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Bears come to spend the summer loafing on the island and looking for a careless seal or dead whale to wash up. Global warming has shortened their winter so they are increasingly looking for food in the summer.
1350-244 - Polar Bear (Ursa maritimus) in fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) on an island off the sub-arctic coast of Hudson Bay, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Bears come to spend the summer loafing on the island and looking for a careless seal or dead whale to wash up. Global warming has shortened their winter so they are increasingly looking for food in the summer.
1350-318 - Polar Bear (Ursa maritimus) on sea ice off the sub-arctic coast of Hudson Bay, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Bears come to the coast of Hudson Bay in Fall waiting for the ice to freeze, and looking for a careless seal or dead whale to wash up. Global warming has shortened their winter so they are increasingly anxious as they wait for winter. While they wait, they engage in frequent wrestling matches to determine a mating hierarchy for the breeding season in March and April, and regularly check on the ice to see if it will carry them out to sea.
832-388268 - Hotel Hyatt Regency, illuminated with heart, reflection of the lights in the Rhine, closed during the Corona Pandemic, dusk, Media Harbour, Duesseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, Europe
860-287450 - Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time ? a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos
857-96033 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.
857-96034 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.
857-96032 - Each summer the Sami reindeer herders of Northern Scandinavia face the challenge of ear-marking each of the new calves born to their herd. Using the ancient mark of their family, the small carvings made in the ears allow the herders to recognise their herd whilst they graze. It's a daunting task given the number of reindeer they are responsible for and the vast distances they cover as they graze across the mountain pastures north of the Arctic Circle.Sweden?????s indigenous Sami reindeer herders are demanding state aid to help them cope with the impact of this summer?????s unprecedented drought and wildfires, saying their future is at risk as global warming changes the environment in the far north. The Swedish government this week announced five major investigations aimed at preparing the country for the kind of extreme heatwave it experienced in July, when temperatures exceeded 30C (86F) and forest fires raged inside the Arctic circle.